TRÁBEG, KINARD, KERRY

These photos are from Trábeg Strand, a small and often dramatic wild beach in the Kinard West area on the south side of the Dingle Peninsula.

It’s pot luck whether you get any sunshine when you go out for a walk here, and after a promising start to the morning, the sky clouded over before getting there.😕

This is also one of those wild places to which photographers are drawn for those really turbulent sea images. This was not the best day for that, with the swells of last night’s gales already dying down.

Not to be deterred, I thought, I’m here now so I’ll make the best of it. I lived close to this beach many years ago, before digital photography. I haven’t been back many times since. (Wonder where all those 35mm prints are now!) 

This is the entrance to the beach. – Very stoney at the moment. In my previous life here I observed the sand come in and go out frequently with the storms. Now it appears more stoney than ever. I was also very surprised how high the water level was, considering it was only an hour away from low tide. I expected to be able to walk around the rocks to different sections of the beach at this time, but not so. A low spring tide should be ok – next time!

 

This large stack here is a very familiar landmark, which can be seen from many high places, particularly the Conor Pass road, shown below, on another day.

The sea stack is called The Searrach (Siorrach), there are often alternative name variations and spellings here. The Searrach means foal.

Every photographer who comes here wants to get a good big splash on the Searrach. I just have to be content with the stack and no big splash pictures. The water, though rough, just wasn’t quite wild enough.  Must find those old prints!

 

 

 

 

It really didn’t feel safe on the beach, you can’t trust the ocean, when it’s rough and the beach is small. We didn’t stay for long.  I’ll definitely have to go back.

For some of my images of the wider Kerry area check out this tag for Kerry Coast Images

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/kerry+coast+images

Thanks for viewing my post, and keep safe.

 

ROAD WALK VIEWS, EMLAGH TO VENTRY

This was a walk from the Emlagh area, Ballyferriter, to Ventry, via Leataoibh, on the Dingle Peninsula, It was a reasonably pleasant day with sunny spells and cloudy patches, which I think often make the landscape more interesting and photogenic.

Cruach Mharhain is the peaky mountain in these photos.  I have previously posted photos taken from a walk up this mountain, but I must have deleted that post. I had to delete several earlier posts to create more media space. I have to walk up there again some day soon, but it requires some preceeding days of dry weather, and that’s not easy to get here at this time of the year.

When walking alone I get better photos. When I walk with other people I am distracted with conversation and also I always think I am very boring as a walking companion, as I keep stopping to snap the views.  So, on this occasion I did not take many shots, and instead I have included the following six photos from the same route, on earlier dates.

 

Just a farm shed on the roadside. I would think it was probably once someone’s home, a long time ago.

 

The Three Sisters, above, a familiar sight that can be seen from many places in this area.

A quiet country road, looking back, with Mount Brandon in view.

I really liked the character of this rusty old tractor. As you can see I gave it some aging treatment.

Mount Eagle in this one above. Another one I must climb again soon – also waiting for dryer weather for this one. I often do a short walk up for some heart & lung exercise.

I liked the mossy clumps that nestled on this ailing holly bush in someone’s garden.

 

 

A view over Ventry and Dingle Bay, with the Iveragh Peninsula (South Kerry) across the bay.

 

Arriving in the Ventry area, here is Rathanane Castle, (also Rahinanne, spellings vary here) a tower house that was built by the once very powerful Fitzgerald family, way back in the 15th century. It was built on top of the remains of an ancient ringfort and souterrain.  This castle, like so many others across Ireland, was destroyed by Oliver Cromwell’s forces around 1650, when he led a band of troops through Ireland, on a very bloody campaign. (Cromwell was a British political and military leader). I read only recently that he died from complications of malaria, contracted from a mosquito bite he sustained while in Ireland.  Wonder if it was a Kerry mosquito!  I was surprised to learn that there was malaria here then.

It is posssible to walk in around the castle on payment of about a euro to the land owner. I have been in there a few years back. Two photos below are from that occasion.

It was a rather dull cloudy day, giving a menacing feel to the atmosphere.

Shortly after that we arrived at Ventry village to pick up the car we had parked there earlier, being a linear walk.

This link will take you to more photos of the Emlagh, Ballyferriter area:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/emlagh

Thank you for your visit. I hope you have enjoyed my photos.