VIEWS FROM CRUACH MHARHAIN (2)

Following from my earlier post Walking up Cruach Mharhain, these photos show arrival at the top of this rather steep little mountain, on the Dingle Peninsula, in the South West of Ireland.

The views from the top of Cruach Mharhain are so amazingly beautiful; it’s such a rewarding walk. It’s one of my favourites, but often the ground is too soggy, especially in the winter. Recently we had such a lot of dry weather that the ground was very dry and firm, perfect for walking.

Sybil Head (Ceann Sibéal), above.

Inis Tuaisceart (Sleeping Giant), one of the Blasket Island group, above.

The Three Sisters, top left, and Ballydavid Head, to the right of them.

A zoomed in look at Clogher Beach, above.

Mount Brandon, taken on the way down again.

The Blasket Islands, above and below.

There are lambs galore in the fields, and who could resist taking a photo or two.

So that’s the end of that walk. It’s a perfect little workout for the heart and lungs, and at the same time offering such wonderful visual and mental nourishment. I hope you enjoyed the views too. Thanks for looking.

Many photos of the Dingle Peninsula are available from my website.

WALKING UP CRUACH MHARHAIN

A selection of photos from a walk up Cruach Mharhain. The photo below (from a previous post) shows how this modestly sized mountain appears from my home, on the Dingle Peninsula.

DSC_1341 Emlagh Dingle Sunset

This is a short sharp ascent from where I park my car, but it doesn’t take long to get to the top – unless of course, like me, you keep stopping to take photos.

The weather was perfect, with glorious sunshine and cloud shadows giving definition and form to the landscape. I think the views from this mountain are hard to beat, it’s such a rewarding walk.

You can even see the mountains of the Iveragh Peninsula across the bay above.

There are amazing views of the Blasket Islands from this mountain.

Getting higher, nearly there! There are so many photos to show I have decided to show the others in another post. The best views are at the top. Please come back to see the next post. Thanks for visiting.

ROAD WALK VIEWS, EMLAGH TO VENTRY

This was a walk from the Emlagh area, Ballyferriter, to Ventry, via Leataoibh, on the Dingle Peninsula, It was a reasonably pleasant day with sunny spells and cloudy patches, which I think often make the landscape more interesting and photogenic.

Cruach Mharhain is the peaky mountain in these photos.  I have previously posted photos taken from a walk up this mountain, but I must have deleted that post. I had to delete several earlier posts to create more media space. I have to walk up there again some day soon, but it requires some preceeding days of dry weather, and that’s not easy to get here at this time of the year.

When walking alone I get better photos. When I walk with other people I am distracted with conversation and also I always think I am very boring as a walking companion, as I keep stopping to snap the views.  So, on this occasion I did not take many shots, and instead I have included the following six photos from the same route, on earlier dates.

 

Just a farm shed on the roadside. I would think it was probably once someone’s home, a long time ago.

 

The Three Sisters, above, a familiar sight that can be seen from many places in this area.

A quiet country road, looking back, with Mount Brandon in view.

I really liked the character of this rusty old tractor. As you can see I gave it some aging treatment.

Mount Eagle in this one above. Another one I must climb again soon – also waiting for dryer weather for this one. I often do a short walk up for some heart & lung exercise.

I liked the mossy clumps that nestled on this ailing holly bush in someone’s garden.

 

 

A view over Ventry and Dingle Bay, with the Iveragh Peninsula (South Kerry) across the bay.

 

Arriving in the Ventry area, here is Rathanane Castle, (also Rahinanne, spellings vary here) a tower house that was built by the once very powerful Fitzgerald family, way back in the 15th century. It was built on top of the remains of an ancient ringfort and souterrain.  This castle, like so many others across Ireland, was destroyed by Oliver Cromwell’s forces around 1650, when he led a band of troops through Ireland, on a very bloody campaign. (Cromwell was a British political and military leader). I read only recently that he died from complications of malaria, contracted from a mosquito bite he sustained while in Ireland.  Wonder if it was a Kerry mosquito!  I was surprised to learn that there was malaria here then.

It is posssible to walk in around the castle on payment of about a euro to the land owner. I have been in there a few years back. Two photos below are from that occasion.

It was a rather dull cloudy day, giving a menacing feel to the atmosphere.

Shortly after that we arrived at Ventry village to pick up the car we had parked there earlier, being a linear walk.

This link will take you to more photos of the Emlagh, Ballyferriter area:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/emlagh

Thank you for your visit. I hope you have enjoyed my photos.