BALLYDAVID WALK

DSC_3154 ballydavid

This was a walk along the coast and cliffs from the small village of Ballydavid, just a few km down the coast from my home. Thrift (sea pinks) were in bloom and looking glorious.

 

DSC_3216 ballydavid thrifts pinks

 

 

 

DSC_3165 ballydavid

Above, looking across to Mount Eagle; the small beach opposite is Wine Strand, which has appeared in many of my posts, from a closer viewpoint across the way.

 

DSC_3160 ballydavid

The small lookout post above was one of 83 that were built during World War 2 around the coast of Ireland and were manned by the Local Defence Force.

 

DSC_3155 ballydavid

Cruach Mharhain and  Mount Eagle (right and left) opposite, viewed across from Ballydavid.

 

DSC_3153 ballydavid

The Three Sisters above and below, also to be seen in many of my photos.

 

DSC_3147 Ballydavid

 

 

DSC_3171 ballydavid

The headland in the distance above is Ballydavid Head.

Below, another view of the WW2 lookout post.

DSC_3168 ballydavid

 

More images of the Ballydavid area can be seen on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/ballydavid

As always, I appreciate your visit. Do take care.

CULROSS, SCOTLAND

DSC_8883 Culross

Culross is a really charming village in Fife, Scotland. A former royal burgh and parish, the village has a population of around 400.  Culross was once  a bustling industrial centre of the coal mining and salt panning industries during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, and many of its buildings are from this era. Originally it is believed that a religious community was founded here by Saint Serf during the 6th century.

DSC_8885 Culross-

The building above is surely one of the most picturesque in the village.

DSC_8889 Culross

The National Trust for Scotland is involved in the conservation of this historic place and owns several of the buildings.

DSC_8890 Culross

Stepped gables and outdoor stairs to the top floor are very typical of houses in this area. I was told the reason for the stairs was that animals were kept on the ground floor but I can’t quite believe that, looking at the style of the ground floor windows. Perhaps they were two separate houses.

DSC_8895 Culross

Above, the incongruous appearance of a petro-chemical works can be seen from the village.

DSC_8894 Culross

 

DSC_8896 Culross

 

DSC_8892 Culross

 

DSC_8888 Culross

 

DSC_8914 Culross

 

DSC_8916 doorstep flowers Culross

Of course every sweet well kept village has its share of doorstep flowers.

DSC_8922 Culross

 

DSC_8923 Culross

 

DSC_8926 Culross

 

DSC_8928 Culross

I was slightly surprised at the red roof tiles but then I read that it is thought that the collier ships carried them on return from Holland as ballast, and that’s how they were introduced to the area.

DSC_8929 Culross

This building above and below is known as Culross Palace – not actually a royal palace, it was built by a very successful merchant, Sir George Bruce, the Laird of Carnock, between 1597 and 1611.  James VI is believed to have visited in 1617.  It is open to the public and there is a cafe there, which I didn’t manage to have time to try.

DSC_8876 culross palace

 

DSC_8932 stone steps Culross

 

DSC_8934 Culross

 

DSC_8935 brexit 2

Getting a bit out of date now, the above two notices were displayed on either side of someone’s front door, giving a flavour of local sentiment.

DSC_8911

Culross Abbey was founded in 1217. The monastery is now a ruin but the remaining part of the building is used by the Church of Scotland as a local Parish Church.

DSC_8913

 

DSC_8904 culross monastery

 

DSC_8905

 

DSC_8908 Culross Monastery

 

DSC_8901 Culross Abbey

This village has been a film location for several films, not surprisingly, the most recent being the popular TV series Outlander.

There are other notable buildings but I have lost several photos.

The name Culross is generally pronounced Cooriss locally.

These photos are from June 2019.  I have more Scotland photos to come. Do come back again. Thanks for visiting.

I can be contacted via my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c867-photos-of-scotland

 

 

 

FALKLAND VILLAGE, SCOTLAND

DSC_8740 falkland palace

The village of Falkland in Fife, Scotland is a really pretty, well presented conservation village. The village houses are mostly built of cut stone, with  attractive but simple geometric styling.  The village also is home to the impressive Falkland Palace. This area was a location of the TV series ‘Outlander’.

DSC_8720 falkland

 

DSC_8741

 

 

DSC_8729 music shop falkland

Shop window in Falkland village, above.

DSC_8731 falkand houses

 

DSC_8732

 

DSC_8733

 

DSC_8735-2

 

DSC_8739

Falkland Palace, a royal palace of Scottish Kings, a favourite place to visit of Mary Queen of Scots, originated in the 12th/13th centuries, and underwent various transformations in the centuries that followed. It was used in the filming of the TV series ‘Outlander’ and is a popular place for visitors now, being open to the public and maintained by the National Trust for Scotland.

DSC_8744 falkland palace

 

DSC_8728 Falkland Scotland

 

DSC_8748 falkland

 

DSC_8749-2

I love the stepped effect on the gable walls that can be seen on many houses in this area.

DSC_8752 falkland

 

DSC_8754

 

DSC_8757

 

DSC_8766-3

 

DSC_8775

This is the gate house at the Falkland Estate. Just look at those chimneys!

DSC_8776

The Falkland Estate is now a place of learning and recreation and there is a network of walks and cycle paths around the estate. Mine was a short visit, so I just have photos of the places I happened to see.

Below are some black and white photos I took while on a forest trail on the estate.

DSC_8705 forest bw 2

 

DSC_8699 forest

 

DSC_8707 forest bw 2

 

DSC_8699 forest bw

 

DSC_8708 forest bw

This was last June, 2019. You might expect a good number of tourists around, but it was fairly quiet. A great place to visit if you don’t like crowds, and you can generally expect less rain and more sunshine here than in the more popular west of the country.  I mean, one day I really hope to see Skye – I’ve been there three times and each time it was shrouded in heavy mist and rain!

More from this region will follow. But there are more photos on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c867-photos-of-scotland

STAY WELL!

CHARLESTOWN, ITS LIMEKILNS etc.

DSC_8839 lime kilns

I visited Scotland last summer, where I visited friends in Charlestown, Fife,  but haven’t got round to showing these photos until now. Staying at home more due to the corona virus restrictions has finally motivated me to try to get it done.

Charlestown was a planned village created by Charles Bruce, the 5th Earl of Elgin in the 1750s.  The village cottages were built to house the workers operating the limekilns, intending to make the estate a major producer of lime for building purposes and fertiliser. Coal and limestone were resources already available on the estate. The lime industry was previously located in the neighbouring village called Limekilns.

Charlestown soon became one of the most important industrial centres in Scotland, served by a railway and harbour. It’s located on the coast of the Forth estuary, which flows into the North Sea on the East of Scotland.

But from the 1930s lime production diminished and the limekilns at Charlestown finally closed in 1956.  They quickly became derelict and neglected but work on their restoration began in about 1990 and today they represent an amazing bit of history and industrial architecture.

Here are my photos of those wonderful architectural old lime kilns at Charlestown.

DSC_8845 lime kilns

 

DSC_8853

 

DSC_8854

 

DSC_8862 lime kilns

 

DSC_8855 lime kilns detail

 

DSC_8850

 

DSC_8860 lime kilns

 

DSC_8857

 

DSC_8861 lime kiln

 

DSC_8847

 

DSC_8840 lime kilns

 

DSC_8821 Charlestown Harbour

The harbour, now a rather sleepy place compared with it’s once hustle and bustle.

DSC_8823 Charlestown Harbour

 

DSC_8824 charlestown harbour

An old type of houseboat, moored at the harbour.

DSC_8825 Charlestown Harbour

 

DSC_8830 houseboat Charlestown

 

DSC_8832 Houseboat Charleston

 

DSC_8834 boatwreck and Limekilns

 

DSC_8786 cottage gardens

The old worker’s cottages on the Elgin estate, now desirable residences. The tiny stone cottages, with their spacious gardens, all appear to have extensions built now.  Most of them have fabulous gardens, some in the front and back.  I was so impressed with my friend’s garden, above. You couldn’t do that in many parts of West Kerry.

DSC_8792 garden butterfly

 

DSC_8788 cottages in charlestown

 

DSC_8800

The above rooftops and chimneys are of houses on the coast road, Charleston.

DSC_8804 Forth Bridge

A view of the Queensferry Bridge, with the evening sun illuminating the cables, one of three bridges over the Firth of Forth. Another bridge can be glimpsed in the background. I will show more of these bridges in another post.

DSC_8872 poppy field

 

DSC_8868 poppy field

The area is amazingly colourful with flowers – wild and cultivated, everywhere. Above is a field of wild poppies, close to the village. I was amazed to see how much more flowerful the area is compared with back in West Kerry, and the foliage growth on the trees much more advanced, in spite of the more northerly latitude, and also on the cold North Sea. The windy Atlantic coast at home does seem to shorten our summer. They also get more sunshine in this part of Scotland than in West Kerry.

I have more Scotland to show. I hope to do so soon, now that more severe Corona Virus restrictions are keeping me at home.

There are more photos of Scotland on my website, I’m still in the process of adding to that:

http://www.helene-brennan.com/c867-photos-of-scotland

It’s possible to contact me from the website.

Thanks for visiting my post. BE SAFE!

AGIOS SPYRIDON

rrem

This was a boat to fall in love with. I did so in December 2018, when I stumbled upon it in Latsi (Latchi), Cyprus. It was such a beautiful old wooden fishing boat, dry docked, and totally neglected. It seemed so wrong that such a lovely piece of craftsmanship  would now be so uncared for, although you can be sure that thousands of tourists have passed by and like myself have taken many, many photos.

Last year I posted some of these photos here after my trip to Cyprus. I didn’t know anything at all about this boat at the time and didn’t manage to find any information. I didn’t even know that it was named Agios Spyridon

My earlier post can be seen here: https://helenebrennan.wordpress.com/2019/01/15/time-and-tide-and-flaking-paint/

On my most recent trip to Cyprus in December 2019, I went to take a look to see how this old lady was getting on. Alas, I found it in the process of being demolished. There were some local photographers there to record it  and I got the impression that it was a bit of an event.

DSC_0514 agios spyridos

 

DSC_0521 agios spyridos

 

DSC_0516 agios spyridos

 

DSC_0509 agios spyridos

 

DSC_0507

Since my return home I did some more research and was delighted to find some information about it. It seems she was built in 1950 on Crete and  was one of a type  of fishing vessels known as karavoskaro.

On dry land since 2004, the boat was supposed to have been restored but unfortunately that didn’t happen and total negligence forced a decision to have her demolished. Considered to be worthy of being listed as a monument of nautical heritage, it has been digitally recorded in a joint project between the University of Cyprus and the Cyprus Institute.

The 3d image, which you can pull around with your mouse and view from all sides  can be seen here:

http://ephemera.cyi.ac.cy/sites/ephemera/3D1/Latsi_Ag_Spyridon.html

I am familiar with 3d photography as I too was involved with a project to digitally record ancient monuments in my area.  http://www.corcadhuibhne3d.ie/sites.php  A number of these sites were recorded by myself. This development in imaging is a brilliant tool we now have to record any objects that would otherwise disappear from us forever. We may have had photos, but to view objects in 3d is so amazing.

If you click on any image here you will get a better quality view.

Thank you for visiting my post.

MORNING BOAT TRIP FROM DINGLE

The following photos were taken on a recent trip to the Blasket  Islands. Here, I am showing the shots taken when leaving Dingle Harbour before reaching the islands. Island photos to follow later.

DSC_8377

 

DSC_8378 dingle harbour

The wash from the boat made interesting patterns in the morning light. The town of Dingle sits on the shoreline.

DSC_8379 dingle harbour

 

DSC_8380 Dingle Harbour

 

DSC_8386 dingle harbour

 

DSC_8388 hussey's folly

The above small tower is known as Hussey’s Folly. Built in the late 1840s during the years of the famine, for the purpose of providing famine relief employment.

DSC_8394 dingle rocks

 

DSC_8395 dingle lighthouse with wash

Dingle lighthouse, above and below.

DSC_8398 dingle lighthouse with wash

 

DSC_8401 dingle rocks

The cliffs around this coast have beautiful and colourful rock formations.

DSC_8402 dingle rocks

 

DSC_8416 dingle rocks and eask tower

The tower above is Eask Tower, pointing the way into Dingle Harbour, the building of which also provided famine relief employment in the 1840s .

DSC_8429 mount eagle from boat

 

DSC_8455 dunmore head

Dunmore Head above.

Thanks for looking.  It would be really nice if you could take a look at my website for more photos of the Dingle Peninsula:

http://www.helene-brennan.com/c25–photos-of-dingle-peninsula

And if you like paintings, here are my paintings of the Dingle Peninsula:

http://www.helene-brennan.com/c15-paintings-of-the-dingle-peninsula

PAPHOS ARCHAEOLOGICAL PARK

DSC_2088

Cyprus is an archaeologist’s paradise. Layer upon layer of historical architectural ruins lie all over the place, and especially here in the Archaeological Park in Paphos. History has not always been kind to earlier civilisations, with foreign invasions and earthquakes destroying many wonderful buildings and works of art.

Some of the ruins here are as old as 2000 years or more, and some date to medieval times.

Here are several photos of these ruins, which include four roman palaces (with some well preserved mosaic floors), castles and amphitheatres.

DSC_6702-

DSC_6703-

DSC_6705

DSC_6707

DSC_6712

DSC_6716

DSC_6717

DSC_6720

DSC_6729

DSC_6754

DSC_6756

DSC_2078

DSC_2080

DSC_6700

DSC_6704-

Thanks for viewing my photos. Please visit my Cyprus Category on my website:

http://www.helene-brennan.com/c857-cyprus

Also see my other posts on Cyprus here

CYPRUS, IN THE TROODOS MOUNTAINS

WINTER IN PAPHOS, CYPRUS

TIME AND TIDE – and Flaking Paint (old boat at Latchi)

THE MAGIC OF LIGHT (Zygi Harbour, Cyprus)

STAVROVOUNI (Cyprus)

STAVROVOUNI 2 (CYPRUS)

APPROACHING CYPRUS

TOMBS OF THE KINGS, PAPHOS, CYPRUS

CROAGH PATRICK – For St. Patrick’s Day

croagh patrick2 copy

This is my pastel picture of Croagh Patrick, locally known as The Reek. This was a December view, as the sun set early, and cast a red light over the mountain.

It’s an important landmark that dominates the landscape around the Westport area in County Mayo, in the Republic of Ireland.

According to legend, St. Patrick fasted for 40 days on the summit of this mountain, where there is now a chapel built. Every year, about a million people climb this mountain, and 25,000 of them climb on Reek Sunday, (last Sunday in July) many barefoot, performing various rituals.

I climbed it once, not for religious reasons, but it’s a challenging walk, and really worth the effort, as the view from the top over Clew Bay is amazing.

TOMBS OF THE KINGS, PAPHOS, CYPRUS

The Tombs of the Kings in Paphos, Cyprus, is a very famous UNESCO Work Heritage site.  A must see for all visitors to the region. It dates back to about the 3rd century BC and it was a  burial ground for the richest, most powerful Ptolemaics of the time. Apparently, no Kings were buried there, but it was given its name because of the impressiveness of the rock hewn tombs.

Excavations began there in 1977; tomb raiders had long since removed most of the artifacts. A few pieces remained, that were inaccessible to the raiders.

arch 2 DSC_1497

 

DSC_1434

Individual niches or loculi are cut into the rock in many of the chambers

DSC_1427

 

tombs of kings arch DSC_1494

 

inside tomb 1436

Some of the rock cut stairs have survived well, but many are not easy for old knees nowadays.

tombs of kings paphos

This is a well preserved tomb with lovely doric columns.

DSC_1422

 

DSC_1401

 

DSC_1398

Above can be seen hole in the wall made by tomb raiders to gain access to an adjoining tomb.

DSC_1399

 

DSC_1521

 

DSC_1485

 

DSC_1442

 

DSC_1511

 

DSC_1444

 

 

tombs of kings

 

DSC_1407

Tourists building stone piles in the area. The whole place is littered with them – stone piles, that is!

DSC_1529

 

DSC_1461-

 

DSC_1464

 

DSC_1465

 

tombs of kings - stone piles1462-

Thanks for visiting.

My earlier posts on Cyprus are:

CYPRUS, IN THE TROODOS MOUNTAINS

TIME AND TIDE – and Flaking Paint (old boat at Latchi)

WINTER IN PAPHOS, CYPRUS

APPROACHING CYPRUS

THE MAGIC OF LIGHT  (Zygi Harbour, Cyprus)

 STAVROVOUNI (Cyprus)

STAVROVOUNI 2  (CYPRUS)

Do checkout my website category on Cyprus:

http://www.helene-brennan.com/c857-cyprus

 

 

 

 

CYPRUS – Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa

Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa, in Paphos

Cyprus is an archaeologist’s paradise. There are several ancient sites, all over the country and several of them are in Paphos where I stayed, and excavations are ongoing.

Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa in Kato Paphos is a very interesting site where over the centuries from the 4th century until the 16th century, a number of buildings of Christian worship were created and destroyed.  The exact history seems very complicated, and involved Arab invasion and Earthquakes, building, destruction and rebuilding many times.

The existing church is used for worship in recent times. I didn’t think it was open while I was there, but I understand that it is beautiful inside. Worth a look judging by the photos I have seen.

Here are several photos of the current building and the ancient ruins that surround it.

Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa

Below is a photo of an information notice at the site. If you click on it you will get a sharper, more readable version.

Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa church description-

 

Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa DSC_1669

 

Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa DSC_1668

 

Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa DSC_1666

The ancient sites of Cyprus are particularly noted for their splendid mosaics, some of which you can see below.

mosaic at Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa DSC_1656

There are raised walkways around the site, offering great views of the mosaics and other remains, without damage to the antiquities.

mosaics an column remains at Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa DSC_1655

 

Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa DSC_1653

 

mosaic floor at Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa DSC_1658

 

Mosaic floor at Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa DSC_1665-2

 

mosaic floor at Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa DSC_1675

 

ancient column remains at Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa DSC_1678

 

decorative column remains with leaf design Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa DSC_1677

 

Agia Kyriaki Chrysopolitissa DSC_1670-3

 

WP_20171231_12_13_57_ st pauls pillar with arrow

St Paul and St Barnabas are believed to have visited this place to spread Christianity in 45 AD, and it is believed that St Paul was tied to a pillar by the Roman soldiers and whipped  39 times, before the Roman Governor Sergius Paulus was converted to Christianity. The photo above shows the pillar marked with a red arrow.

Thanks so much for viewing my post. If you would like to see more of Cyprus, I have made a number of other posts on Cyprus. See the links below, and watch out for more to come.

CYPRUS, IN THE TROODOS MOUNTAINS

WINTER IN PAPHOS, CYPRUS

TIME AND TIDE – and Flaking Paint (old boat at Latchi)

THE MAGIC OF LIGHT  (Zygi Harbour, Cyprus)

 STAVROVOUNI  (Cyprus)

STAVROVOUNI 2  (CYPRUS)

APPROACHING CYPRUS

Also, do checkout my website category on Cyprus:

http://www.helene-brennan.com/c857-cyprus