SWALLOWS

A few days ago I discovered these baby swallows in the shed. This is the second brood but I was expecting to see them in the same nest nest as the first lot, but I was very surprised when I saw that they had moved house.

This morning, 29th of August they left the nest. After a lot of excitement, flying around all day, they settled on the gutter in view of my living room window while their parents fed them for some time, and it was very entertaining indeed! My photos were taken through a rather dirty double glazed window – not the most ideal optical equipment, but I wasn’t going to miss an opportunity!

Due to the new editor on wordpress I have been unable to space out the photos, so I apologise that they are too close together. I am in fact most disgruntled with it, as I detest the new block editor, it’s too time consuming, and have attempted to use the old editor. However, it’s not so simple and I have been unable to use the editing techniques that I usually use. This is supposed to be the old one, but it isn’t! I’m very tempted to terminate my relationship with WordPress.

swallows_5555swallows_5561swallows_5562swallows_5568swallows_5569swallows_5573swallows_5575swallows_5576swallows_5577swallows_5593swallows_5596swallows_5598swallows_5600swallows_5628swallows_5638swallows_5644swallows_5646swallows_5655swallows_5661swallows_5663swallows_5669swallows_5680swallows_5694swallows_5708swallows_5716swallows_5724 Continue reading

LEFT OF MOUNT BRANDON

DSC_5343

On this walk we took a path to the left of Mount Brandon, a different side of the mountain from that my previous post. We had intended to go up Brandon but due to low cloud and skeins of foggy patches coming from the sea we thought it safer to not go to the top of the mountain.  I was secretly glad of this, to be honest, because I didn’t feel fit enough for the more challenging walk we might have taken.

DSC_5342

 

 

DSC_5344

The landmarks remained the same for much of the walk, but the clouds changed all the time.

 

DSC_5350

 

 

DSC_5351

This is how Brandon appeared as clouds rolled by.

 

DSC_5352

 

 

DSC_5353

 

 

DSC_5357

 

 

DSC_5358-2

 

 

DSC_5363

My guess at this story is that the farmer left this old vehicle here to use as storage for his fencing materials, and it was first vandalised by human eejits, and later attacked by multiple storms.

DSC_5368

These two photos were taken in the same minute, and look how quickly the picture can change in this kind of weather.

 

DSC_5367

 

 

DSC_5371-2

 

 

DSC_5373

 

 

DSC_5374

 

 

DSC_5375

 

 

DSC_5376

 

 

DSC_5377

We accidentally deviated from our path and arrived at this cliff edge, and sat for our picnic on the grassy slopes below, where I picked up a few sheep ticks – again!  There is Lyme disease here, but one can stay at home and be safe, or go out and take chances.  At least you can’t pass Lyme disease on to anyone else, unlike Covid-19.

DSC_5380

 

 

DSC_5382

 

 

DSC_5386-2

 

 

sheep_5339

 

 

DSC_5387

 

 

DSC_5406

 

 

DSC_5409

 

 

DSC_5413

 

 

DSC_5415 2

So, back down on low ground, and even on the correct route, just signposted with no obvious path.

A lovely walk with great views, and the foggy clouds even added to the beauty of the scenes. I hope you enjoyed the images.

Thanks for viewing my post. Please click on this tag for different views of Mount Brandon, photos and paintings on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/mount+brandon

BRANDON POINT

cloghane_5215

A lovely walk on the far side of the Connor Pass from Dingle, to Brandon Point on the edge of Mount Brandon, and up the hill from the car park. Beautiful views, well worth the journey, although negotiating the tourists on the pass is somewhat precarious in August.  Parts of this road are very narrow and winding, with overhanging rocks, and a steep drop on one side.

Brandon_5223

With the Connor Pass well behind, this is Cloghane Estuary

 

cloghane_5219

 

 

Brandon_5302

View from the car park at Brandon Point.

 

from Brandon Point_5240

 

 

from Brandon Point_5224

 

 

DSC_5230

…and walking up the hill, looking at the views.

 

from Brandon Point_5229

 

 

from Brandon Point_5228

 

 

Brandon_5304

 

 

Brandon_5296

 

 

Brandon_5300

 

 

Brandon_5284

 

 

Brandon_5276

 

 

brandon sheep_5279

 

 

Brandon sheep_5262

 

 

Brandon sheep_5260

 

 

Brandon sheep_5258

 

 

DSC_5266

 

 

from Brandon Point_5246

 

 

from Brandon Point_5247

 

 

from Brandon Point_5243

One of 83 wartime (WW2) lookout posts around the coast of Ireland.

 

Brandon_5247

 

 

 

jasmine and friends_5289

Jasmine and friends, a lovely bunch of people relaxing at the top of the hill beside the cairn.  You can sometimes meet the nicest people at the top of mountains!

 

brandon beach_5315

Brandon Beach

 

brandon_5309

On the journey back to the pass.

 

Brandon_5308

Home safe and sound after this enjoyable little bit of a hill walk. So nice to see the scenery at the other side of Brandon Mountain.

Next I have some photos to show of yet another side of Mount Brandon.  Here is a preview:

DSC_5382

Thank you for your visit to my post, I hope you will join me again for my next post, coming soon.

Dingle Peninsula photos on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c25–photos-of-dingle-peninsula

MOODY HUES

Béal Bán Beach_5138

Some recent photos from my local beach Béal Bán, Ballyferriter, on the Dingle Peninsula, South West Ireland. It was one of those moody days, when the light quality could change in an eye-blink. Just a normal day here really.

Béal Bán Beach_5174

 

 

Béal Bán Beach_5168

 

 

Béal Bán Beach_5166

 

 

Béal Bán Beach_5163

 

 

beal ban beach_5160

 

 

Béal Bán Beach_5159

 

 

Béal Bán Beach_5140

 

 

Béal Bán Beach_5134

 

 

beal ban beach_5133

 

 

Béal Bán Beach_5130

 

 

beal ban beach_5128

 

 

Béal Bán Beach_5123

 

 

beal ban beach_5175

I guessed that the tartan slippers belonged to the occupant of a camper parked here. They created an unlikely and incongruous image by the beach.

beal ban beach_5176

Thanks for visiting my post, I hope you enjoyed  this beach walk.  Please visit my website for more Dingle Peninsula photos, with images of several other lovely beaches in this area.

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c25–photos-of-dingle-peninsula

KILLARNEY NATIONAL PARK (Part 2)

killarney lakes_4932

Continuing our drive through Killarney National Park, following on from my previous post, we three masked women in my van leave behind Muckross Park and Torc Waterfall and we pass Ladies View – the famous and popular viewing place for Killarney’s beautiful lakes. We had to pass it by because there were so many tourists there that it seemed impossible to get a parking spot. However, we stopped at several places not far beyond that, and here are the photos:

killarney lake_5008

 

 

killarney lakes_4935

 

killarney lakes_4938

 

 

killarney lake_4942

 

 

mountains_4953

 

 

killarney mountain 4950

 

 

killarney national park_4954

 

 

killarney national park_4934

 

 

Killarney National Park_4936

 

 

Killarney National Park_4959

 

 

Lake in Killarney National Park_4989

 

 

Lake in Killarney National Park_4960

 

 

Lake in Killarney National Park_4967

 

 

Lake in Killarney National Park_4961

 

 

killarney lakes_4968

 

 

killarney national park lily pads_4977-

Lily pads on the lake.

 

killarney national park_5017

 

 

Killarney National Park_5001-

 

 

Killarney National Park_5000

 

 

Killarney National Park_4996

 

 

killarney national park_5011

In the Black Valley region.

 

killarney national park_5006-

 

 

gap of dunloe_5023

Finally we drove through the famous Gap of Dunloe.  By this time the weather turned very dark and dim and I had to employ a little help from my image editing app to inject a little life into these photos.

 

Gap of Dunloe_5033

 

 

Gap of Dunloe_5031

 

 

jaunting car_4928

Here are some of the jaunting cars that can be hired to tour this area, all fitted with pooh bags, since there were strong objections from many people regarding the amount of horse dung on the pathways of the Killarney National Park.  After some resistance, the jarveys (jaunting car drivers) complied with the new rule imposed by the Office of Public Works.

jaunting cars_4929

We certainly enjoyed our trip through Killarney National Park, and I hope you enjoyed the trip with us also.

In case you missed Part 1 of this post, click here

There are more photos of this area on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c87-photographs-of-the-iveragh-peninsula-and-killarney

Thanks for looking. Stay safe!

 

 

 

 

 

KILLARNEY NATIONAL PARK (Part 1)

muckross gardens_4791

These are photos from The Killarney National Park area, which I visited recently.  It was a couple of  years since I was there, so Killarney’s lovely forests, lakes and mountains made a nice change from the beaches of the Dingle Peninsula. It’s not too far to drive from home, I really should go more often.

Killarney has long been a popular tourist spot, even my parents honeymooned there, soooo many years ago.

I and 2 friends set off in my van, having three seats in front at least we could all get a good look around, besides I can get travel sick in the back seat of a car. So we of course wore masks – three masked women in the front seats of a van!  I joked that we looked like we were out on a heist!

So I hope you will enjoy joining us on our trip.

Our first stop was Muckross Park. where we passed through the gardens and woodland before moving on to Torc Waterfall, where there was more woodland, so my woodland pics got a bit mixed up.

flowers_4798

 

 

DSC_4789

 

 

muckross park_4807

 

 

owengarrif river_4814

 

 

owengarrif river_4812

 

 

DSC_4779

 

 

forest_4826

 

 

forest_4859

 

 

forest_4866

 

 

muckross _4867

 

 

forest_4878

 

 

forest_4879

 

 

muckross arboretum_4854

 

 

muckross

 

 

muckross_4843

 

 

owengarrif river_4815

 

 

owengarrif river_4816

 

 

owengarrif river_4819

Torc Waterfall. The place was teeming with people. Social distancing was not easy here.

 

torc waterfall_4822

This waterfall is 20 metres (66 ft) high, falling a distance of a 110 metres (360 ft) cascade, formed by the Owengarriff River as it drains from the Devil’s Punchbowl corrie lake at Mangerton Mountain.  You cannot see all of it at once, and there is a steep walk up a path to get to see it on another level.

torc waterfall_4824

Above is the first level, and below is the higher level, after the steep walk up the hill.

 

torc waterfall_4837

 

 

torc waterfall_4829

 

 

torc waterfall_4840

On the way back to the car park we came upon this delightful little cottage, looking like a gate lodge to some place – I don’t know where. The garden was overgrown and the house looked un-lived in, although fitted with a security alarm.

killarney cottage garden_4914

 

 

cottage in killarney_4882

We stood there for a while and enjoyed trying to identify the flowers, and one person even hopped in and collected a few seedheads.  Seems we were on a heist after all!

cottage garden_4905

 

 

cottage garden_4898

Thanks for joining us.  I have several more photos to show of the lakes, mountains and the Gap of Dunloe. Please re-join me for the rest of the trip, within the next few days.  Here’s a taster:

killarney lakes_4932

More photos of the South Kerry region and the Killarney National Park area on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c87-photographs-of-the-iveragh-peninsula-and-killarney

 

ONE OF THOSE SUNSETS

emlagh sunset 5038

This one crept up on me, as they often do. I was just settling down to watch one of my favourite TV shows when I glanced out the window and saw these brillant colours in the sky. I nearly didn’t bother, but I decided to go for it, grabbed the camera and ran out and just managed to get a few shots before the colours faded.

emlagh sunset_5037

 

 

emlagh sunset_5040

These bare branches make it look quite wintry. We’ve had some very windy days this summer, following on from a particularly stormy winter. Some of the trees in this area haven’t had a chance to grow or hold onto many leaves.

emlagh sunset_5041

 

 

emlagh sunset_5042

 

 

emlagh sunset_5043

Thanks for looking. Stay safe!