GOODBYE THRIFT, HELLO CHAMOMILE

I set out to take some photos in the late evening sun, as I have done many times before. Not really sure where I would go to get something different from the previous hundreds – or thousands of shots I’ve taken in this area of the Dingle Peninsula where I live, I drove my van along the road until I came to Clogher Beach. It was a beautiful, sunny and calm evening and I liked the look of Clogher as I approached, so I parked up there.

I set out on the cliff walk from the beach to Cuas na nEighe. Some of you may recognise the place from my previous posts. I hoped to get some different images.

goodbye thrift refers to the sea pinks, also called thrifts. In previous posts I have shown the amazing swathes and clumps of these gorgeous pink flowers that festoon the cliffs in this area. Now they have turned brown and finished flowering for this year. Gone, but not forever. The thrill has definitely not gone, now that instead of thrift there are wonderful chamomile blossoms proliferating all along the cliff tops.

The Island of Inis Tuaisceart (The Sleeping Giant) is above.

The Tiaracht is the Island above.

As you can see, the thrift is still there in profusion, but not much pink there now, it’s mostly brown, but still quite attractive with the sunlight catching the tips of them.

Now I have Sybil Head (Ceann Sibéal) in view, above.

It was the way the low evening sunlight caught the tops of the flowers and grasses that caught my interest that evening. Even the way the dock seed heads above were illuminated, seemed really beautiful to me.

A closer look at the Sleeping Giant, above.

A sheep posed obligingly, in front of Sybil Head.

Well I seem to have such a lot of images to show – far too many for one post. I’ve decided to leave the others which include the sunset from this walk for my next post.

Thank you so much for visiting my blog. There are many images – photos and paintings from the Clogher area on my website. It would be great if you would check it out!

SUMMER’S EVENING PHOTOS

Here are some more photos taken one evening recently on one of my local beaches, Béal Bán (White Mount). I have shown many pics from there in previous posts, and as I always say, each day it looks different, as the light changes so much. I have to admit that I was feeling a little challenged to get some images that looked sufficiently different from previous efforts, but I think I succeeded; I hope you will agree.

It’s wonderful to have the long days. These captures were taken between 8.00 pm and 9.00 pm. It’s so nice to be able to walk on the beaches in the sunny evenings – if the sun shines, of course.

I zoomed across the bay to get close ups of the mountains. Below you can see Mount Brandon and the village of Ballydavid and it’s small beach and harbour.

There is a rocky area at the end of this lovely sandy beach. The low tide exposed more rocks than you might sometimes see.

As the tide was very low, the sand had these wavy, groovy patterns, which is often fodder for photographic images.

I was delighted to come across this sand castle, evidence of much fun and imagination by some child or children on the beach earlier.

I appreciate your visit. It would also be so nice if you would check out my Dingle Peninsula photos on my website. Thank you so much.

SUNSET ON THE LONGEST DAY 2021

In Ballyferriter, on the Dingle Peninsula, in the South West of Ireland.

To celebrate the end of the longest day, I went into the field next to my garden to get a good look at the setting sun. It was not the most brilliantly colourful sunset, but it was good to see the sun, rather than a bank of clouds, which might have been the case!

The sun was dropping down behind the Three Sisters, which appear in many of my photos.

To maximise the colour I zoomed in close to the sunset.

Aahh – goodnight sun!

I turned around and saw the moon, thought I might as well take a shot.

Thanks for looking. Happy solstice!

WILD ATLANTIC CLIFF WALK

Just a few photos from a cliff walk left of Clogher Beach (left when facing the sea), on the Dingle Peninsula in the South West of Ireland. I didn’t have my good camera with me, so these are taken with my phone camera mostly just snapped in a hurry. I really hope to go back to this place again soon and take my time with my photos.

There was a lovely shimmer on the water and the colour of the sea was so breathtaking! White foamy trails streamed around the coast.

The sea pinks are looking really splendid at this time of the year.

The path above looks easy going enough, but not all of it was like this. Some parts were very hazardous, and a little slip or trip up could result in a nasty fall down a rock face. It was a little scary and challenging for my rather mature knees and less than perfect balance! The path has been eroded by storms a number of times, falling into the sea, but another path would be created and it would be walkable again for a while.

The views are really beautiful. At the top of this photo you can see Sybil Head, The Three Sisters and Ballydavid Head. That’s Clogher Beach on the right. It was an amazing walk.

There was a lot of these tiny pink wild flowers, which I haven’t yet identified.

It was a round trip involving a road walk which led back to the beach. I didn’t take photos on the road trip.

There are many more images of the Clogher area on my website, paintings and photos.

I hope you enjoyed this little walk. Thanks so much for your visit.

CYPRUS – Paphos Coast

I have just discovered this post I drafted some time ago, but for some reason I never published it. I guess I had intended to improve it in some way, or add some more photos. So now I think I might as well publish it – finally. These photos were taken a few years ago in the Paphos area of Cyprus, where I have enjoyed a few trips in recent years.

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“Sol Alter” above, a sculpture by Yiota Ioannidou, next to the castle at Paphos Harbour. One of several sculptures along this coast which were commissioned in 2017 when Paphos was European City of Culture.

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The Lighthouse, in the grounds of the Paphos Archaeological Park

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I usually visit Cyprus in the winter, when the weather can be unpredictable, but still better than in the South West of Ireland!

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Paphos Castle next to Paphos harbour. It was originally built as a Byzantine fort to protect the harbour. It was destroyed in the earthquake of 1222 and later rebuilt by the Lusignans in the thirteenth century. In 1570 the Venetians destroyed it, and later it was again restored by the Ottomans. Now a tourist attraction and used as a backdrop for festivals and events.

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The harbour has some unusual looking boats, mainly for tourist trips.

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Tourists gather below at sunset beside the Castle at Paphos Harbour to take photos.

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“Red Poppy” sculpture by Andreas Paraskevas, also commissioned for the European Capital of Culture in 2017, when Paphos had the title.

I have also made several other posts on Cyprus

PAPHOS ARCHEOLOGICAL PARK

TOMBS OF THE KINGS, PAPHOS, CYPRUS

CYPRUS – Agia-Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa

WINTER IN PAPHOS, CYPRUS

TIME AND TIDE – and Flaking Paint (old boat at Latchi)

THE MAGIC OF LIGHT  (Zygi Harbour, Cyprus)

 STAVROVOUNI  (Cyprus)

STAVROVOUNI 2  (CYPRUS)

APPROACHING CYPRUS

CYPRUS, IN THE TROODOS MOUNTAINS

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Thanks for your visit. Do take a look at my website where I many photos from Cyprus available for purchase

PAINTINGS

Recently finished oil paintings, 70 x 50 cms. – But are they finished? I have a habit of never being satisfied and going back again and again. Some of these paintings have been on the go since last year.

The painting above was inspired by the movement of the water towards Feothanach Beach, Ballydavid, Dingle Peninsula.

Very nearby, a different view of the Three Sisters from above Dooneen Pier, with some typical Atlantic weather.

Rathinane Castle, Ventry, Dingle Peninsula.

The warm light of the setting sun on the trees in my back garden.

Thanks for visiting. More paintings of Dingle Peninsula on my website.

CROCUSES

Crocuses from a rather wet, windswept garden, bringing hope and cheer after the bleak winter weather. I took these photos earlier this year, and only now in May – a little out of season – I found them on my computer and decided to publish them. So many photos are waiting for me to sort and show! Procrastination rules!

Thanks for looking.

VIEWS FROM CRUACH MHARHAIN (2)

Following from my earlier post Walking up Cruach Mharhain, these photos show arrival at the top of this rather steep little mountain, on the Dingle Peninsula, in the South West of Ireland.

The views from the top of Cruach Mharhain are so amazingly beautiful; it’s such a rewarding walk. It’s one of my favourites, but often the ground is too soggy, especially in the winter. Recently we had such a lot of dry weather that the ground was very dry and firm, perfect for walking.

Sybil Head (Ceann Sibéal), above.

Inis Tuaisceart (Sleeping Giant), one of the Blasket Island group, above.

The Three Sisters, top left, and Ballydavid Head, to the right of them.

A zoomed in look at Clogher Beach, above.

Mount Brandon, taken on the way down again.

The Blasket Islands, above and below.

There are lambs galore in the fields, and who could resist taking a photo or two.

So that’s the end of that walk. It’s a perfect little workout for the heart and lungs, and at the same time offering such wonderful visual and mental nourishment. I hope you enjoyed the views too. Thanks for looking.

Many photos of the Dingle Peninsula are available from my website.

WALKING UP CRUACH MHARHAIN

A selection of photos from a walk up Cruach Mharhain. The photo below (from a previous post) shows how this modestly sized mountain appears from my home, on the Dingle Peninsula.

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This is a short sharp ascent from where I park my car, but it doesn’t take long to get to the top – unless of course, like me, you keep stopping to take photos.

The weather was perfect, with glorious sunshine and cloud shadows giving definition and form to the landscape. I think the views from this mountain are hard to beat, it’s such a rewarding walk.

You can even see the mountains of the Iveragh Peninsula across the bay above.

There are amazing views of the Blasket Islands from this mountain.

Getting higher, nearly there! There are so many photos to show I have decided to show the others in another post. The best views are at the top. Please come back to see the next post. Thanks for visiting.

EVENING AT CLOGHER HEAD 2

Since my recent post, Evening at Clogher Head, I returned again to try and get some more photos before the light faded, and I also hoped to get a decent sunset.

Looking over towards Dunmore Head, above.

The sun was casting a weak pink light over the landscape

This is one of my favourite places on the peninsula, with wonderful vistas.

Hoping for a good sunset is like hoping to win the lottery! This was not the best one I’ve seen, but at least the sun wasn’t covered in thick cloud, as it often is here.

The Sleeping Giant, lies peacefully in the warm light of the disappearing sun.

I zoomed in close to get this one above, creating the illusion that the whole sky was ablaze with colour – which it wasn’t really.

I enjoy creating images in the evening light. There are several more from diffferent places – even different countries, to be seen on this tag:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/evening+light

Thanks for visiting. Good health to all.