STILL STORMY 2

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These photos were taken shortly before those in my previous post STILL STORMY. It was very windy. I was at Ballinrannig, Ballyferriter, on the Dingle Peninsula, South West Ireland. All these photos were taken from close to the small car park, viewing all around from there.

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For more Ballyferriter images, here’s a Ballyferriter tag-link to my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/ballyferriter

Thanks for your visit. I hope you have enjoyed my pics.

STILL STORMY

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The storms seem relentless this year. These shots are from Clogher Beach, on the Dingle Peninsula, South West Ireland, a favourite spot for rough sea fans.

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With a powerful wind blowing from the sea, the biggest challenge was keeping the lens free of the salty sea spray. So many potentially lovely photos ruined by wet blobs on the lens, and the salty water certainly won’t do my camera or lens any good. On this occasion there was continual wet spray.  In the above photo, I caught one of the frequent flurries of foam blobs that blew up from the crashing waves.

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It was difficult to get any colour into these photos. I tried converting to black and white but in the end went back to the coloured pics, slightly strange though they may appear.

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Moving around to the cliff at the right hand side of the beach, you can see the shape of the beach with it’s foamy frothy water (below). It was shortly before a very high tide.

DSC_1992 Clogher Beach

You can see paintings and photos of the Clogher Beach area on the following link to my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/clogher+beach

I appreciate your visit, thank you.

BEAUTY AND THE BEASTS

The storms are coming think and fast these days. Fierce though they are, they provide a wonderful magnetic attraction, particularly around our coasts, for along with the beasts that they are, they create powerful spectacles in the form of giant waves, massive splashes and magnificent movement.

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Thank you so much for viewing my post. If you like stormy sea images, check out this tag on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/rough+sea

BIG PAINTINGS

Atlantic Movement

Atlantic Movement

These are quite large paintings. Oil on canvas, 150 x 100 cms (60 x 40 inches approximately), inspired by the wonderful coastal imagery of the Dingle Peninsula, South West Ireland.

I think that large paintings are difficult to show sympathetically on a website. The larger the painting, the greater the reduction of the image. This has the effect of making the image look much more tightly painted than it is in reality. It’s always worth bearing that in mind when viewing paintings on the internet. These here can be viewed much larger if you click them, and you may still be able to open out the image and see the style of the brush-marks more clearly, and be able to evaluate the freedom of the style or the discipline that is employed.

I have been sitting on these for several months, in a manner of speaking. This is the first time I have shown them on my blog. They are on my website on this page:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c863-new-paintings-2018—2020

I needed to wait for at least 6 months before applying varnish. Many painters are not aware of the need to wait and may apply the varnish too soon. As yet most of these are not varnished, except the one I have sold (Blasket Islands).

The purpose of varnish is to protect the picture, but if it is applied too soon it fuses into the paint below, and cannot in the future be removed if desired. It might never need to be removed in the life of the picture, but it’s best to follow good practice, as the varnish yellows with age.

Some painters think it’s best to not use varnish at all, as it can create problems of its own. Large paintings in particular are difficult to varnish evenly. It’s not strictly necessary to varnish, and many painters use an oiling out technique to bring up the colours and create an even sheen on the picture. I sometimes do this myself. An oil painting, once completely dry will have a washable surface and as long as it is kept in a clean unpolluted environment there should be no real problems. Most people do not now smoke inside their homes, and this has removed the main polluting agent in one’s home.

Steamy Atlantic Spray

Steamy Atlantic Spray

 

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Rushing Wave in the Wind 9172Rushing Wave in the Wind

 

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West Coast

 

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Blasket Islands

 

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View of Mainland from Great Blasket Island

I would be delighted to respond to any questions that anyone would have. Please enquire through my website.

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c863-new-paintings-2018—2020

For those of you who might be in my area, I have a gallery, showing these large paintings and several smaller paintings. Here is the big paintings room. Directions on Google. I look forward to meeting you.104718 gallery big paintings

 

AGIOS SPYRIDON

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This was a boat to fall in love with. I did so in December 2018, when I stumbled upon it in Latsi (Latchi), Cyprus. It was such a beautiful old wooden fishing boat, dry docked, and totally neglected. It seemed so wrong that such a lovely piece of craftsmanship  would now be so uncared for, although you can be sure that thousands of tourists have passed by and like myself have taken many, many photos.

Last year I posted some of these photos here after my trip to Cyprus. I didn’t know anything at all about this boat at the time and didn’t manage to find any information. I didn’t even know that it was named Agios Spyridon

My earlier post can be seen here: https://helenebrennan.wordpress.com/2019/01/15/time-and-tide-and-flaking-paint/

On my most recent trip to Cyprus in December 2019, I went to take a look to see how this old lady was getting on. Alas, I found it in the process of being demolished. There were some local photographers there to record it  and I got the impression that it was a bit of an event.

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Since my return home I did some more research and was delighted to find some information about it. It seems she was built in 1950 on Crete and  was one of a type  of fishing vessels known as karavoskaro.

On dry land since 2004, the boat was supposed to have been restored but unfortunately that didn’t happen and total negligence forced a decision to have her demolished. Considered to be worthy of being listed as a monument of nautical heritage, it has been digitally recorded in a joint project between the University of Cyprus and the Cyprus Institute.

The 3d image, which you can pull around with your mouse and view from all sides  can be seen here:

http://ephemera.cyi.ac.cy/sites/ephemera/3D1/Latsi_Ag_Spyridon.html

I am familiar with 3d photography as I too was involved with a project to digitally record ancient monuments in my area.  http://www.corcadhuibhne3d.ie/sites.php  A number of these sites were recorded by myself. This development in imaging is a brilliant tool we now have to record any objects that would otherwise disappear from us forever. We may have had photos, but to view objects in 3d is so amazing.

If you click on any image here you will get a better quality view.

Thank you for visiting my post.

AERIAL PHOTOS 2

Leaving Dublin Airport early on a December morning, below.

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When travelling, I really love to pass the time taking photos out through the aircraft’s window.  For those who will only accept technical perfection, this is not for them. Scratched windows, sometimes with condensation and reflections do not give a perfect image, and often, depending on the position of the sun there will appear  a spotty effect on the images. But in general I’m happy with a pleasing image and to gain that I’m often happy to forfeit technical perfection.

Below are mountains in Europe, I guess the Alps.

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Spot the plane in the centre of the picture below.

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Arrival at Cyprus below, showing one of 108 dams and reservoirs in Cyprus.

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The following photos are views on the flight from Kolkata to Aizawl, Mizoram, via Imphal

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Thanks so much for viewing my photos. If you would like to see more aerial photos please take a look at my earlier post:

https://helenebrennan.wordpress.com/2019/03/26/aerial-photos/

Also, there are more photos on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c22-aerial-images

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TRIPPING AROUND THE BLASKET ISLANDS

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The Blasket Islands seen here from Mount Eagle, is a group of six islands off the Dingle Peninsula, in the South West of Ireland. Below are some photos of the islands taken from a boat, and on some of the islands.

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Above on the left is the iconic Sleeping Giant, Inis Tuaisceart, which locals also call the Fear Marbh (Dead Man). There are also as many different spellings as names of the island! He loses his sleeping man shape when viewed from the other side.

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Above and below, the amazing Cathedral Rocks of Inis na Bró on the right, and on the left is Inis Tiaracht (Tearacht). The spellings of these islands varies.

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Another view of Inis na Bró, below, as seen from Inis Vickillane. A little of Great Blasket Island is poking in on the right.

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Also from Inis Vickillane, this is Inis Tiaracht again. A rocky island, the most westerly in Ireland, with a lighthouse (operational since 1870) and several houses, where three lighthouse keepers once lived, in amazingly challenging conditions, and kept goats, hens and rabbits. They even managed to grow vegetables. Some of the settlement can be seen on the above photo on the left, but the lighthouse is just around the corner.

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The Sleeping Giant again, looking unrecognisable in this view from Inis Vickillane. (Above).

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The famous Great Blasket above, with the mainland in the distance.

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Still on Inis Vickillane, above is another view of The Tiaracht (left) and Inis na Bró (right).

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Above and below, the remains of an early eighth century monastic settlement founded by St. Mocheallog on Inis Vickillane. This island was inhabited by a few families in more recent centuries. It’s hard to imagine how they lived on this wild island, which has very difficult access, being very dependent on weather and tide conditions. They would not have been able to hop in and out of boats for fishing any time they felt like it. The last permanent residents, the Ó Dálaighs raised a family of 10 children and were sole inhabitants on the island until the 1950s – from what date I don’t know. Currently the island is privately owned, and is used by the owners for holidays. I was lucky to gain an opportunity to visit the island briefly.

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The next several photos are on Great Blasket Island, which is the largest of this island group, renowned for its abundant wildlife, particularly sea birds, its scenic beauty, and its interesting history. It is also famous for the many acclaimed writers who emerged from the vibrant community of people who once lived there. Their written accounts of life on the island are now considered to be classics of literature, and there are translations of these books in many countries of the world. The once thriving community of 150 or more people declined, as emigration, mainly to the USA, took its toll on the population, and when the Island was finally officially vacated in 1953 there were only 22 people living on the Island. The islanders homes fairly quickly fell to ruin, only a few of them have been maintained by their owners who use them for summer visits.

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There is a beautiful beach on the island.

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Walking on the heathery ridge of the island looking towards the mainland.

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Ruins of the some of the homes on the island.

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The above lovingly preserved house, still in the ownership of descendants of Island inhabitants, is where Méini the Blasket nurse and midwife lived, with her husband with whom she eloped when she was 19, and he a widower, until after his death when she moved back to the mainland.

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I believe this bell was used in the 1970 film ‘Ryan’s Daughter’, filmed on the Dingle Peninsula, but I’ve no information about its origin.

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Another view of The Sleeping Giant, this time from Great Blasket.

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The small island above, close to Great Blasket is Beginis. Flat and windy, probably only ever used for grazing animals.

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Inis Vickillane, with the late afternoon sun shimmering on the water. Below is Inis Vickillane and Inis na Bró.

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Returning to Dingle Harbour with the wash of the boat behind us. Dingle lighthouse can be seen on the left.

Thanks for viewing my post. If you would like to see more Blasket Island images please visit my website.

Photos: http://www.helene-brennan.com/c53-photographs-of-the-blasket-islands-

Paintings: http://www.helene-brennan.com/c62-blasket-islands-paintings