DINGLE MARINA ON A CALM DAY

WP_20160617_06_08_51_Pro__highres

This is at Dingle Harbour, on the Dingle Peninsula in County Kerry, Ireland.

View more Kerry Coast images from this link:

 http://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/kerry+coast+images

Advertisements

LAST NIGHT’S WEST KERRY SUNSET

sunset and wild roses_9307Yes, I have taken many photos of sunsets, many of which are previously posted in my blog.  https://helenebrennan.wordpress.com/tag/sunset/  But it’s so very hard to resist, when you see from your window the red-golden tree tops in the garden, and you know this is a special one – again. These special sunsets don’t happen often, but they happen a number of times in the year.

DSC_9070

It isn’t always convenient to be out taking photos at these ‘special’ times. Last night, for instance I had just returned from a strenuous row on the sea, and wanted nothing more than to sit and relax.  I tried to ignore the reddening of the sky outside, but eventually I had to just run outside before the colours disappeared.  As usual in these situations, I just grabbed the images, no time for the tripod or anything like that.

DSC_9308-2

Sunset Pictures on my website: http://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/sunset

THANK YOU FOR LOOKING AT MY BLOG

WEST KERRY SUNSETS (2)

blaskets-from-slea-head

Blasket Islands

 

 

adobephotoshopexpress_244382637d524d2697072b2ec839e87c

Emlagh, Ballyferriter

 

dsc_6723-2

Emlagh, Ballyferriter

 

dscf0163

Mid-summer sunset at Ceann Seatha

 

 

ventry sand patterns 2

Ventry Beach

 

 

Lots more photos from the Dingle Peninsula, West Kerry, on my website:

http://www.helene-brennan.com/c25-dingle-peninsula-photos

TIME CHANGES EVERYTHING – AT COURTOWN

 

DSC_5861

It’s not often that I get across to the east coast of this country nowadays, but I recently made a short visit to Courtown, in County Wexford. The weather wasn’t great, the sunshine was scarce and the light was dull, but I grabbed a few opportunities to capture some images

It must be said that Courtown once had the most perfect beach in the world – with a marvellous expanse of dry, soft, clean, golden sand. The water depth was perfect and safe for swimming. Admittedly, it didn’t have the fabulous scenery of the Kerry beaches, with which I am now very familiar, but the quality of the beach itself was second to none. Sunshine was always more plentiful in that part of the country too. I have no photos of what it was like before – but OMG – look what is is now!

DSC_5725

What happened to all the lovely sand?

It’s an understatement to say that erosion has taken its toll. Tons of boulders have been deposited to ‘protect’ the coastline. Time has shown once again that nothing stays the same.

DSC_5728

Bathing still continues between the piles of boulders

It’s good to see that there are still some gaps in the mountains of boulders, where families can enjoy the sun, sand and sea.

DSC_5815

Weather shows its visual charms

 

DSC_5747

A glimpse of normality

DSC_5755-2

Off shore activities are definitely more popular now

DSC_5729

Less beach – more sea. You win some, you lose some!

DSC_5759

Swimmers still enjoy the beach

 

DSC_5874

The wood by the beach

The opening of woodland trails do compensate in part for the loss of so much beach

DSC_5820

The beach, viewed from the wood

DSC_5869

The woodland trail is really lovely

DSC_5776-2

View of the woodland from the beach

DSC_5786

Storm torn trees. Winter storms have wreaked havoc on them also

But alas, the woodland was not safe either from the ferocious storms of last winter.

DSC_5792

Graffiti on a storm felled tree

Graffiti on this storm felled tree on the beach echoes my thoughts about transience and change, although I could not read the full sentence that once was there.

DSC_5731

Great for the stove – if I could carry  it home!

DSC_5788-2 copy

I quite liked these natural sculptures that have landed on the beach

DSC_5850

More of nature’s offerings

DSC_5848-3

Many pieces already chopped – presumably for the home fires

WP_20160712_21_13_50_Pro__highres

The last rays of sun creep up along the RNLI boathouse

WP_20160712_21_11_27_Pro__highres

Evening walk as the sun goes down

DSC_5908

Something for all ages in Courtown

DSC_5917

Even the dodgems look different

Please check out my other photos of County Wexford on my website:

http://helene-brennan.com/c97-photos-of–county-wexford-

RURAL LIVING – JOYS AND COMPROMISES

AdobePhotoshopExpress_92ff35747d6d44a3b62cfc607eb216cf-2

Yes there are so many benefits that I enjoy and appreciate about living on the wonderful Dingle Peninsula.  I love the helpful friendly people, country roads, amazing beaches, glorious sunsets, magnificent walks, clean air, space, big garden, little shops and big ones……………..

wine strand view_16_19_31

My only complaint is my lack of decent Broadband. It would be nice to be able to view more blogs and like them etc., but some days it’s just too slow to view others’ blogs, especially those with image content.

But thankfully, today I have managed do do this post and upload a few photos, I hope you will enjoy them.

DSC_1701wp

DSC_1533 wp

robin DSC_4713

Please visit my website: http://www.helene-brennan.com

STAR WARS IN KERRY

sceilig watercolour copy

I have previously written about the film Ryan’s Daughter, which was largely shot on the Dingle Peninsula, and how it brought the beauty of the place to the attention of the world and stimulated the tourism industry in the area.

Not only tourism was stimulated, several other movies followed, which were also partly shot in County Kerry. Here are a few:

Star Wars: The Force Awakens 2015

The Field (1990)

Far and Away (1992)

Harry Potter and the Half-blood Prince (2009)

Excalibur (1981)

The most recent Star Wars movie – The Force Awakens was partly shot at Skellig Michael, a World Heritage site, off the coast of the Iveragh Peninsula, South Kerry, amid much controversy regarding the damage they may do to the ecology and the antiquities on the island.

sceiligs04

The Skellig Rocks are two rather spectacular looking tall craggy rocks rising up from the Wild Atlantic Ocean; there is also a third but smaller rock known as The Lemon. Skellig Michael, or Great Skellig, 714 feet tall, is an ancient monastic site where in the sixth to eighth centuries AD, a community of monks built their monastery – a number of beehive shaped stone dwellings and oratories, and lived their lives there, in considerable hardship and isolation 12 miles from the mainland of Ireland.

DSCF0021 copy

Well now – it seems we will have a major film crew in this area again shortly, as  Disney Lucasfilm prepare for shooting their next Star Wars movie at Sybil Head (Ceann Sibéal).

DSCF0135 wp

Sybil Head, the site chosen for the next movie, is another majestically beautiful place, having a commanding, yet magical presence, adjacent to a collection of other stunning iconic landmarks to be seen from the roadside of the famous Slea Head Drive from Dingle.

To help you locate these peninsulas: The south west of Ireland has three magnificently beautiful peninsulas. Two of them are in County Kerry – the Dingle Peninsula, and the Iveragh Peninsula (Ring of Kerry), going south, and the most southerly one is in County Cork – the Beara Peninsula (West Cork).

More information can be found on:

http://www.worldheritageireland.ie/skellig-michael/

http://entertainment.ie/cinema/news/Pic-Disney-Lucasfilm-are-heading-back-to-Kerry-to-film-part-of-Star-Wars-Episode-VIII/377968.htm

Please also visit my website for more images of the Skelligs and Sybil Head