NOVEMBER SUNSHINE

 

A collection of photos from Ventry Beach, on a November Day in glorious warm sunshine.  Yes, sometimes we do have lovely weather in the winter here – just not as much as we might like.  But this was one of those lovely days.

Ventry Beach is a few miles from Dingle town on the Dingle Peninsula in the South West of Ireland.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The village of Ventry can be seen across the water here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have many more photos from Ventry Beach, taken at different times of the year and in different light.  Please visit my website for more photos.

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/ventry+beach

Also, I have published several previous posts here on Ventry Beach. Here are two of them:

https://helenebrennan.wordpress.com/2020/07/25/ventry-beach-2/

https://helenebrennan.wordpress.com/2019/10/22/ventry/

Thanks for viewing my photos. I hope to see you again soon.

A WINTER’S EVENING

An evening walk to catch the last of the evening light on a local beach. This beach I know as Cúl Dorcha, at Ballinrannig, Ballyferriter, on the Dingle Peninsula, in the South West of Ireland.

 

The setting sun cast a lovely light on the incoming waves.

 

There were a few surfers, spending more time off the boards than on them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

He’s up!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

That’s all folks. Thanks for your visit.

More Ballinrannig shots here:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/ballinrannig

 

 

GLANTEENASSIG WOOD

 

Here are photos of the Glanteenassig Forest Park, taken some weeks back, in a sheltered valley of the Slieve Mish Mountains on the Dingle Peninsula. This inland area on the peninsula makes a change from the beaches, lovely as they are, where I often take my walks.

 

There are two lakes in this area. This is Lough Slat.

 

 

 

The weather was rather dim as it often is here; I had to work on getting a bit of colour in the photos! Some days you get lucky with the light, some days you don’t, so you just have to make the best of it.

 

 

 

 

 

The soil under the water was quite pink, and the water coming from peat being very reddish brown in colour, made an amazingly vibrant colour where the light hit on it, in spite of the rather dull day that we had at the time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I liked the starkness of the old dead white wood against the dark background.  Also the rocks have a wonderful pink colour.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lough Caum is the second lake along the trail.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beside the lake, these trees have very interesting bark textures.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thank you for viewing my post. My photos are available from my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c25–photos-of-dingle-peninsula

 

CAPE CLEAR ISLAND and BALTIMORE HARBOUR

 

My trip to Cape Clear Island involved an 8 mile ferry ride from the charming small coastal town  of Baltimore in West County Cork, in the South West of Ireland.

There are also at least seven towns in USA called Baltimore. I wonder how many inhabitants of those towns have any idea what it means. I used to assume it meant big town, from the Gaelic (Irish language). Baile means town and mór means big. But I recently looked it up and apparently it means town of the big house. Baile (town) + Tí or Tigh (house) + Mór (big). So, Baltimore is an anglicisation of the Irish name Baile Tí Mór = town of the big house. The big house seen in the top of this photo above is Baltimore Castle, originally built in 1215.

Just hanging about, waiting for the ferry.

 

On the ferry out of Baltimore Harbour one can see the Beacon. It was constructed in 1884 and marks the headland of the strait between Sherkin Island and the mainland at the entrance to Baltimore harbour.

Approaching Cape Clear Island.

 

These photos were taken from the boat.

 

 

 

Approaching the Island’s North Harbour.

 

 

 

Just next to the harbour is this old ruin, St. Kieran’s Church, dating from about the 12th century.

 

At the harbour there is a tourist information centre, cafe, pub, heritage centre/museum, all of which were closed, due to the covid-19 restrictions that were in place at the time. A map outside the tourist info centre would have been useful, but there was none.  Food and tea/coffee were available from a kiosk, where the woman serving was run off her feet with the visitors from the ferries.

Nothing to do here on this 3 x 1 mile island but walk, nothing wrong with that on a beautiful sunny day. Of course I took the usual hundreds of photos on this walk around the roads of the island, which is very hilly, up and down, up and down… and very short of signposts.

 

The sight of old ruined stone cottages is a common one all over ireland. Over the years, particularly the past two centuries, people have left their homes and many emigrated for a variety of reasons, mostly because of poverty, famine, eviction etc.  Some, in better times, simply built a new house nearby and let the old one decay.

 

 

 

 

Cork has many islands but only about 7 of them are inhabited.

 

 

 

 

 

 

True love!

There are about 100+ inhabitants on this island, although pre-famine (mid 19th century) there were over 1000. They would like to attract more people there now, particularly young families. If I were younger I’d give it some thought!

Capr Clear is a Gaeltacht (Irish speaking) island.

 

 

 

Fastnet Rock Lighthouse.  This is the closest I could get to it. There is a ferry trip from Baltimore that goes to the lighthouse, as well as calling at Cape Clear Island. I would really love to have done that trip, but due to my propensity for sea-sickness, I had to give it a miss. But now that I’ve seen the boats (they’re quite big and stable) I think I should do it next time.

 

 

 

 

The island’s South Harbour, above.

The old lighthouse and signal station unused since 1854, when the first Fastnet Lighthouse was built.

 

The lighthouse is in amazingly good condition, with its precision cut granite  block construction.

 

 

I suspect these harbours would normally be much busier. Covid-19 has taken its toll on tourism and marine leisure activities.

 

Glamping has come to Cape Clear; there are some yurts for holiday rental.

Time to return to the mainland.

 

 

 

Leaving Cape Clear Island.

 

Back at Baltimore. A gorse/heather fire was on the hill, creating a lot of smoke.  Farmers burn the gorse and heather to create more grazing land.  Don’t know why they don’t use goats.

Baltimore Harbour, with the big house, or castle, overlooking the harbour.

 

 

I was going to split these photos into two separate posts, but I decided to put them all together. Thank you for your patience if you have reached the end. I hope you enjoyed the trip to Cape Clear with me. Thanks so much for viewing my post.

More West Cork photos on my website: https://www.helene-brennan.com/c865-west-cork

 

 

MIZEN PENINSULA, WEST CORK

 

I have so many photos from my September trips to West Cork, that I have to show them in several posts, in order to do them some justice. No point in showing too many at once. This is another lovely area in the South West of Ireland, with a beautiful coastline, many ancient historical monuments and much more…  I was lucky to get to do a few trips before stricter lockdown restrictions were imposed again.

This post focuses mainly on the Mizen Peninsula of West Cork. There is so much to see here that I only skimmed the surface really, in a manner of speaking. It would be necessary to stay for an extended break to explore more thoroughly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Altar Wedge Tomb, above, which dates back to 2500 to 2000 BC. This was easy to find on the coastal drive. It’s about 7 kilometres west of the town of Schull, and overlooks Toormore Bay.

This information was taken from notices at the site.

 

Some of the coastal views near the tomb, below.

 

 

 

 

 

Mizen Head, below.

This is a popular place for visitors, with a visitor’s centre, an interesting bridge leading to the Mizen Head lightouse and fog signal station.  Mizen Head is the most South Westerly point of Ireland.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The lighthouse and signal station, above.

 

 

 

The rock formations here are really quite something to look at.

 

 

 

They say this can be a good place to spot seals.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It was really quite busy with visitors, making social distancing somewhat awkward on the narrow paths and bridge.  I use this as an excuse for the fact that while concentrating on my photos, plus trying to maintain appropriate distance from people, I managed to miss the path to the lighthouse, and I returned to the beginning of the walk without going there. It was a very hilly and exhausting walk, so I didn’t feel like going around again.  Ah well, next time!

Next stop Mount Gabriel. The photo above was taken later, it shows the two giant footballs on the top of the mountain. This is actually an aviation radar station and we thought we should go up there to investigate and see the views.

 

Views from the top of Mount Gabriel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The purpose of this radar station is to track flights over european air space. In September 1982, one of the two globes was bombed by the terrorist group, the Irish National Liberation Army (INLA, a splinter group of the IRA).  It is believed that the bombing was prompted by the publication of a newspaper article which claimed that the installation was part of the NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organisation) radar system.  Generally believed to be fake news.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I appreciate your visit and hope you will come back again to see photos of Cape Clear Island. Cape Clear is just a short ferry ride from Baltimore.

More West Cork photos on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c865-west-cork