VIEWS FROM CRUACH MHARHAIN (2)

Following from my earlier post Walking up Cruach Mharhain, these photos show arrival at the top of this rather steep little mountain, on the Dingle Peninsula, in the South West of Ireland.

The views from the top of Cruach Mharhain are so amazingly beautiful; it’s such a rewarding walk. It’s one of my favourites, but often the ground is too soggy, especially in the winter. Recently we had such a lot of dry weather that the ground was very dry and firm, perfect for walking.

Sybil Head (Ceann Sibéal), above.

Inis Tuaisceart (Sleeping Giant), one of the Blasket Island group, above.

The Three Sisters, top left, and Ballydavid Head, to the right of them.

A zoomed in look at Clogher Beach, above.

Mount Brandon, taken on the way down again.

The Blasket Islands, above and below.

There are lambs galore in the fields, and who could resist taking a photo or two.

So that’s the end of that walk. It’s a perfect little workout for the heart and lungs, and at the same time offering such wonderful visual and mental nourishment. I hope you enjoyed the views too. Thanks for looking.

Many photos of the Dingle Peninsula are available from my website.

WALKING UP CRUACH MHARHAIN

A selection of photos from a walk up Cruach Mharhain. The photo below (from a previous post) shows how this modestly sized mountain appears from my home, on the Dingle Peninsula.

DSC_1341 Emlagh Dingle Sunset

This is a short sharp ascent from where I park my car, but it doesn’t take long to get to the top – unless of course, like me, you keep stopping to take photos.

The weather was perfect, with glorious sunshine and cloud shadows giving definition and form to the landscape. I think the views from this mountain are hard to beat, it’s such a rewarding walk.

You can even see the mountains of the Iveragh Peninsula across the bay above.

There are amazing views of the Blasket Islands from this mountain.

Getting higher, nearly there! There are so many photos to show I have decided to show the others in another post. The best views are at the top. Please come back to see the next post. Thanks for visiting.

EVENING AT CLOGHER HEAD 2

Since my recent post, Evening at Clogher Head, I returned again to try and get some more photos before the light faded, and I also hoped to get a decent sunset.

Looking over towards Dunmore Head, above.

The sun was casting a weak pink light over the landscape

This is one of my favourite places on the peninsula, with wonderful vistas.

Hoping for a good sunset is like hoping to win the lottery! This was not the best one I’ve seen, but at least the sun wasn’t covered in thick cloud, as it often is here.

The Sleeping Giant, lies peacefully in the warm light of the disappearing sun.

I zoomed in close to get this one above, creating the illusion that the whole sky was ablaze with colour – which it wasn’t really.

I enjoy creating images in the evening light. There are several more from diffferent places – even different countries, to be seen on this tag:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/evening+light

Thanks for visiting. Good health to all.

DINGLE – SO BLUE – SO QUIET

Dingle Harbour, still in lockdown and very quiet. I took a few shots around the harbour and a few around the town recently.

Many of the pontoons are vacant, no tourist trips and very few yachts are in the marina. There are just the usual fishing boats around the harbour. It all seems so strange, yet I really like to see it so quiet.

You may wonder what is the large boxy building – it is the ice plant, for the fish catch.

So far – I don’t believe these gulls have become as aggressive as those in many other seaside towns, where your ice cream or chips might be swiped from your hand. Our gulls are still quite mannerly!

The blue building in this photo is the Dingle Distillery, which makes excellent whiskey, gin and vodka.

Aside from lockdown, the harbour would be quiter than it used to be because of the disappearance of Fungie, the beloved Dingle Dolphin. Nobody has seen anything of him for months now.

Dingle town, so quiet.

A few shots of a Dingle garden

Thank you so much for viewing my post.

EVENING AT CLOGHER HEAD

 

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Evening photos on Clogher Head (in Irish – Ceann Sraithe, Sratha, Sreatha, spellings differ). I drove over there one evening to catch the warm light on this most scenic of places on the Dingle Peninsula. My collection includes several photos from this spot, but I like to keep updating, even though I may have taken better photos there on previous occasions.

DSC_1014 Sleeping Giant

The Blasket Islands can be seen from here, looking splendid in the warm glow of the setting sun.

DSC_1007 Great Blasket Island

 

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DSC_1001 sybil head

Sybil Head (Ceann Sibéal) appears at its most majestic from this viewing point.  There is something about this headland that I find quite compelling and magnetic, that I also find very difficult to capture in photos. I will go back again – and again – to try to get that quality that eludes me. I may also tell you a little story about this headland… later.

I have already mentioned on a number of occasions that the top of this headland was a film location for a Star Wars movie a few years ago.  At that time a telescope was placed at Clogher Head so that people could look over at the activities on the film set.

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Clogher Beach, The Three Sisters and Ballydavid Head, above

DSC_1006 mount brandon

To the right of Ballydavid Head is Mount Brandon, zoomed a little closer, above.

DSC_0999 Mount Brandon from Ceann Sraithe

 

DSC_0998 Sybil Head and Clogher Beach

 

 

DSC_1002 Clogher Beach and Ferriters Cove

 

DSC_1016 standing stone-clogher head

An ancient standing stone, above and below. I would prefer not to have it exactly in the centre of the composition but the ground was so wet I couldn’t stand where I needed to. I was also in a bit of a hurry because I arrived on the scene a little too late and the sun was going down very fast.

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A slightly better composition was possible with my mobile phone, above.

 

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The sun was obviously setting behind these rocks below, as this couple appeared to be enjoying the spectacle.

DSC_1019 watching the sunset

I hope you enjoyed the evening at Clogher Head. Thanks for looking. More Dingle Peninsula photos on this link:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c25–photos-of-dingle-peninsula

JUST COLOURFUL SHEEP

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These are just a few captures of sheep with – it seemed to me – extra vibrant colourful identification markings.  Perhaps they were just freshly done. They came bounding over to the gate as we passed. Sheep don’t often do that, but perhaps they had recently been getting some kind of feed over the gate from the farmer, so they thought it was lunchtime!

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In this shot above I would have preferred it if that sheep in the foreground had turned to the camera. Animals can be quite tricky like this. Just as you are ready to press the button they turn away!!

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Thanks so much for viewing

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c101-animals–birds-and-other-nature-photos

A WINTER WALK

Some photos from a walk in the Mount Brandon vicinity last December. I didn’t get round to posting them earlier because I didn’t know the name of the townland – still don’t know, but I thought it worth showing these photos anyway. This path leads to one of the routes for ascending the mountain. I didnt get many photos mainly due to poor weather, but a few minutes of light gave some nice views, looking back from start of the mountain path.

Thanks so much for looking.

WILD ATLANTIC WALK

These photos were taken from Clogher Beach and the cliff walk to Cuas na nEighe from the beach. This is the place for massive, wild and wonderful waves, where many people – photographers and others go to capture the Atlantic wildness, or just to observe and enjoy it.

This rock above can send the most enormous splash way up to the sky. Photographers love to catch this moment. It always happens just when you take your eye off the ball, in a manner of speaking. I’ve seen some arrive with their tripods and camera pointed at the rock, ready for the event, and not being side-tracked by any of the lovely dancing light on the spray etc. They leave as soon as they capture it. Nothing else matters.

If you follow my posts you would have seen many other photos from this place, but as I often say, it changes every day, with the wind and the light.

Lace-like patterns swoosh towards the beach.

The island above right is Inis Tuaisceart, one of the Blasket Island group, commonly known as The Sleeping Giant, or locally known as Fear Marbh (Dead Man). It appears in many of my photos and paintings.

The Island in the distance above is another Blasket Island, the Tiaracht. It resembles the Great Skellig Rock, near the Iveragh Peninsula of South Kerry. Many people get confused with it,

I love these dancing shapes riding on top of the water, with the spray flying in the wind.

The next six images are from Cuas na nEighe, one of the most wild and wonderful places on the Dingle Peninsula, in my view.

At Cuas na nEighe, with Sybil Head in view.

These big splashes are so irresistable.

On the return towards Clogher Beach.

I hope you enjoy these coastal pics.

More Clogher Beach and Cosán na nEighe images

Thanks so much for visiting.

TRIP TO THE LOCAL

A trip to the local would normally mean to the local pub here, but with all the pubs still closed, now it’s a trip to the local beach! Much more healthy of course. This is another look at Béal Bán (White Mouth) Beach in Ballyferriter, on the Dingle Peninsula. My followers may remember several views from here in the past. I don’t like to go for a walk without my camera, so hopefully these photos are sufficiently different from previous versions.

I have a new camera for these past couple of months and I’ve recently realised that the date in the camera is in 2028! I thought I had re-set it but apparently not. Only discovered that after serious delving into why Google refused to publish a photo. They were unable to tell me why, but eventually I worked it out for myself. There are just too many photos taken now to change all the dates in, so hopefully these images don’t cause too much of a problem.

I never tire of watching the waves and capturing them.

Carraig Dubh (Black Rock) is the name of this rock – I’m told. I have been given other information, but I’ll go with the first.

It was quite a dull afternoon with glimpses of bright sunlight and dark shadows.

I find many of the normally sandy beaches here have a lot of stones on them recently, as the sand appears to have been dragged out with the storms. I hope the sand comes back with more storms. It does come and go a lot.

These birds were enjoying some quiet down time until I came along – they weren’t long moving.

Winter sea swimming has become so popular these days. They say it does wonders for your health. I’m not convinced.

Doubt if they expected waves this size!

Oops – they’re gone! They did re-appear.

Mount Brandon with a bright fluffy hat.

These cows were quietly enjoying the view over the sea.

I hope you enjoyed this trip to the local with me. These and many other photos of this beach and other local trips in the Ballyferriter area can be seen on this link:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/ballyferriter