MORE THAN A WEEK

corona times

It’s more than a week now into partial shutdown and social isolation. it’s good to live in a place where one can still walk and enjoy the fresh air and lovely views.

These photos are on Béal Bán (White Mouth), Ballyferriter, on the Dingle Peninsula, County Kerry.

DSC_2238 beal ban people

Just thought I’m mention again that the above rocky ridge, Sybil Head (Ceann Sibéal), was a film location of Star Wars – The Last Jedi, during 2016.

Covid-19 doesn’t stop the rainbows. I unfortunately missed the best brilliance of this rainbow while on the long winding road from the main road to the beach, but here are some captures of it, sorry if they look a little like some previously posted shots – same place but different rainbow.

DSC_2137 beal ban rainbow

 

DSC_2177 beal ban rainbow

I noticed a runner stop to look at a bird near the water’s edge on the beach. I stopped to enquire was there something wrong with the bird and he informed me that it was a fulmar, which normally spends all its life at sea and has very limited walking skills. I guess it needs to propel itself in water in order to fly up. I hope it survived the several dogs that were running free on the beach. They know nothing about social distancing!

DSC_2256 fulmar on the beach

As I went on my way I realised that I may have slightly transgressed the recommended social distance in that conversation. So difficult to remember all the time, in this place where people are normally very sociable!

DSC_2228 beal ban with bird

 

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DSC_2186 beal ban rainbow

St. Patrick’s Day on Tuesday demonstrated the real spirit of the people in the country, who created their own mini parades, in their back gardens with their children, and with musicians in some cases, and recorded them of course!

This week brought some very amusing corona virus inspired videos to my phone, including one of a couple of guys planting toilet rolls! That did make me laugh out loud.

It was no surprise that there were no toilet rolls at the supermarket, but I got everything I needed. Only one person allowed in the pharmacy at one time.

No swimming, no pub music sessions (I play flute), no weekly gathering of musicians at my house.

My own gallery is closed to visitors, but trading online or by phone is still an option.

This is just a microcosm of Corona virus imposed changes in my tiny insignificant world.  But the real concern is the health of individuals affected by the virus, and then for the economy and the loss of jobs and stress and strain on people’s lives, all over the world. 

But nature continues to provide us with its wonderful gifts. Here are two photos of this week’s sunsets, which I have also covered in my previous two posts.

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The birds are still singing in the garden. They are still fluttering around the bird feeder. I found some small but tasty broccoli florets that had been developing quietly and gave me a nice surprise. I had written off the broccoli plants! The wind has been so fierce and persistent this past few months.

Good health to you all and your dearest.

 


HAPPY ST. PATRICKS DAY

DSC_1670 Mount Brandon from Béal Bán

This will be a quiet St. Patricks Day. But we still have the beaches and the hills to enjoy, (weather permitting), but even sitting in one’s car looking out at the waves and perhaps the occasional rainbow can be a soothing, mindful experience. It will definitely be a different St. Patricks day for all of us, in many countries of the world; no parades, no parties, no going to the pub, no big social gatherings… many of us practising social isolation, for fear of catching or spreading Covid-19..

Below is a photo I took one December, of Croagh Patrick, in County Mayo, locally called The Reek. Named after St. Patrick, where he fasted for 40 days, it’s now a mountain of pilgrimage – hundreds of people climbing it in bare feet every year.  The mountain in the shot above is Mount Brandon, our local big mountain, the highest on the Dingle Peninsula, here in County Kerry in the South West of Ireland.

croagh patrick

It is believed that St. Patrick brought Christianity to Ireland, in the 5th century AD, although there appears to be some evidence now that it was here before Patrick’s time.  But still St. Patrick is celebrated by Irish people every year in many countries of the world. All so different this year.  But I wish you all good health and happiness on this St. Patrick’s Day 2020.

 

STILL STORMY 2

DSC_2065 ballinrannig

These photos were taken shortly before those in my previous post STILL STORMY. It was very windy. I was at Ballinrannig, Ballyferriter, on the Dingle Peninsula, South West Ireland. All these photos were taken from close to the small car park, viewing all around from there.

DSC_2096 ballinrannig big wave splash

 

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DSC_2083 ballinrannig wave with black rock

 

DSC_2066 ballinrannig

 

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DSC_2061 ballinrannig black rock

 

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DSC_2078 birds at ballinrannig

 

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For more Ballyferriter images, here’s a Ballyferriter tag-link to my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/ballyferriter

Thanks for your visit. I hope you have enjoyed my pics.

STILL STORMY

DSC_2001 clogher

The storms seem relentless this year. These shots are from Clogher Beach, on the Dingle Peninsula, South West Ireland, a favourite spot for rough sea fans.

DSC_1975 flurry of foam clogher

With a powerful wind blowing from the sea, the biggest challenge was keeping the lens free of the salty sea spray. So many potentially lovely photos ruined by wet blobs on the lens, and the salty water certainly won’t do my camera or lens any good. On this occasion there was continual wet spray.  In the above photo, I caught one of the frequent flurries of foam blobs that blew up from the crashing waves.

DSC_1968 clogher splash

It was difficult to get any colour into these photos. I tried converting to black and white but in the end went back to the coloured pics, slightly strange though they may appear.

DSC_1934 - sleeping giant clogher

 

DSC_1949 clogher and sleeping giant

 

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DSC_1957 clogher sleeping giant

 

 

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DSC_2052 sleeping giant clogher bw

Moving around to the cliff at the right hand side of the beach, you can see the shape of the beach with it’s foamy frothy water (below). It was shortly before a very high tide.

DSC_1992 Clogher Beach

You can see paintings and photos of the Clogher Beach area on the following link to my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/clogher+beach

I appreciate your visit, thank you.

BEAUTY AND THE BEASTS

The storms are coming think and fast these days. Fierce though they are, they provide a wonderful magnetic attraction, particularly around our coasts, for along with the beasts that they are, they create powerful spectacles in the form of giant waves, massive splashes and magnificent movement.

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DSC_9873 sybil Head

 

DSC_1479 cosan na neighe

 

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Thank you so much for viewing my post. If you like stormy sea images, check out this tag on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/rough+sea

BIG PAINTINGS

Atlantic Movement

Atlantic Movement

These are quite large paintings. Oil on canvas, 150 x 100 cms (60 x 40 inches approximately), inspired by the wonderful coastal imagery of the Dingle Peninsula, South West Ireland.

I think that large paintings are difficult to show sympathetically on a website. The larger the painting, the greater the reduction of the image. This has the effect of making the image look much more tightly painted than it is in reality. It’s always worth bearing that in mind when viewing paintings on the internet. These here can be viewed much larger if you click them, and you may still be able to open out the image and see the style of the brush-marks more clearly, and be able to evaluate the freedom of the style or the discipline that is employed.

I have been sitting on these for several months, in a manner of speaking. This is the first time I have shown them on my blog. They are on my website on this page:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c863-new-paintings-2018—2020

I needed to wait for at least 6 months before applying varnish. Many painters are not aware of the need to wait and may apply the varnish too soon. As yet most of these are not varnished, except the one I have sold (Blasket Islands).

The purpose of varnish is to protect the picture, but if it is applied too soon it fuses into the paint below, and cannot in the future be removed if desired. It might never need to be removed in the life of the picture, but it’s best to follow good practice, as the varnish yellows with age.

Some painters think it’s best to not use varnish at all, as it can create problems of its own. Large paintings in particular are difficult to varnish evenly. It’s not strictly necessary to varnish, and many painters use an oiling out technique to bring up the colours and create an even sheen on the picture. I sometimes do this myself. An oil painting, once completely dry will have a washable surface and as long as it is kept in a clean unpolluted environment there should be no real problems. Most people do not now smoke inside their homes, and this has removed the main polluting agent in one’s home.

Steamy Atlantic Spray

Steamy Atlantic Spray

 

atlantic splash 9169Atlantic Splash

 

Rushing Wave in the Wind 9172Rushing Wave in the Wind

 

DSC_9173 west coast

West Coast

 

DSC_9281 blasket Islands

Blasket Islands

 

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View of Mainland from Great Blasket Island

I would be delighted to respond to any questions that anyone would have. Please enquire through my website.

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c863-new-paintings-2018—2020

For those of you who might be in my area, I have a gallery, showing these large paintings and several smaller paintings. Here is the big paintings room. Directions on Google. I look forward to meeting you.104718 gallery big paintings

 

AGIOS SPYRIDON

rrem

This was a boat to fall in love with. I did so in December 2018, when I stumbled upon it in Latsi (Latchi), Cyprus. It was such a beautiful old wooden fishing boat, dry docked, and totally neglected. It seemed so wrong that such a lovely piece of craftsmanship  would now be so uncared for, although you can be sure that thousands of tourists have passed by and like myself have taken many, many photos.

Last year I posted some of these photos here after my trip to Cyprus. I didn’t know anything at all about this boat at the time and didn’t manage to find any information. I didn’t even know that it was named Agios Spyridon

My earlier post can be seen here: https://helenebrennan.wordpress.com/2019/01/15/time-and-tide-and-flaking-paint/

On my most recent trip to Cyprus in December 2019, I went to take a look to see how this old lady was getting on. Alas, I found it in the process of being demolished. There were some local photographers there to record it  and I got the impression that it was a bit of an event.

DSC_0514 agios spyridos

 

DSC_0521 agios spyridos

 

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Since my return home I did some more research and was delighted to find some information about it. It seems she was built in 1950 on Crete and  was one of a type  of fishing vessels known as karavoskaro.

On dry land since 2004, the boat was supposed to have been restored but unfortunately that didn’t happen and total negligence forced a decision to have her demolished. Considered to be worthy of being listed as a monument of nautical heritage, it has been digitally recorded in a joint project between the University of Cyprus and the Cyprus Institute.

The 3d image, which you can pull around with your mouse and view from all sides  can be seen here:

http://ephemera.cyi.ac.cy/sites/ephemera/3D1/Latsi_Ag_Spyridon.html

I am familiar with 3d photography as I too was involved with a project to digitally record ancient monuments in my area.  http://www.corcadhuibhne3d.ie/sites.php  A number of these sites were recorded by myself. This development in imaging is a brilliant tool we now have to record any objects that would otherwise disappear from us forever. We may have had photos, but to view objects in 3d is so amazing.

If you click on any image here you will get a better quality view.

Thank you for visiting my post.