HAZY EVENING SUNLIGHT

At Clogher Beach, on the Dingle Peninsula, where dozens of people go for the turbulent water and big wave photos. Yesterday was not particularly rough, but the tide was high and the sun was low when I passed and decided to do a detour to check out the photo possibilities. I found the evening light had a lovely colour and there was an attractive watery haze in the distant atmosphere. Here are several photos of this view, with the island of Inis Tuaisceart (one of the Blasket Island group) in view. This island is commonly known as the Sleeping Giant, or locally as the Fear Marbh (Dead Man).

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Photos and paintings of Clogher Beach can be seen on this link:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/clogher+beach

I appreciate your visit. Do come again. I have a huge backlog of photos and half completed drafts which I hope to try to get published in the near future.

THE LAST CRASHES OF STORM DENNIS

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On Béal Bán Beach (White Mouth), Ballyferriter, near Dingle, in the South West Of Ireland, Storm Dennis was beginning to ease, though still pretty fierce, with wild squalls arising frequently. In the above photo, Mount Brandon enjoys a few fleeting patches of sunlight.

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This is a relatively sheltered bay, while above, the humpy, lumpy mountainous shapes on the horizon are actually huge ocean swells.

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The rock in these two photos is known as Carraig Dubh (Black Rock).

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And then came the rainbow. I waited in my van for a heavy shower to pass, and hoped for a rainbow. I nearly missed it – it was so fleeting.

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When I was a child, I was told that if I found the end of a rainbow there would be a pot of gold there.  I frequently see complete rainbows with both ends in Kerry, but no gold!  I once drove into the end of a rainbow on a motorway.  It disintegrated as I approached. I had a lottery ticket already purchased for that evening’s draw.  I thought surely………. no such luck!

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More seascape photos can be seen on this link:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/seascape+photos

Thanks for visiting my post. I hope you have enjoyed it.

BEAUTY AND THE BEASTS

The storms are coming think and fast these days. Fierce though they are, they provide a wonderful magnetic attraction, particularly around our coasts, for along with the beasts that they are, they create powerful spectacles in the form of giant waves, massive splashes and magnificent movement.

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Thank you so much for viewing my post. If you like stormy sea images, check out this tag on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/rough+sea

BIG PAINTINGS

Atlantic Movement

Atlantic Movement

These are quite large paintings. Oil on canvas, 150 x 100 cms (60 x 40 inches approximately), inspired by the wonderful coastal imagery of the Dingle Peninsula, South West Ireland.

I think that large paintings are difficult to show sympathetically on a website. The larger the painting, the greater the reduction of the image. This has the effect of making the image look much more tightly painted than it is in reality. It’s always worth bearing that in mind when viewing paintings on the internet. These here can be viewed much larger if you click them, and you may still be able to open out the image and see the style of the brush-marks more clearly, and be able to evaluate the freedom of the style or the discipline that is employed.

I have been sitting on these for several months, in a manner of speaking. This is the first time I have shown them on my blog. They are on my website on this page:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c863-new-paintings-2018—2020

I needed to wait for at least 6 months before applying varnish. Many painters are not aware of the need to wait and may apply the varnish too soon. As yet most of these are not varnished, except the one I have sold (Blasket Islands).

The purpose of varnish is to protect the picture, but if it is applied too soon it fuses into the paint below, and cannot in the future be removed if desired. It might never need to be removed in the life of the picture, but it’s best to follow good practice, as the varnish yellows with age.

Some painters think it’s best to not use varnish at all, as it can create problems of its own. Large paintings in particular are difficult to varnish evenly. It’s not strictly necessary to varnish, and many painters use an oiling out technique to bring up the colours and create an even sheen on the picture. I sometimes do this myself. An oil painting, once completely dry will have a washable surface and as long as it is kept in a clean unpolluted environment there should be no real problems. Most people do not now smoke inside their homes, and this has removed the main polluting agent in one’s home.

Steamy Atlantic Spray

Steamy Atlantic Spray

 

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Rushing Wave in the Wind 9172Rushing Wave in the Wind

 

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West Coast

 

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Blasket Islands

 

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View of Mainland from Great Blasket Island

I would be delighted to respond to any questions that anyone would have. Please enquire through my website.

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c863-new-paintings-2018—2020

For those of you who might be in my area, I have a gallery, showing these large paintings and several smaller paintings. Here is the big paintings room. Directions on Google. I look forward to meeting you.104718 gallery big paintings

 

FOYNES PORT

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Occasionally, I pass through the port town of Foynes, County Limerick, on the west coast of Ireland. I’m usually in a hurry through, with a long journey to complete and don’t have time to stop. I always think to myself that this looks such an interesting place and I would like to explore and capture the views and interesting buildings. However I managed to grab a few shots on a couple of these journeys. Good light was fleeting, and time was short, but here are some of the images I caught.

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Foynes is on the Shannon Estuary, and is the second biggest port in Ireland. It has a very interesting maritime and aviation history, and there is a Flying Boat and Maritime Museum there, which regrettably, I haven’t managed to  see yet.

Probably the most interesting thing about Foynes is its Flying Boat history. The flying boats were operational from about 1937 up until 1942, when nearby Shannon Airport was opened, and there was no longer a need for flying boats there. You can read more about Foynes’ Flying Boat history on this website: https://www.historyireland.com/troubles-in-ni/ni-1920-present/the-flying-boats-of-foynes/

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My main interest is to create beautiful and interesting images, so even the above industrial scene has beauty when the warm glow of the late afternoon sun lights up these structures and the deep blue of the Shannon Estuarial waters are contrasted against them.

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The two shots above show Foynes Island

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Foynes railway station, above, now unused – usual story.

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I remain hopeful that I will get some more photos of this interesting looking town, some day when I’m not passing through in a hurry.

These photos and a few others of Foynes are available for sale on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c866-county-limerick

Thank you for viewing my post.

VENTRY

Here is Ventry Beach, one of my several local beaches.

Some of these photos were taken in the summer, and some in September. I find it hard to keep on top of publishing my recent pics.

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Ventry Beach is a few miles from Dingle town, on the Dingle Peninsula, in the South West of Ireland. I have many more photos of the Dingle Peninsula on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c25–photos-of-dingle-peninsula

Paintings of the Dingle Peninsula on:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c15-paintings-of-the-dingle-peninsula

More photos of Ventry Beach on this tag:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/ventry+beach

Thanks for looking.

SYMPHONY ON SEA, Lorenzo Movement

Following on my earlier post  ‘Symphony on sea atlantic movement‘ The following photos were taken the day after Storm Lorenzo last week. I stayed indoors on the day, following the general advice, and it was actually a bit of a non event in this area, not at all as bad as expected. When I went out the next day there was still a respectable amount of turbulence on the water, which I attempted to capture in my photos. I look for movement with pattern, colour and tonal contrasts.

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