TRÁBEG, KINARD, KERRY

These photos are from Trábeg Strand, a small and often dramatic wild beach in the Kinard West area on the south side of the Dingle Peninsula.

It’s pot luck whether you get any sunshine when you go out for a walk here, and after a promising start to the morning, the sky clouded over before getting there.😕

This is also one of those wild places to which photographers are drawn for those really turbulent sea images. This was not the best day for that, with the swells of last night’s gales already dying down.

Not to be deterred, I thought, I’m here now so I’ll make the best of it. I lived close to this beach many years ago, before digital photography. I haven’t been back many times since. (Wonder where all those 35mm prints are now!) 

This is the entrance to the beach. – Very stoney at the moment. In my previous life here I observed the sand come in and go out frequently with the storms. Now it appears more stoney than ever. I was also very surprised how high the water level was, considering it was only an hour away from low tide. I expected to be able to walk around the rocks to different sections of the beach at this time, but not so. A low spring tide should be ok – next time!

 

This large stack here is a very familiar landmark, which can be seen from many high places, particularly the Conor Pass road, shown below, on another day.

The sea stack is called The Searrach (Siorrach), there are often alternative name variations and spellings here. The Searrach means foal.

Every photographer who comes here wants to get a good big splash on the Searrach. I just have to be content with the stack and no big splash pictures. The water, though rough, just wasn’t quite wild enough.  Must find those old prints!

 

 

 

 

It really didn’t feel safe on the beach, you can’t trust the ocean, when it’s rough and the beach is small. We didn’t stay for long.  I’ll definitely have to go back.

For some of my images of the wider Kerry area check out this tag for Kerry Coast Images

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/kerry+coast+images

Thanks for viewing my post, and keep safe.

 

ROAD WALK VIEWS, EMLAGH TO VENTRY

This was a walk from the Emlagh area, Ballyferriter, to Ventry, via Leataoibh, on the Dingle Peninsula, It was a reasonably pleasant day with sunny spells and cloudy patches, which I think often make the landscape more interesting and photogenic.

Cruach Mharhain is the peaky mountain in these photos.  I have previously posted photos taken from a walk up this mountain, but I must have deleted that post. I had to delete several earlier posts to create more media space. I have to walk up there again some day soon, but it requires some preceeding days of dry weather, and that’s not easy to get here at this time of the year.

When walking alone I get better photos. When I walk with other people I am distracted with conversation and also I always think I am very boring as a walking companion, as I keep stopping to snap the views.  So, on this occasion I did not take many shots, and instead I have included the following six photos from the same route, on earlier dates.

 

Just a farm shed on the roadside. I would think it was probably once someone’s home, a long time ago.

 

The Three Sisters, above, a familiar sight that can be seen from many places in this area.

A quiet country road, looking back, with Mount Brandon in view.

I really liked the character of this rusty old tractor. As you can see I gave it some aging treatment.

Mount Eagle in this one above. Another one I must climb again soon – also waiting for dryer weather for this one. I often do a short walk up for some heart & lung exercise.

I liked the mossy clumps that nestled on this ailing holly bush in someone’s garden.

 

 

A view over Ventry and Dingle Bay, with the Iveragh Peninsula (South Kerry) across the bay.

 

Arriving in the Ventry area, here is Rathanane Castle, (also Rahinanne, spellings vary here) a tower house that was built by the once very powerful Fitzgerald family, way back in the 15th century. It was built on top of the remains of an ancient ringfort and souterrain.  This castle, like so many others across Ireland, was destroyed by Oliver Cromwell’s forces around 1650, when he led a band of troops through Ireland, on a very bloody campaign. (Cromwell was a British political and military leader). I read only recently that he died from complications of malaria, contracted from a mosquito bite he sustained while in Ireland.  Wonder if it was a Kerry mosquito!  I was surprised to learn that there was malaria here then.

It is posssible to walk in around the castle on payment of about a euro to the land owner. I have been in there a few years back. Two photos below are from that occasion.

It was a rather dull cloudy day, giving a menacing feel to the atmosphere.

Shortly after that we arrived at Ventry village to pick up the car we had parked there earlier, being a linear walk.

This link will take you to more photos of the Emlagh, Ballyferriter area:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/emlagh

Thank you for your visit. I hope you have enjoyed my photos.

SNOWY TOP ON MOUNT BRANDON

It was one of those cold, numb finger days, walking on the roads in the vicinity of Mount Brandon, on the Dingle Peninsula. The mountain gleamed bright white with its sugaring of snow and fleeting sunlight, and in between showers of hail I managed to get a number of shots of this lovely mountain.

This is one of the 10 highest mountains in Ireland, and the highest on the Dingle Peninsula. I find it quite majestic in appearance. Its name comes from St. Brendan the navigator, an Irish monk who lived from 484 to 577 AD, and who many believe sailed to North America in a leather boat, with a team of other monks, many years before Christopher Columbus.  According to local legend, he spent 40 days in prayer and meditation on the top of this mountain to prepare for his journey. Already an experienced sailor, he had much knowledge from his own experience and that of other sailors he met on his journeys.

His voyage was simulated by Tim Severin in 1976 and he concluded that Brendan’s successful voyage to America was not only possible but probable. (Incidentally, Tim severin who replicated other historical journeys also, sadly passed away just last December at his home in West Cork). Some more information about St. Brendan can be seen here https://www.history.com/news/did-an-irish-monk-discover-america

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This mountain can be seen from many places on the peninsula and other places also. On this tag you can see several images of the mountain, including some paintings, on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/mount+brandon

Thank you for your visit. Keep well.

A SOFT DAY

A soft day here in Ireland usually means a calm grey drizzly day – or so I think that’s what it means. Someone else might tell you something different.

These photos are from one of those days – grey and dull. I didn’t even bother to bring my best camera, as I set out on my walk; the mobile phone was my only tool.

 

However, it wasn’t long before the clouds started to disperse, giving way to lovely soft atmospheric effects.

These cattle were in a field overlooking the beach, in Ballyferriter, Dingle Peninsula, County Kerry, in the South West of Ireland.

 

 

 

 

Is it a rainbow or a fogbow? It’s kind of in-between really.

 

 

 

 

To see photos and paintings of the Atlantic coast, in different weather conditions, please check out this tag on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/wild+atlantic+way

Thank you so much for viewing my post. I hope you will visit again. Stay safe.

 

 

DUNQUIN VIEWS

Fluffy clouds, Dunquin. Below the horizon stands the Blasket Centre, which provides information and history about the vibrant community that once lived on Great Blasket Island, the larger island on the left, below.

Just below the Blasket Centre on the coast, this very nice new viewing platform has been built on the cliff, at a cost of €2.25million+ !!! I have heard that the rusty effect alone was a substantial part of the expense.

There are stunning views of the Blasket Island group from the Dunquin coast. This is on the Dingle Peninsula, County Kerry, South West Ireland.

More coastal views from Dunquin.

These shots were taken on Dunmore Head, which is nearest to the islands. Here there is another of those World War 2 lookout shelters, of which there are several around the coast. Unfortunately they don’t look very pretty.

An Ogham Stone stands on Dunmore Head. So named because it has some of the ancient Ogham script carved on it. Ogham is an Early Medieval alphabet used to write the early Irish language, and later the Old Irish language. (Pronounced Ohm, it has a silent G). Dingle Peninsula has a large percentage of the country’s Ogham Stones.

Couminole Beach, not very obvious here because the tide is high and the sandy area is covered over. It’s a beautiful beach for a saunter and a few photos, but not so safe. Nevertheless, my walking companions went down for a swim – yes in January! I didn’t venture down on this occasion as I was in a hurry.

The steep path to Dunquin Pier can be seen in the above photo.

I have to show these shots of this beautiful horse with his long mane!

This friend of mine, Lisa, likes to feed him daily with her vegetable peelings and give him a bit of attention, as she passes on her daily walks in Dunquin.

Lisa has named him Gruaig Fhada, which simply means Long Hair. Her own hair makes them a good match.

I have never seen a horse with such a long mane before! I assume he is a shire horse.

He is rather lovely, isn’t he?

So hard to see his dark eye in that black patch. I don’t know how he can graze with that hair in his eyes!

On my website there are many photos and a few paintings of the Dunquin area, including captures of Couminole Beach which I bypassed above:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/dunquin.

Also some animals and wildlife on this tag:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c101-animals–birds-and-other-nature-photos

I appreciate your visit. I hope you like my views of Dunquin, do come again.

NOVEMBER SUNSHINE

 

A collection of photos from Ventry Beach, on a November Day in glorious warm sunshine.  Yes, sometimes we do have lovely weather in the winter here – just not as much as we might like.  But this was one of those lovely days.

Ventry Beach is a few miles from Dingle town on the Dingle Peninsula in the South West of Ireland.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The village of Ventry can be seen across the water here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have many more photos from Ventry Beach, taken at different times of the year and in different light.  Please visit my website for more photos.

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/ventry+beach

Also, I have published several previous posts here on Ventry Beach. Here are two of them:

https://helenebrennan.wordpress.com/2020/07/25/ventry-beach-2/

https://helenebrennan.wordpress.com/2019/10/22/ventry/

Thanks for viewing my photos. I hope to see you again soon.

GAP OF DUNLOE

These photos are from the Gap of Dunloe, a narrow mountain pass in County Kerry, in the South West of Ireland. It separates the MacGillycuddy’s Reeks mountain range in the west, from the Purple Mountain Group range in the east.  It’s a lovely scenic route from Killarney to the West County Cork area, an alternative to the faster N71 main road.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jaunting cars for tourists operate between 7.30am and 6.pm and can make the journey very slow and tedious for those driving cars. The jarveys (jaunting car drivers) don’t always like to enable motor cars to pass them.

However, I am sure the jaunting cars offer a great way of slowly taking in the wonderful scenery, and no doubt the jarveys are a great source of local knowledge.

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I really appreciate your visit to my post. If you would like to view more photos of the Killarney area and Iveragh Peninsula (Ring of Kerry), please visit my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c87-photographs-of-the-iveragh-peninsula-and-killarney

 

 

KILLARNEY NATIONAL PARK (Part 2)

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Continuing our drive through Killarney National Park, following on from my previous post, we three masked women in my van leave behind Muckross Park and Torc Waterfall and we pass Ladies View – the famous and popular viewing place for Killarney’s beautiful lakes. We had to pass it by because there were so many tourists there that it seemed impossible to get a parking spot. However, we stopped at several places not far beyond that, and here are the photos:

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Lily pads on the lake.

 

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In the Black Valley region.

 

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Finally we drove through the famous Gap of Dunloe.  By this time the weather turned very dark and dim and I had to employ a little help from my image editing app to inject a little life into these photos.

 

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Here are some of the jaunting cars that can be hired to tour this area, all fitted with pooh bags, since there were strong objections from many people regarding the amount of horse dung on the pathways of the Killarney National Park.  After some resistance, the jarveys (jaunting car drivers) complied with the new rule imposed by the Office of Public Works.

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We certainly enjoyed our trip through Killarney National Park, and I hope you enjoyed the trip with us also.

In case you missed Part 1 of this post, click here

There are more photos of this area on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c87-photographs-of-the-iveragh-peninsula-and-killarney

Thanks for looking. Stay safe!

 

 

 

 

 

ONE OF THOSE SUNSETS

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This one crept up on me, as they often do. I was just settling down to watch one of my favourite TV shows when I glanced out the window and saw these brillant colours in the sky. I nearly didn’t bother, but I decided to go for it, grabbed the camera and ran out and just managed to get a few shots before the colours faded.

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These bare branches make it look quite wintry. We’ve had some very windy days this summer, following on from a particularly stormy winter. Some of the trees in this area haven’t had a chance to grow or hold onto many leaves.

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Thanks for looking. Stay safe!

DINGLE TOWN

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I thought it might be good to share some photos of Dingle Town, my nearest town, in fact.  It is the main town on the Dingle Peninsula, in west County Kerry, South West Ireland.

 

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This is Main Street, Dingle. I started taking these just as shops were beginning to open up again, after lockdown, and I wished I had done it sooner when it was completely deserted – so much easier to stand wherever you want in order to capture the best views.

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No shortage of pubs in Dingle.

 

 

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Foxy John’s Pub above and Curran’s Pub below are very traditional old Irish pubs which would sell all sorts of supplies, as well as alcohol. They might sell anything from bed linen or food to gardening supplies. In Foxy John’s above you can see the vegetable seed packets and onion sets displayed.

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This photo above is Foxy John’s window, with a display of items for sale and the reflections of Curran’s Pub etc. across the road.

 

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Dingle has many excellent restaurants, great if you can afford them!!

 

 

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This is St James’ Church, Main Street, Dingle, a very modest looking building which is a venue for many concerts and is original home to the very popular Other Voices, which is shown internationally on TV.  Many famous musicians have performed here.  It is usually live streamed to the local pubs, as there are not enough seats in the building for the huge crowd that comes to Dingle for the Other Voices event.

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Below are several photos of Dykegate Lane, off Main Street.

 

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Orchard Lane, off Main Street, three photos below.

 

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I have several more photos of Dingle Town to show later, I hope you will return to see them. Thanks so much for your visit.