CHARLESTOWN, ITS LIMEKILNS etc.

DSC_8839 lime kilns

I visited Scotland last summer, where I visited friends in Charlestown, Fife,  but haven’t got round to showing these photos until now. Staying at home more due to the corona virus restrictions has finally motivated me to try to get it done.

Charlestown was a planned village created by Charles Bruce, the 5th Earl of Elgin in the 1750s.  The village cottages were built to house the workers operating the limekilns, intending to make the estate a major producer of lime for building purposes and fertiliser. Coal and limestone were resources already available on the estate. The lime industry was previously located in the neighbouring village called Limekilns.

Charlestown soon became one of the most important industrial centres in Scotland, served by a railway and harbour. It’s located on the coast of the Forth estuary, which flows into the North Sea on the East of Scotland.

But from the 1930s lime production diminished and the limekilns at Charlestown finally closed in 1956.  They quickly became derelict and neglected but work on their restoration began in about 1990 and today they represent an amazing bit of history and industrial architecture.

Here are my photos of those wonderful architectural old lime kilns at Charlestown.

DSC_8845 lime kilns

 

DSC_8853

 

DSC_8854

 

DSC_8862 lime kilns

 

DSC_8855 lime kilns detail

 

DSC_8850

 

DSC_8860 lime kilns

 

DSC_8857

 

DSC_8861 lime kiln

 

DSC_8847

 

DSC_8840 lime kilns

 

DSC_8821 Charlestown Harbour

The harbour, now a rather sleepy place compared with it’s once hustle and bustle.

DSC_8823 Charlestown Harbour

 

DSC_8824 charlestown harbour

An old type of houseboat, moored at the harbour.

DSC_8825 Charlestown Harbour

 

DSC_8830 houseboat Charlestown

 

DSC_8832 Houseboat Charleston

 

DSC_8834 boatwreck and Limekilns

 

DSC_8786 cottage gardens

The old worker’s cottages on the Elgin estate, now desirable residences. The tiny stone cottages, with their spacious gardens, all appear to have extensions built now.  Most of them have fabulous gardens, some in the front and back.  I was so impressed with my friend’s garden, above. You couldn’t do that in many parts of West Kerry.

DSC_8792 garden butterfly

 

DSC_8788 cottages in charlestown

 

DSC_8800

The above rooftops and chimneys are of houses on the coast road, Charleston.

DSC_8804 Forth Bridge

A view of the Queensferry Bridge, with the evening sun illuminating the cables, one of three bridges over the Firth of Forth. Another bridge can be glimpsed in the background. I will show more of these bridges in another post.

DSC_8872 poppy field

 

DSC_8868 poppy field

The area is amazingly colourful with flowers – wild and cultivated, everywhere. Above is a field of wild poppies, close to the village. I was amazed to see how much more flowerful the area is compared with back in West Kerry, and the foliage growth on the trees much more advanced, in spite of the more northerly latitude, and also on the cold North Sea. The windy Atlantic coast at home does seem to shorten our summer. They also get more sunshine in this part of Scotland than in West Kerry.

I have more Scotland to show. I hope to do so soon, now that more severe Corona Virus restrictions are keeping me at home.

There are more photos of Scotland on my website, I’m still in the process of adding to that:

http://www.helene-brennan.com/c867-photos-of-scotland

It’s possible to contact me from the website.

Thanks for visiting my post. BE SAFE!

2 thoughts on “CHARLESTOWN, ITS LIMEKILNS etc.

  1. I found this post very interesting. Where I live in Pennsylvania, limekilns were a local industry (I live about a mile from Limekiln Pike, a busy state road whose name comes from the kilns located along its significant length. I also have visited a site near Allentown, PA, about an hour from my house, with cement kilns, which I think are a related process. I enclose a link.

    https://www.lehighcounty.org/Departments/Parks-And-Recreation/Our-Parks/Saylor-Park

    The kilns you show are beautiful to my eyes. What great shapes the structures have.

    So you can see, your information felt very familiar. Except for those lovely gardens. Nobody can do anything like that around here, I think. Wow!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you Claudia. Yes I find these limekilns very beautiful structures too. I had a Google at those PA limekilns (there was a security block on the link you sent). They appear a bit different, but very interesting too. When I look at these things I often think of the hard labour involved, and the gruelling hot, smokey and unhealthy daily grind, and now we can observe from our comfortable lifestyles and ponder on their hardship. Stay safe.

      Like

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