STAR WARS IN KERRY

This post was updated in November 2017.

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I have previously written about the film Ryan’s Daughter, which was largely shot on the Dingle Peninsula, and how it brought the beauty of the place to the attention of the world and stimulated the tourism industry in the area.

Not only tourism was stimulated, several other movies followed, which were also partly shot in County Kerry. Here is a list of some movies shot in Kerry since Ryan’s Daughter:

Star Wars: The Last Jedi 2016

Star Wars: The Force Awakens 2015

The Field (1990)

Far and Away (1992)

Harry Potter and the Half-blood Prince (2009)

Excalibur (1981)

The most recent Star Wars movie – The Last Jedi was partly shot on Sybil Head (Ceann Sibéal) on the stunning Dingle Peninsula.

 

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Sybil Head, is a majestically beautiful place, having a commanding, yet magical presence, adjacent to a collection of other stunning iconic landmarks to be seen from the roadside of the famous Slea Head Drive from Dingle.

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Sybil Head in a Storm oil pastels, above.

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Sybil Head from Cruach Mharhain above.

The Force Awakens was partly shot at Skellig Michael, a World Heritage site, off the coast of the Iveragh Peninsula, South Kerry, amid much controversy regarding the damage they may do to the ecology and the antiquities on the island.

The Skellig Rocks are two rather spectacular looking tall craggy rocks rising up from the Wild Atlantic Ocean; there is also a third but smaller rock known as The Lemon. Skellig Michael, or Great Skellig, 714 feet tall, is an ancient monastic site where in the sixth to eighth centuries AD, a community of monks built their monastery – a number of beehive shaped stone dwellings and oratories, and lived their lives there, in considerable hardship and isolation 12 miles from the mainland of Ireland.

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Skellig Rocks, oil on canvas, above.

I have a number of paintings and photos of these famous and spectacular landmarks. Please click the images to see more information about any of them

http://www.worldheritageireland.ie/skellig-michael/

To help you locate these peninsulas: The south west of Ireland has three magnificently beautiful peninsulas. Two of them are in County Kerry – the Dingle Peninsula, and the Iveragh Peninsula (Ring of Kerry), going south, and the most southerly one is in County Cork – the Beara Peninsula (West Cork).

More information can be found on:

http://entertainment.ie/cinema/news/Pic-Disney-Lucasfilm-are-heading-back-to-Kerry-to-film-part-of-Star-Wars-Episode-VIII/377968.htm

Thank you for visiting my blog.

Please also visit my website for more images of the Skelligs and Sybil Head

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WILD FLOWERS AND RAINBOWS (2)

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One very showery evening with sunny spells – perfect for rainbows – at Cuas, Ballydavid, on the Dingle Peninsula. The warm evening light escaping from the dark clouds enhances the brilliance of the montbretias at the roadside.

More rainbow photos on my website http://helene-brennan.com/tag/rainbow 

WILD FLOWERS AND RAINBOWS

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Rainbow and Wild Flowers on the road to Ballyferriter from Dingle.

Hi there! It’s been some time since you last saw me here. I just took a break from blogging and some other online activities due to constraints related to moving house. Very limited electricity and internet service made it just too challenging to continue blogging. The house move still isn’t complete, the internet is still basic and slow, but I have electricity. I hope it won’t take more than a few more months to complete the process.

Of course I have continued to take photos, though my painting is on the back burner. After several months spent in the lovely location of Ballyheigue, I have moved back to the Dingle Peninsula. It’s surely one of the most stunning places in the world. In fact, National Geographic Traveler has described the Dingle Peninsula as “the most beautiful place on earth”. I agree.

Weather is never predictable here, and very often it’s the weather that makes the image. Looking at many of my photos and paintings you will see that light, shadows, clouds, rough seas and rainbows are essential features in the compositions.

This summer has seen some of the coldest and the wettest weather in about 30 years here. However, the old saying that every cloud has a silver lining can perhaps be applied, as frequent showery and sunny spells have also brought the most lovely rainbows.

The above photo shows one of those fleeting rainbows that suddenly appear, the road to Ballyferriter from Dingle, with the iconic Three Sisters in the distance and stunning wild flowers in the field and by the roadside.

Please take time to view Dingle Peninsula photos on my website http://helene-brennan.com/c25-dingle-peninsula-photos

Thank you for looking at my blog.

NEWS FOR MY CUSTOMERS

Charred Forest, Northern Thailand

Charred Forest, Northern Thailand

Recently, my blogs have slowed down somewhat. This is due to other exciting things occupying my time and thinking processes. I am in the process of moving house, but this move has proved more challenging than I expected.

Unfortunately I will only be able to do small prints and no framing at all, for some time – maybe several months. Most of my paintings and equipment will be in storage and I will not be able to use the equipment.

My paintings will still be available for purchase, but no large prints, until my new abode is ready to move into. I will be vacating my current home next week.

In the meantime I hope to post occasional images of my photos or paintings, when I get the time. I hope you like this oil pastel work of a Charred Forest in Thailand. Please see other paintings from my Thailand series on: http://helene-brennan.com/c26-thailand-paintings

BLASKET EVENING

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The warm colors of evening sun on the ruins of Great Blasket Island. The island’s beautiful beach lies behind.

More paintings of the Blasket Islands on my website:

http://helene-brennan.com/c62-blasket-islands-paintings

Blasket Sunset

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What a great privilege it was to sit and observe the beautiful colors of the late evening as the sun sets over the Islands of Great Blasket and Beginish.

More paintings of the Blasket Islands on my website:

www.helene-brennan.com/c62-blasket-islands-paintings

Photos of the islands can be seen at: www.helene-brennan.com/c53-blasket islands-photogtaphs

Pattern and Rhythm

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The famous Cliffs of Moher, in County Clare, on the west coast of Ireland. The forms of the cliffs running into the distance create a rhythmic aspect to the composition, and I have attempted to express the richness of the patterns in each area of the picture.

Have you ever thought about how much your life is affected, governed, controlled by patterns and rhythms. Rhythms are intrinsic to our existence. Our bodies have rhythms; the earth has rhythms; seasons are rhythmic. Rhythms are all around us in our environment.  We seem to have a basic need to organise our life and working spaces into rhythms and patterns. Without this organisation we would have chaos.

Rural farming landscape in the hills of Northern Thailand

The furrows in the field, the trees in the distance and the banana trees in the foreground all offer variety and interest to the rhythms and patterns of this composition. I also use fast flowing strokes to further contribute to the rhythms and movement in the picture.

Small wonder that works of art are often designed with the use of clearly defined areas of rhythms and patterns, which are important aspects to the composition.

Rough Sea with Sleeping Giant

Stormy Sea on Clogher Beach with Inis Tuaisceart (also known as the Sleeping Giant) in the background. The sea provides endless possibilities for the expression of rhythms and patterns.

Patterns in nature are free and random, while still maintaining a sense of organisation. Rhythms and patterns are to be found in many art forms.

Fermoyle Beach, on the north side of the dingle peninsula, West Kerry

The rhythm of the waves on the sea,rolling into the beach, an endless rhythm, random, yet repetitive, maintaining an irresistible visual excitement.

It seems our artistic sensibilities and responses are, in many cases, strongly influenced and encouraged by our need for rhythm and patterns. Often, in visual art, it is impossible to clearly define the difference between rhythms and patterns, but you know – it doesn’t really matter.

Wood Shed in the forest, by the River Wye

The wood pile, the corrugated roof, all framed by the rich foliage provided a wonderful opportunity to express the wonder of nature in its fabulous varieties of patterns

Of course there are many other aspects to a work of art, but for this post I am focusing on pattern and rhythm. I have selected some of my paintings and photos that have examples of pattern in the composition.

Villages and Terraces in the High Atlas Mountains in Morocco

Mountain terraces and village houses offer fascinating sources of patterns in the landscape, in the High Atlas Mountains in Morocco

 

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The retreating tide leaves patterns in the sand, enhanced by the golden light of the setting sun
Sunset at Slea Head, Dingle Peninsula, with the Blasket Islands in view

Without the pattern in these clouds, there would be limited visual interest

In a pond beside Tralee Ship Canal, two swans negotiate a film of ice around the edge.

There is a hint of rhythm created by the two swans, working with the grasses in the foreground. The pattern on the water in the background contrasts with the smooth surface of the ice around the edge.

Evening clouds on Ventry Beach, Dingle Peninsula

Clouds are a wonderful source of nature’s patterns

The setting sun reflects on the fishing boats in Dingle harbor

The visual rhythm created by the row of boats is enhanced by the strong golden evening sunlight, and their colours are unified. The composition gains further interest by the patterns in the clouds, water and stone wall etc.

Nature has taken root in the walls of this old building

Reduced to black and white, we are encouraged to appreciate the details of the patterns in the wall and nature’s growth from the crevices.

The ruin of the schoolhouse used in the movie 'Ryan's Daughter'

In this old skeleton of a ruin of the schoolhouse used in the movie Ryan’s Daughter, over thirty years ago, the sunlight shining through provides interesting rhythms of light and dark.