Back to the Beautiful Dingle Peninsula.

This is a selection of beach views . The photos shown here were taken on different days, at different times of the year. Most of them just happen to have been taken at high spring tides, but I can assure you that the beaches are very sandy at other times.

If you click on these photos individually you will see a much sharper image.

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Viewing Ballydavid Head from Béal Bán on a sunny evening with a high spring tide.

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Mount Brandon with a little cloud cover and Ballydavid Head, viewed across a high spring tide.

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On a crisp winter’s day, Mount Brandon is seen here covered in snow.

Like many other beaches in the area it has magnificent views. Mount Brandon, next to Ballydavid head, and on the other side the rear view of the three sisters, aptly frame the scene at each side of the beach.  No monotonous straight horizon line here, the picturesque forms of its beautiful geographical features provide ample relief from this possibility.

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The Three Sisters are seen to the left of the view from the beach

The water here forms particularly regular long uniform waves. Sometimes perfect for surfers, but often unchallenging for the more experienced. To the observer these virtually straight lines of surf which appear to form on top of each other can seem incongruous with one’s expectations of the Atlantic Ocean.

The breaking waves appear larger in the distance, completely contradicting one’s experience of perspective, and as they come closer to the beach, they collapse down, while the next waves breaks on top,  appearing larger and larger; becoming smaller and smaller as they drop down.

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A young couple play hurling at Couminole Beach.

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Ventry Beach

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The lovely Trá Bán (White Strand) on Great Blasket Island, also showing the ruins of deserted houses. More Blasket Island photos on: http://www.helene-brennan.com/c53-blasket-islands-photographs

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The builders have gone home after their day’s work, leaving their creations to the tide

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Creative efforts, now left for the course of nature.

Mount Brandon, the highest mountain on the Dingle Peninsula, often seen with its peak shrouded in  cloud,  is on this day shyly hiding behind a delicate transparent mantle, showing only faint,  tantalising glimpses of its lovely contours as rhythms of light sneak through the thin stretch of cloud.

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Dún an Óir. This is a truly beautiful place, and must be experienced.

This beautiful area, at Dún an Óir is overshadowed by a rather dark history. In November 1580, there was a massacre of several hundred Italian and Spanish Papal troops who landed here to aid an Irish rebellion. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siege_of_Smerwick

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Commemorative monument at Dún an Óir

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Beach offerings. Fresh seaweed has a beauty to be appreciated.

PLEASE VISIT MY WEBSITE FOR MORE DINGLE PENINSULA PHOTOS:

http://www.helene-brennan.com/c25-dingle-peninsula-photos

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