EVENING AT CLOGHER HEAD 2

Since my recent post, Evening at Clogher Head, I returned again to try and get some more photos before the light faded, and I also hoped to get a decent sunset.

Looking over towards Dunmore Head, above.

The sun was casting a weak pink light over the landscape

This is one of my favourite places on the peninsula, with wonderful vistas.

Hoping for a good sunset is like hoping to win the lottery! This was not the best one I’ve seen, but at least the sun wasn’t covered in thick cloud, as it often is here.

The Sleeping Giant, lies peacefully in the warm light of the disappearing sun.

I zoomed in close to get this one above, creating the illusion that the whole sky was ablaze with colour – which it wasn’t really.

I enjoy creating images in the evening light. There are several more from diffferent places – even different countries, to be seen on this tag:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/evening+light

Thanks for visiting. Good health to all.

EVENING AT CLOGHER HEAD

 

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Evening photos on Clogher Head (in Irish – Ceann Sraithe, Sratha, Sreatha, spellings differ). I drove over there one evening to catch the warm light on this most scenic of places on the Dingle Peninsula. My collection includes several photos from this spot, but I like to keep updating, even though I may have taken better photos there on previous occasions.

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The Blasket Islands can be seen from here, looking splendid in the warm glow of the setting sun.

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Sybil Head (Ceann Sibéal) appears at its most majestic from this viewing point.  There is something about this headland that I find quite compelling and magnetic, that I also find very difficult to capture in photos. I will go back again – and again – to try to get that quality that eludes me. I may also tell you a little story about this headland… later.

I have already mentioned on a number of occasions that the top of this headland was a film location for a Star Wars movie a few years ago.  At that time a telescope was placed at Clogher Head so that people could look over at the activities on the film set.

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Clogher Beach, The Three Sisters and Ballydavid Head, above

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To the right of Ballydavid Head is Mount Brandon, zoomed a little closer, above.

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An ancient standing stone, above and below. I would prefer not to have it exactly in the centre of the composition but the ground was so wet I couldn’t stand where I needed to. I was also in a bit of a hurry because I arrived on the scene a little too late and the sun was going down very fast.

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A slightly better composition was possible with my mobile phone, above.

 

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The sun was obviously setting behind these rocks below, as this couple appeared to be enjoying the spectacle.

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I hope you enjoyed the evening at Clogher Head. Thanks for looking. More Dingle Peninsula photos on this link:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c25–photos-of-dingle-peninsula

WILD ATLANTIC WALK

These photos were taken from Clogher Beach and the cliff walk to Cuas na nEighe from the beach. This is the place for massive, wild and wonderful waves, where many people – photographers and others go to capture the Atlantic wildness, or just to observe and enjoy it.

This rock above can send the most enormous splash way up to the sky. Photographers love to catch this moment. It always happens just when you take your eye off the ball, in a manner of speaking. I’ve seen some arrive with their tripods and camera pointed at the rock, ready for the event, and not being side-tracked by any of the lovely dancing light on the spray etc. They leave as soon as they capture it. Nothing else matters.

If you follow my posts you would have seen many other photos from this place, but as I often say, it changes every day, with the wind and the light.

Lace-like patterns swoosh towards the beach.

The island above right is Inis Tuaisceart, one of the Blasket Island group, commonly known as The Sleeping Giant, or locally known as Fear Marbh (Dead Man). It appears in many of my photos and paintings.

The Island in the distance above is another Blasket Island, the Tiaracht. It resembles the Great Skellig Rock, near the Iveragh Peninsula of South Kerry. Many people get confused with it,

I love these dancing shapes riding on top of the water, with the spray flying in the wind.

The next six images are from Cuas na nEighe, one of the most wild and wonderful places on the Dingle Peninsula, in my view.

At Cuas na nEighe, with Sybil Head in view.

These big splashes are so irresistable.

On the return towards Clogher Beach.

I hope you enjoy these coastal pics.

More Clogher Beach and Cosán na nEighe images

Thanks so much for visiting.

MOUNT EAGLE – TO THE TOP

Although I often take a short walk up Mount Eagle, for a little cardiovascular workout, it was some time since my last walk to the top. It can be very wet and waterlogged in winter time. But recently on a beautiful sunny Sunday I finally managed to get to the top again. I particularly wanted to get some new photos of the views from the top.

I was a little disappointed with the quality of the light, considering it started off very sunny and clear, but the views were starting to look a little dull and with a slight haze. I was aware that I have many better photos than these views of the Blasket Islands.

Great Blasket Island is the largest of this island group, is not only of interest because of its wild life and scenic beauty, but is also famous for the many acclaimed writers who emerged from the vibrant community of people who once lived there (until 1953) . Their written accounts of life on the island are now considered to be classics of literature, and there are translations of these books in many countries of the world.

As the path wound around to reveal the views at the other side of the mountain I was dismayed to see the reason for the lack of light – gorse fires! They were all over the place, with thick smoke hanging about all over the landscape. This didn’t bode well for views from the top. It was February 28th, the last legal date this year for farmers to burn the gorse, and being a dry sunny day – they went mad at it.

In this view showing Mount Brandon in the distance, I had to work at editing some detail into the picture.

Mount Eagle Lough, is the lake seen here. There is a path up the mountain from the lake which I have taken previously, but this was not the path taken on this occasion.

Finally, at the top, with very hazy views of the Blasket Islands, and the Skellig Rocks not visible through the veil of smoke.

I did what I could with the available views before setting off down again.

On the way down the sun had moved over the islands, giving some pleasing images.

The following photos were taken on previous trips, some of which had better visibility.

These two older images are of the Skellig Rocks, from the top of Mount Eagle, which, because of smoke, could not be seen on my recent walk. They are closer to the next Peninsula, the Iveragh Peninsula of South Kerry. The large rock on the right is Skellig Michael, on which there is an ancient monastic settlement, with several beehive shaped stone huts, built by the monks who lived there in harsh isolation from about the 6th century AD, to about the 13th century. It is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and very popular with tourists – even more so since being used as a Star Wars film location. There is some information on this link below:

https://aleteia.org/2017/12/13/luke-skywalkers-beehive-huts-and-their-spiritual-symbolism/

Below is a clearer view of the Blasket Islands from the top.

Gorse fires on an earler occasion, when strong winds prevented the smoke from settling low. The fire services are regularly called out to control these fires.

How different things can look when the light is good!

Mount Eagle is 516 meters high – a very enjoyable walk on a nice day, if the path is not too soggy or flooded. Good boots are essential.

Thanks for visiting. Do come back, please.

I have several more photos taken from Mount Eagle, in different light, at different times of the year, on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/mount+eagle

TRÁBEG, KINARD, KERRY

These photos are from Trábeg Strand, a small and often dramatic wild beach in the Kinard West area on the south side of the Dingle Peninsula.

It’s pot luck whether you get any sunshine when you go out for a walk here, and after a promising start to the morning, the sky clouded over before getting there.😕

This is also one of those wild places to which photographers are drawn for those really turbulent sea images. This was not the best day for that, with the swells of last night’s gales already dying down.

Not to be deterred, I thought, I’m here now so I’ll make the best of it. I lived close to this beach many years ago, before digital photography. I haven’t been back many times since. (Wonder where all those 35mm prints are now!) 

This is the entrance to the beach. – Very stoney at the moment. In my previous life here I observed the sand come in and go out frequently with the storms. Now it appears more stoney than ever. I was also very surprised how high the water level was, considering it was only an hour away from low tide. I expected to be able to walk around the rocks to different sections of the beach at this time, but not so. A low spring tide should be ok – next time!

 

This large stack here is a very familiar landmark, which can be seen from many high places, particularly the Conor Pass road, shown below, on another day.

The sea stack is called The Searrach (Siorrach), there are often alternative name variations and spellings here. The Searrach means foal.

Every photographer who comes here wants to get a good big splash on the Searrach. I just have to be content with the stack and no big splash pictures. The water, though rough, just wasn’t quite wild enough.  Must find those old prints!

 

 

 

 

It really didn’t feel safe on the beach, you can’t trust the ocean, when it’s rough and the beach is small. We didn’t stay for long.  I’ll definitely have to go back.

For some of my images of the wider Kerry area check out this tag for Kerry Coast Images

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/kerry+coast+images

Thanks for viewing my post, and keep safe.

 

SNOWY TOP ON MOUNT BRANDON

It was one of those cold, numb finger days, walking on the roads in the vicinity of Mount Brandon, on the Dingle Peninsula. The mountain gleamed bright white with its sugaring of snow and fleeting sunlight, and in between showers of hail I managed to get a number of shots of this lovely mountain.

This is one of the 10 highest mountains in Ireland, and the highest on the Dingle Peninsula. I find it quite majestic in appearance. Its name comes from St. Brendan the navigator, an Irish monk who lived from 484 to 577 AD, and who many believe sailed to North America in a leather boat, with a team of other monks, many years before Christopher Columbus.  According to local legend, he spent 40 days in prayer and meditation on the top of this mountain to prepare for his journey. Already an experienced sailor, he had much knowledge from his own experience and that of other sailors he met on his journeys.

His voyage was simulated by Tim Severin in 1976 and he concluded that Brendan’s successful voyage to America was not only possible but probable. (Incidentally, Tim severin who replicated other historical journeys also, sadly passed away just last December at his home in West Cork). Some more information about St. Brendan can be seen here https://www.history.com/news/did-an-irish-monk-discover-america

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This mountain can be seen from many places on the peninsula and other places also. On this tag you can see several images of the mountain, including some paintings, on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/mount+brandon

Thank you for your visit. Keep well.

LEFT OF MOUNT BRANDON

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On this walk we took a path to the left of Mount Brandon, a different side of the mountain from that my previous post. We had intended to go up Brandon but due to low cloud and skeins of foggy patches coming from the sea we thought it safer to not go to the top of the mountain.  I was secretly glad of this, to be honest, because I didn’t feel fit enough for the more challenging walk we might have taken.

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The landmarks remained the same for much of the walk, but the clouds changed all the time.

 

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This is how Brandon appeared as clouds rolled by.

 

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My guess at this story is that the farmer left this old vehicle here to use as storage for his fencing materials, and it was first vandalised by human eejits, and later attacked by multiple storms.

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These two photos were taken in the same minute, and look how quickly the picture can change in this kind of weather.

 

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We accidentally deviated from our path and arrived at this cliff edge, and sat for our picnic on the grassy slopes below, where I picked up a few sheep ticks – again!  There is Lyme disease here, but one can stay at home and be safe, or go out and take chances.  At least you can’t pass Lyme disease on to anyone else, unlike Covid-19.

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So, back down on low ground, and even on the correct route, just signposted with no obvious path.

A lovely walk with great views, and the foggy clouds even added to the beauty of the scenes. I hope you enjoyed the images.

Thanks for viewing my post. Please click on this tag for different views of Mount Brandon, photos and paintings on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/mount+brandon

KILLARNEY NATIONAL PARK (Part 1)

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These are photos from The Killarney National Park area, which I visited recently.  It was a couple of  years since I was there, so Killarney’s lovely forests, lakes and mountains made a nice change from the beaches of the Dingle Peninsula. It’s not too far to drive from home, I really should go more often.

Killarney has long been a popular tourist spot, even my parents honeymooned there, soooo many years ago.

I and 2 friends set off in my van, having three seats in front at least we could all get a good look around, besides I can get travel sick in the back seat of a car. So we of course wore masks – three masked women in the front seats of a van!  I joked that we looked like we were out on a heist!

So I hope you will enjoy joining us on our trip.

Our first stop was Muckross Park. where we passed through the gardens and woodland before moving on to Torc Waterfall, where there was more woodland, so my woodland pics got a bit mixed up.

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Torc Waterfall. The place was teeming with people. Social distancing was not easy here.

 

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This waterfall is 20 metres (66 ft) high, falling a distance of a 110 metres (360 ft) cascade, formed by the Owengarriff River as it drains from the Devil’s Punchbowl corrie lake at Mangerton Mountain.  You cannot see all of it at once, and there is a steep walk up a path to get to see it on another level.

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Above is the first level, and below is the higher level, after the steep walk up the hill.

 

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On the way back to the car park we came upon this delightful little cottage, looking like a gate lodge to some place – I don’t know where. The garden was overgrown and the house looked un-lived in, although fitted with a security alarm.

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We stood there for a while and enjoyed trying to identify the flowers, and one person even hopped in and collected a few seedheads.  Seems we were on a heist after all!

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Thanks for joining us.  I have several more photos to show of the lakes, mountains and the Gap of Dunloe. Please re-join me for the rest of the trip, within the next few days.  Here’s a taster:

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More photos of the South Kerry region and the Killarney National Park area on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c87-photographs-of-the-iveragh-peninsula-and-killarney

 

HAZY EVENING SUNLIGHT

At Clogher Beach, on the Dingle Peninsula, where dozens of people go for the turbulent water and big wave photos. Yesterday was not particularly rough, but the tide was high and the sun was low when I passed and decided to do a detour to check out the photo possibilities. I found the evening light had a lovely colour and there was an attractive watery haze in the distant atmosphere. Here are several photos of this view, with the island of Inis Tuaisceart (one of the Blasket Island group) in view. This island is commonly known as the Sleeping Giant, or locally as the Fear Marbh (Dead Man).

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Photos and paintings of Clogher Beach can be seen on this link:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/clogher+beach

I appreciate your visit. Do come again. I have a huge backlog of photos and half completed drafts which I hope to try to get published in the near future.

THE LAST CRASHES OF STORM DENNIS

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On Béal Bán Beach (White Mouth), Ballyferriter, near Dingle, in the South West Of Ireland, Storm Dennis was beginning to ease, though still pretty fierce, with wild squalls arising frequently. In the above photo, Mount Brandon enjoys a few fleeting patches of sunlight.

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This is a relatively sheltered bay, while above, the humpy, lumpy mountainous shapes on the horizon are actually huge ocean swells.

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The rock in these two photos is known as Carraig Dubh (Black Rock).

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And then came the rainbow. I waited in my van for a heavy shower to pass, and hoped for a rainbow. I nearly missed it – it was so fleeting.

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When I was a child, I was told that if I found the end of a rainbow there would be a pot of gold there.  I frequently see complete rainbows with both ends in Kerry, but no gold!  I once drove into the end of a rainbow on a motorway.  It disintegrated as I approached. I had a lottery ticket already purchased for that evening’s draw.  I thought surely………. no such luck!

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More seascape photos can be seen on this link:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/seascape+photos

Thanks for visiting my post. I hope you have enjoyed it.