PAPHOS ARCHAEOLOGICAL PARK

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Cyprus is an archaeologist’s paradise. Layer upon layer of historical architectural ruins lie all over the place, and especially here in the Archaeological Park in Paphos. History has not always been kind to earlier civilisations, with foreign invasions and earthquakes destroying many wonderful buildings and works of art.

Some of the ruins here are as old as 2000 years or more, and some date to medieval times.

Here are several photos of these ruins, which include four roman palaces (with some well preserved mosaic floors), castles and amphitheatres.

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Thanks for viewing my photos. Please visit my Cyprus Category on my website:

http://www.helene-brennan.com/c857-cyprus

Also see my other posts on Cyprus here

CYPRUS, IN THE TROODOS MOUNTAINS

WINTER IN PAPHOS, CYPRUS

TIME AND TIDE – and Flaking Paint (old boat at Latchi)

THE MAGIC OF LIGHT  (Zygi Harbour, Cyprus)

 STAVROVOUNI  (Cyprus)

STAVROVOUNI 2  (CYPRUS)

APPROACHING CYPRUS

TOMBS OF THE KINGS, PAPHOS, CYPRUS

 

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TOMBS OF THE KINGS, PAPHOS, CYPRUS

The Tombs of the Kings in Paphos, Cyprus, is a very famous UNESCO Work Heritage site.  A must see for all visitors to the region. It dates back to about the 3rd century BC and it was a  burial ground for the richest, most powerful Ptolemaics of the time. Apparently, no Kings were buried there, but it was given its name because of the impressiveness of the rock hewn tombs.

Excavations began there in 1977; tomb raiders had long since removed most of the artifacts. A few pieces remained, that were inaccessible to the raiders.

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Individual niches or loculi are cut into the rock in many of the chambers

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Some of the rock cut stairs have survived well, but many are not easy for old knees nowadays.

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This is a well preserved tomb with lovely doric columns.

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Above can be seen hole in the wall made by tomb raiders to gain access to an adjoining tomb.

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Tourists building stone piles in the area. The whole place is littered with them – stone piles, that is!

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Thanks for visiting.

My earlier posts on Cyprus are:

CYPRUS, IN THE TROODOS MOUNTAINS

TIME AND TIDE – and Flaking Paint (old boat at Latchi)

WINTER IN PAPHOS, CYPRUS

APPROACHING CYPRUS

THE MAGIC OF LIGHT  (Zygi Harbour, Cyprus)

 STAVROVOUNI (Cyprus)

STAVROVOUNI 2  (CYPRUS)

Do checkout my website category on Cyprus:

http://www.helene-brennan.com/c857-cyprus

 

 

 

 

CYPRUS – Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa

Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa, in Paphos

Cyprus is an archaeologist’s paradise. There are several ancient sites, all over the country and several of them are in Paphos where I stayed, and excavations are ongoing.

Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa in Kato Paphos is a very interesting site where over the centuries from the 4th century until the 16th century, a number of buildings of Christian worship were created and destroyed.  The exact history seems very complicated, and involved Arab invasion and Earthquakes, building, destruction and rebuilding many times.

The existing church is used for worship in recent times. I didn’t think it was open while I was there, but I understand that it is beautiful inside. Worth a look judging by the photos I have seen.

Here are several photos of the current building and the ancient ruins that surround it.

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Below is a photo of an information notice at the site. If you click on it you will get a sharper, more readable version.

Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa church description-

 

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The ancient sites of Cyprus are particularly noted for their splendid mosaics, some of which you can see below.

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There are raised walkways around the site, offering great views of the mosaics and other remains, without damage to the antiquities.

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St Paul and St Barnabas are believed to have visited this place to spread Christianity in 45 AD, and it is believed that St Paul was tied to a pillar by the Roman soldiers and whipped  39 times, before the Roman Governor Sergius Paulus was converted to Christianity. The photo above shows the pillar marked with a red arrow.

Thanks so much for viewing my post. If you would like to see more of Cyprus, I have made a number of other posts on Cyprus. See the links below, and watch out for more to come.

CYPRUS, IN THE TROODOS MOUNTAINS

WINTER IN PAPHOS, CYPRUS

TIME AND TIDE – and Flaking Paint (old boat at Latchi)

THE MAGIC OF LIGHT  (Zygi Harbour, Cyprus)

 STAVROVOUNI  (Cyprus)

STAVROVOUNI 2  (CYPRUS)

APPROACHING CYPRUS

Also, do checkout my website category on Cyprus:

http://www.helene-brennan.com/c857-cyprus

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TIME AND TIDE – and Flaking Paint

This lovely but derelict old boat is dry docked at Latchi, on the western side of Cyprus. Looks like its sailing days are over, but I guess it is photographed by many passers by. Who could resist it, even knowing that there are so many other photos of it out there. I tried to find some information about its history, but couldn’t find anything.  Perhaps someone out there can enlighten me?

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Thank you for looking at my photos of this beautiful boat.

Many more photos of Cyprus are on my website:

http://www.helene-brennan.com/c857-cyprus

 

 

 

 

OCTOBER EVENING ON MURIOCH BEACH.

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To see more Dingle Peninsula photos please visit my website: http://helene-brennan.com/c25-dingle-peninsula-photos

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Please see my website for more Murioch photos: http://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/murioch

BLASKET EVENING

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The warm colors of evening sun on the ruins of Great Blasket Island. The island’s beautiful beach lies behind.

More paintings of the Blasket Islands on my website:

http://helene-brennan.com/c62-blasket-islands-paintings

TRALEE SHIP CANAL – THE HUMAN STORY

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Tralee Ship Canal, with a view of Blennerville Windmill

Some of you may be aware that I have previously posted photos of Tralee Canal, one of my regular walking and photography routes and in this post I would like to mention just a little snippet about the history in which this canal played a part.

This canal has a rich history. It was built to bring trade to the Tralee area around 1830. But my interest often focuses more on the human side of the story. It was from here that many people set sail for America in the original Jeanie Johnston tall ship during the Famine years of the 1840s to escape hunger and even death, with dreams of a new life in a faraway country, about which they knew very little. This was a dreadful time in the history of Ireland, and its repercussions still resound in the minds and hearts of the people here.

The Jeanie Johnston was a three masted barque that was originally built in Quebec, Canada, in 1847. It was purchased by a Tralee business man who used it to ship emigrants to North America and timbers back to Europe. It was particularly notable because nobody died on the emigrants voyages, unlike on other similar ships of the time, dubbed ‘coffin ships’. From 1848 – 1855 she made 16 voyages to Quebec, Baltimore and New York, taking around 47 days and carrying about 200 people on board. One can only imagine the challenges of this long and arduous journey, on the wild Atlantic Ocean.

When I walk by the canal down to the coast, I contemplate the beautiful view over Tralee Bay and the Sliabh Mish Mountains of the lovely Dingle Peninsula, and sometimes try to imagine what it must have felt like for those thousands of people who left their home country with dreams of a better life, and saw the shores of their beautiful homeland for the last time. I look at the sights they saw as they sailed out to sea, to an unknown fate, and think of their fears and hopes as they knew this might be the last time they would see their beautiful but desperate home country.

In spite of the challenges that confronted them, many achieved their dreams, and many of their descendants have become high achievers in many fields,  some even reaching the highest office of the US.  

Check out this link for a list of 20 US Presidents with Irish connections: 

http://homepage.eircom.net/~seanjmurphy/dir/pres.htm

The Jeanie Johnston is remembered as a ship of great importance to the Irish people. A replica ship was built in Blennerville, Tralee, 1998 – 2000, in a boatyard adjacent to the Blennerville Windmill. It was an ambitious project that cost nearly 14 million euro – way over budget and was sold to The Dublin Docklands Development Authority in 2005, for less than 3 million euro. Unfortunately it did not remain in Kerry, where many stakeholders incurred huge financial losses. It can now be seen moored off Custom House Quay, in Dublin. I have no photos of my own of the current Jeanie Johnston, but here’s one you can see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Jeanie_Johnston.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Jeanie_Johnston.jpg

Read more about the Jeanie Johnston on: http://www.jeaniejohnston.ie

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The canal now provides a wonderful amenity to local people who enjoy the beautiful walk along the towpath

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A rainbow seen from the canal

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Wetlands border the sides of the canal, on its route to the sea

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The emigrants may have been glad to leave the uncertain and swiftly changing Irish weather – though it has a beauty of its own

 

 

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Through the lock gates and out into Tralee Bay

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A last look up the canal after exiting the lock

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The last few yards of the canal before entering the calm waters of Tralee Bay

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Keeping the Sliabh Mish Mountains on the left, thousands of emigrants sailed out towards the wild and rough waters of the Atlantic Ocean, to reach America in approximately 47 days

 

Please take a look at my website on the Tralee Canal Category: http://helene-brennan.com/c112-tralee-canal–county-kerry–photos.