KEEPING LOCAL

corona times

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The number of deaths and transmission rates of the virus are dropping now. Restrictions are easing. I am walking in the local area now; it’s great to be able to walk to the coast, walk on the cliffs and visit several beaches, all within the permitted range.

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This walk to three beaches takes me along the main road, for part of the way, where there is a wonderful range of wild flowers, most of them the same as in my garden, which I have already captured, but every picture is different, even if the subject is the same.

Above are two shots of the wild yellow iris, a lovely flower when seen on the roadside  or unused land, but an absolute menace in my garden where it grows enormous green spears and has massive roots like big tree branches spreading underground. They had colonised this garden for several years and have become too well established.

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Speedwell, above, and herb robert, below.  One of the things I really like about herb robert is the lovely red foliage that it sometimes has.

 

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I just like the tangle of leaves and light in this one above.

 

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I still haven’t identified this lovely small white flower.

 

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Red clover above

 

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My first beach, Murioch beach, above and three pics below.

 

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I often pass this garden with these unusual long eared sheep. They can be difficult to capture as they almost invariably turn away as soon as I point the camera.

 

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Goats in a garden.

 

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Second beach, above and three below, is Wine Strand, a delightful very small beach.  A young family is enjoying the warm sunny day.

 

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I normally prefer to catch a little more drama in my photos. This has been an exceptionally prolonged spell of beautiful sunny and mostly calm weather.  Shouldn’t complain!

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The beaches below are Cúl Dorcha, at Ballinrannig, which leads onto Béal Bán Beach

 

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Pardon me for mentioning it again, but the rocky hill seen here is Sybil Head (Ceann Sibéal) where Lucas Films had their Star Wars set for the shooting of The Last Jedi for several months during 2016.  The presence of the Star Wars film crew and actors in the area was a big boost to tourism – not that it was needed, but I suppose many did benefit from it.

Just to step back in time, here is a photo of Sybil Head from my home showing the temporary steel road that was laid at the time, and some blue containers can also be seen. This was taken in March 2016. I think more of the set arrived later.

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The children at the local primary school here in Ballyferriter, will not forget the visit they had from Peter Mayhew, who visited them at the school in full Chewbacca attire. They told me he had to bend down to get through the door.  It was so nice of him to visit the children.  It’s sad that he has since passed away.

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I digress – back to my walk, still at Cúl Dorcha Beach.

 

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DSC_3325 ballinrannig ogham stone Above, at a grassy promontory at Ballinrannig, between Wine Strand and  Cúl Dorcha Beach is this Ogham Stone (pronounced ome, like home without the h). Ogham is an ancient Irish alphabet, dating back to the 4th century AD.  It’s the earliest form of writing in Ireland. The marks on the side of this stone are the ogham script. There are several of these stones to be seen in the country, and a large percentage of them are on the Dingle Peninsula.  At the end of the 18th century a big storm uncovered seven of these stones here and most of them were moved to other locations by Lord Ventry. This one above is the only one left at its original location.

A project to record these ogham stones and other carved stones in 3d can be seen on this website:  http://corcadhuibhne3d.ie/home.php  Several people in the community including myself have been involved in this project.

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I like to record some of the old farm sheds in the area, here are a couple of examples I passed on this walk. The one above, like many, looks like it was originally built as a home.  Many of these old stone cottages are now used for storage or for animals.

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Peacock butterfly, above.  Looks like some of his colours have faded.

 

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No idea of the name of these pink flowers, but we all know buttercups, below.

 

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So that’s the end of my walk. I appreciate your visit. Stay safe!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MORE THAN A WEEK

corona times

It’s more than a week now into partial shutdown and social isolation. it’s good to live in a place where one can still walk and enjoy the fresh air and lovely views.

These photos are on Béal Bán (White Mouth), Ballyferriter, on the Dingle Peninsula, County Kerry.

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Just thought I’m mention again that the above rocky ridge, Sybil Head (Ceann Sibéal), was a film location of Star Wars – The Last Jedi, during 2016.

Covid-19 doesn’t stop the rainbows. I unfortunately missed the best brilliance of this rainbow while on the long winding road from the main road to the beach, but here are some captures of it, sorry if they look a little like some previously posted shots – same place but different rainbow.

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I noticed a runner stop to look at a bird near the water’s edge on the beach. I stopped to enquire was there something wrong with the bird and he informed me that it was a fulmar, which normally spends all its life at sea and has very limited walking skills. I guess it needs to propel itself in water in order to fly up. I hope it survived the several dogs that were running free on the beach. They know nothing about social distancing!

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As I went on my way I realised that I may have slightly transgressed the recommended social distance in that conversation. So difficult to remember all the time, in this place where people are normally very sociable!

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St. Patrick’s Day on Tuesday demonstrated the real spirit of the people in the country, who created their own mini parades, in their back gardens with their children, and with musicians in some cases, and recorded them of course!

This week brought some very amusing corona virus inspired videos to my phone, including one of a couple of guys planting toilet rolls! That did make me laugh out loud.

It was no surprise that there were no toilet rolls at the supermarket, but I got everything I needed. Only one person allowed in the pharmacy at one time.

No swimming, no pub music sessions (I play flute), no weekly gathering of musicians at my house.

My own gallery is closed to visitors, but trading online or by phone is still an option.

This is just a microcosm of Corona virus imposed changes in my tiny insignificant world.  But the real concern is the health of individuals affected by the virus, and then for the economy and the loss of jobs and stress and strain on people’s lives, all over the world. 

But nature continues to provide us with its wonderful gifts. Here are two photos of this week’s sunsets, which I have also covered in my previous two posts.

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The birds are still singing in the garden. They are still fluttering around the bird feeder. I found some small but tasty broccoli florets that had been developing quietly and gave me a nice surprise. I had written off the broccoli plants! The wind has been so fierce and persistent this past few months.

Good health to you all and your dearest.

 


HIGH TIDE AT BÉAL BÁN

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I knew there was an extra high tide in as I went to the beach, so there was no possibility of a beach walk, but I hoped for something interesting to capture as the waves would be crashing in to the coast. This was Béal Bán (White Mouth) Ballyferriter, near Dingle, in the South West of Ireland.

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The ship beyond is an Irish Navy vessel. They patrol the coast to watch out for illegal foreign fishing boats.

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Photos of the Dingle Peninsula on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c25–photos-of-dingle-peninsula

I can be contacted via my website. I welcome any enquiries

Thank you for viewing my post. I hope you have enjoyed my photos.

SUNSHINE, SEASIDE AND SERENITY

An afternoon walk on Ventry Beach, Dingle Peninsula, Ireland.

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Ventry Beach

 

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I hope you have enjoyed my photos. Please check out this tag on my website for more images of Ventry Beach:

http://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/ventry+beach

 

Also, click here for earlier posts on Ventry:

And more:

https://wordpress.com/post/helenebrennan.wordpress.com/163884

 

WEST KERRY SUNSETS (2)

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Blasket Islands

 

 

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Emlagh, Ballyferriter

 

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Emlagh, Ballyferriter

 

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Mid-summer sunset at Ceann Seatha

 

 

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Ventry Beach

 

 

Lots more photos from the Dingle Peninsula, West Kerry, on my website:

http://www.helene-brennan.com/c25-dingle-peninsula-photos

TIME CHANGES EVERYTHING – AT COURTOWN

 

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It’s not often that I get across to the east coast of this country nowadays, but I recently made a short visit to Courtown, in County Wexford. The weather wasn’t great, the sunshine was scarce and the light was dull, but I grabbed a few opportunities to capture some images

It must be said that Courtown once had the most perfect beach in the world – with a marvellous expanse of dry, soft, clean, golden sand. The water depth was perfect and safe for swimming. Admittedly, it didn’t have the fabulous scenery of the Kerry beaches, with which I am now very familiar, but the quality of the beach itself was second to none. Sunshine was always more plentiful in that part of the country too. I have no photos of what it was like before – but OMG – look what is is now!

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What happened to all the lovely sand?

It’s an understatement to say that erosion has taken its toll. Tons of boulders have been deposited to ‘protect’ the coastline. Time has shown once again that nothing stays the same.

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Bathing still continues between the piles of boulders

It’s good to see that there are still some gaps in the mountains of boulders, where families can enjoy the sun, sand and sea.

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Weather shows its visual charms

 

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A glimpse of normality

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Off shore activities are definitely more popular now

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Less beach – more sea. You win some, you lose some!

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Swimmers still enjoy the beach

 

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The wood by the beach

The opening of woodland trails do compensate in part for the loss of so much beach

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The beach, viewed from the wood

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The woodland trail is really lovely

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View of the woodland from the beach

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Storm torn trees. Winter storms have wreaked havoc on them also

But alas, the woodland was not safe either from the ferocious storms of last winter.

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Graffiti on a storm felled tree

Graffiti on this storm felled tree on the beach echoes my thoughts about transience and change, although I could not read the full sentence that once was there.

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Great for the stove – if I could carry  it home!

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I quite liked these natural sculptures that have landed on the beach

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More of nature’s offerings

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Many pieces already chopped – presumably for the home fires

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The last rays of sun creep up along the RNLI boathouse

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Evening walk as the sun goes down

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Something for all ages in Courtown

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Even the dodgems look different

Please check out my other photos of County Wexford on my website:

http://helene-brennan.com/c97-photos-of–county-wexford-

RURAL LIVING – JOYS AND COMPROMISES

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Yes there are so many benefits that I enjoy and appreciate about living on the wonderful Dingle Peninsula.  I love the helpful friendly people, country roads, amazing beaches, glorious sunsets, magnificent walks, clean air, space, big garden, little shops and big ones……………..

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My only complaint is my lack of decent Broadband. It would be nice to be able to view more blogs and like them etc., but some days it’s just too slow to view others’ blogs, especially those with image content.

But thankfully, today I have managed do do this post and upload a few photos, I hope you will enjoy them.

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Please visit my website: http://www.helene-brennan.com

MOUNT BRANDON

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A winter evening view of Mount Brandon from Cúl Dorcha Beach, Ballyferriter, West Kerry.

Please visit my website for more Cúl Dorcha: http://helene-brennan.com/tag/cúl+dorcha

EVENING WALK ON BALLYHEIGUE BEACH

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You may notice that just I love the West of Ireland Sunsets. This is Ballyheigue Beach, my current regular walking spot, on which I have taken hundreds of photos, but each one is different. That is the wonderful thing about this climate; it offers something new every day.

I am still struggling with a frustratingly slow Internet connection speed, so my posts are now infrequent, but I expect things will improve in a few months time.

Thanks a million to you bloggers who have liked my posts and apologies that I have not been able to access many blogs to view and like them. It’s taken at least half an hour to get this far with creating this post. In order to avoid wasting so much time I go and wash up, make a cup of tea or play my flute while waiting for pages to load!

More photos from Ballyheigue on my website http://helene-brennan.com/c110-north-kerry

I would like to take this opportunity to wish a VERY HAPPY NEW YEAR to all bloggers and all others who view this. Thanks you for taking the time to view my post. May all good things flow to you this coming year – and always!

BALLYHEIGUE

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Hello again fellow bloggers. Sorry I have been missing for a while. Very busy with moving house and a few other things.

Well, I have NOT drawn the short straw with my current temporary accommodation, where I am enjoying the lovely resort of Ballyheigue by the sea, with it’s georgeous beach on the Atlantic coastline.

I am very lucky to be living here, though there is one drawback – my Internet connection is slow to standing still, making  it more difficult and time-consuming to make contributions to WordPress. Often, I have been unable to access the site at all.

In the meantime I have been finding Twitter more accessible and I would love you to follow me on that.

The above photo is one of many I have taken on Ballyheigue Beach. A West of Ireland sunset is always a delight.

More photos of North Kerry can be seen on: https://www.helene-brennan.com/c110-north-kerry