MIZORAM, CLOSER

I think Mizoram touched my heart a little, so I have decided to return – not physically, but I have revisited my photos and would like to take a closer look at some of them.

Mizoram is a state of North East India, which I visited over the Christmas and New Year period. I have written two earlier posts about this very interesting place.

In this post I have attempted to convey the impressions gained from everyday images, including street posters and notices, which are offering a window into the main values, concerns and issues in the community. These are just the images I happened to see, there are probably many more that I didn’t see or notice. It’s really just a small personal view.

In this post I have cropped some images close, in order to focus on some more specific details. The results may be a little grainy or fuzzy in some cases, but I was never one to let technical imperfection get in the way of saying what I want to say.

IMG_20191231_152106 good manners

IMG_20191231_151958 values

IMG_20191231_152018 values

It’s so nice to see how the core values of respect, kindness and consideration are painted on the walls of the local schools (above).

nutrition poster aizawl

Many street posters are relating to child development, health, nutrition and child safety.

 

IMG_20191231_132939 flower decorations

As it was Christmas time in this state where nearly 90% are Christian, Christmas decorations and lights were much in evidence on the streets. Strange (for me) to see colourful flowers at Christmas time. The snow covered trees and reindeer would be more familiar Christmas images here in Ireland.

Christmas Lights at Chaltlang, Aizawl City.

 

IMG_20191225_142254 aizawl

 

kv-paradise-123909

K V Paradise

KV Paradise, at Durtlang, outside of Aizawl City is a monument and mausoleum created by a local teacher in memory of his beloved wife who was killed in a car accident. A Mizo version of the Taj Mahal, though not so well maintained nowadays. Here the local children are playing in the disused fountain.

I think Mizo children are so delightful and beautiful. You would nearly want to take them home with you. These three below asked me to take their photo as I passed by – and don’t they just know how to pose!!  I hesitate to show children’s photos but they are all so sweet I hope it’s ok to share them.

DSC_0934 children

 

Christmas Feast Queue--

Above is just part of a very, very long queue of people for the Christmas Community Feast in a local Community Hall. Mizos don’t have a big Christmas dinner at home as we do. They all go to Church on Christmas Day, and from what I could hear they sing their hearts out, and the following day they all go to their local community meal, which I can tell you was very good – apart from the pork dish with a lot of big lumps of stewed fat. But there was a big choice of delicious food. The queue was very fast moving and served very efficiently.

Careers, below.

IMG_20191230_153915 poster 2

Some of the street posters related to training and careers.  This one above appealed to me as the woman selling inflatable toys was standing in front of a poster offering air hostess training. “Let your dream come true”… I also noticed that only females are wanted in this one. On all my recent flights both men and women were employed as cabin crew. The job title “Air Hostess” seems to be very old fashioned now.

Below are more street posters or wall paintings relating to training or occupations

Homes

dsc_1084

Homes, a subject close to my heart, come in many shapes and sizes, and different building styles. In Aizawl city there are of course blocks of flats as well as single and adjoined houses. But to hugely simplify it there are 3 different types of houses that I observed. 1. Traditional Mizo bamboo houses, mostly outside the city centre and in the mountains, pretty but not very weather proof (I have no photos).  2. Timber framed cottage style houses with walls of some type of thin porous board (possibly MDF or similar?) and corrugated roofs.  3. Concrete and steel supported single brick boxy shaped multi floor buildings, also with corrugated roofs or flat concrete balcony roofs (often both). Now many would also like to remind me that you would often see houses with a combination of all styles of building. But in general I would say that the structures are basic and not of good quality particularly in terms of insulation and waterproofing.

The following photos show several different examples.

My impression was that the concrete and brick structures appear to grow upwards, floor upon floor, as and when more space is necessary for the family, or to create rentable income. So, while the road space outside cannot be expanded, the number of people living in the area grows and grows, putting more and more pressure on the overcrowded streets which are very polluted with the traffic fumes, smelly, noisy and most unhealthy. There is a massive need to create sustainable business opportunities outside of the city to encourage more people to move out of this crowded place.

Burial

DSC_1085 aizawl graves

The graves in Aizawl are worth a close look because of their colourful and decorated appearance. They are also closely integrated with the residential areas.

By contrast with the modern well tended graves in Aizawl, I have included a couple of photos of older graves in the mountains in Sialsuk, some miles from Aizawl, where a village has now disappeared.

My earlier posts on Mizoram can be seen here:

https://helenebrennan.wordpress.com/2020/02/04/mizoram-india-up-in-the-mountains/

https://helenebrennan.wordpress.com/2020/01/27/mizoram-2/

I still have more photos I would like to show, but maybe later. Thanks for visiting. Do come back again. More Mizoram photos can be seen on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c51-india

I can be contacted via my website.