TRIP TO THE LOCAL

A trip to the local would normally mean to the local pub here, but with all the pubs still closed, now it’s a trip to the local beach! Much more healthy of course. This is another look at Béal Bán (White Mouth) Beach in Ballyferriter, on the Dingle Peninsula. My followers may remember several views from here in the past. I don’t like to go for a walk without my camera, so hopefully these photos are sufficiently different from previous versions.

I have a new camera for these past couple of months and I’ve recently realised that the date in the camera is in 2028! I thought I had re-set it but apparently not. Only discovered that after serious delving into why Google refused to publish a photo. They were unable to tell me why, but eventually I worked it out for myself. There are just too many photos taken now to change all the dates in, so hopefully these images don’t cause too much of a problem.

I never tire of watching the waves and capturing them.

Carraig Dubh (Black Rock) is the name of this rock – I’m told. I have been given other information, but I’ll go with the first.

It was quite a dull afternoon with glimpses of bright sunlight and dark shadows.

I find many of the normally sandy beaches here have a lot of stones on them recently, as the sand appears to have been dragged out with the storms. I hope the sand comes back with more storms. It does come and go a lot.

These birds were enjoying some quiet down time until I came along – they weren’t long moving.

Winter sea swimming has become so popular these days. They say it does wonders for your health. I’m not convinced.

Doubt if they expected waves this size!

Oops – they’re gone! They did re-appear.

Mount Brandon with a bright fluffy hat.

These cows were quietly enjoying the view over the sea.

I hope you enjoyed this trip to the local with me. These and many other photos of this beach and other local trips in the Ballyferriter area can be seen on this link:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/ballyferriter

TRÁBEG, KINARD, KERRY

These photos are from Trábeg Strand, a small and often dramatic wild beach in the Kinard West area on the south side of the Dingle Peninsula.

It’s pot luck whether you get any sunshine when you go out for a walk here, and after a promising start to the morning, the sky clouded over before getting there.😕

This is also one of those wild places to which photographers are drawn for those really turbulent sea images. This was not the best day for that, with the swells of last night’s gales already dying down.

Not to be deterred, I thought, I’m here now so I’ll make the best of it. I lived close to this beach many years ago, before digital photography. I haven’t been back many times since. (Wonder where all those 35mm prints are now!) 

This is the entrance to the beach. – Very stoney at the moment. In my previous life here I observed the sand come in and go out frequently with the storms. Now it appears more stoney than ever. I was also very surprised how high the water level was, considering it was only an hour away from low tide. I expected to be able to walk around the rocks to different sections of the beach at this time, but not so. A low spring tide should be ok – next time!

 

This large stack here is a very familiar landmark, which can be seen from many high places, particularly the Conor Pass road, shown below, on another day.

The sea stack is called The Searrach (Siorrach), there are often alternative name variations and spellings here. The Searrach means foal.

Every photographer who comes here wants to get a good big splash on the Searrach. I just have to be content with the stack and no big splash pictures. The water, though rough, just wasn’t quite wild enough.  Must find those old prints!

 

 

 

 

It really didn’t feel safe on the beach, you can’t trust the ocean, when it’s rough and the beach is small. We didn’t stay for long.  I’ll definitely have to go back.

For some of my images of the wider Kerry area check out this tag for Kerry Coast Images

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/kerry+coast+images

Thanks for viewing my post, and keep safe.

 

DUNQUIN VIEWS

Fluffy clouds, Dunquin. Below the horizon stands the Blasket Centre, which provides information and history about the vibrant community that once lived on Great Blasket Island, the larger island on the left, below.

Just below the Blasket Centre on the coast, this very nice new viewing platform has been built on the cliff, at a cost of €2.25million+ !!! I have heard that the rusty effect alone was a substantial part of the expense.

There are stunning views of the Blasket Island group from the Dunquin coast. This is on the Dingle Peninsula, County Kerry, South West Ireland.

More coastal views from Dunquin.

These shots were taken on Dunmore Head, which is nearest to the islands. Here there is another of those World War 2 lookout shelters, of which there are several around the coast. Unfortunately they don’t look very pretty.

An Ogham Stone stands on Dunmore Head. So named because it has some of the ancient Ogham script carved on it. Ogham is an Early Medieval alphabet used to write the early Irish language, and later the Old Irish language. (Pronounced Ohm, it has a silent G). Dingle Peninsula has a large percentage of the country’s Ogham Stones.

Couminole Beach, not very obvious here because the tide is high and the sandy area is covered over. It’s a beautiful beach for a saunter and a few photos, but not so safe. Nevertheless, my walking companions went down for a swim – yes in January! I didn’t venture down on this occasion as I was in a hurry.

The steep path to Dunquin Pier can be seen in the above photo.

I have to show these shots of this beautiful horse with his long mane!

This friend of mine, Lisa, likes to feed him daily with her vegetable peelings and give him a bit of attention, as she passes on her daily walks in Dunquin.

Lisa has named him Gruaig Fhada, which simply means Long Hair. Her own hair makes them a good match.

I have never seen a horse with such a long mane before! I assume he is a shire horse.

He is rather lovely, isn’t he?

So hard to see his dark eye in that black patch. I don’t know how he can graze with that hair in his eyes!

On my website there are many photos and a few paintings of the Dunquin area, including captures of Couminole Beach which I bypassed above:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/dunquin.

Also some animals and wildlife on this tag:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c101-animals–birds-and-other-nature-photos

I appreciate your visit. I hope you like my views of Dunquin, do come again.

FROM WEST KERRY TO WEST CORK

 

Here are several of the photos I took while on a trip to the Beara Peninsula of West Cork, from The Dingle Peninsula, West Kerry.

Driving along the Dingle Peninsula on the Inch road, the morning water was so calm and blue, with the mountains of the Iveragh Peninsula of South Kerry in view, I stopped for a few captures here.

Going through the Killarney National Park area, I stopped for more views.  I also took many of the Gap of Dunloe, which I previously published, so I will bypass them in this post.

 

 

At Moll’s Gap, still in County Kerry, here is Molly Gallivan’s 200 year old cottage, a visitor’s centre, traditional farm, museum, local crafts shop and cafe.  Molly Gallivan was a widow with seven children in the nineteenth century who employed her tremendous personal resources to support her family with her small farm, running a shebeen, poteen making (illegal alcohol), traditional handicrafts, providing sustenance to passing travellers etc….)

The wood carving of the druid represents the people who originally inhabited this area more than 6,000 years ago.

Seeing the oil tanker here I realised that Whiddy Island oil terminal was across the water here. This was the scene of a horrific disaster in 1979, when there was a fire and explosion on the French oil tanker The Betelgeuse, where 50 people lost their lives. There are ongoing issues about this.

 

Hungry Hill, the mountain above, is one of the Caha range of the Beara Peninsula. We took a route over the very scenic Healy Pass which transverses the Beara Peninsula.

 

Glanmore Lake, on the Healy Pass.

 

 

 

 

Here we are lost, but enjoying the views and taking lots of photos. I asked directions in a local shop, but a staff member there gave wrong directions. Aside from time being short – it’s a long drive back to Dingle, I enjoyed the ride!

 

The remnants of Shronebirrane Stone Circle can be seen in this field below, which I now know is in Drimminboy Valley.

 

 

Now I think this is the Adrigole region…..

 

 

 

 

After a long drive, back now on the Dingle Peninsula below, just as the sun was setting and casting a pink glow on Inch Beach.

Thanks for viewing my photos. If you would like to see more images of the Beara peninsula, West Cork, (many of them taken on an earlier trip), please check out my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/beara+peninsula

I managed to do another trip to West Cork before our current level 5 Covid-19 restrictions started. Please come back again to see photos of Baltimore, Cape Clear Island and the Mizen Peninsula.

GAP OF DUNLOE

These photos are from the Gap of Dunloe, a narrow mountain pass in County Kerry, in the South West of Ireland. It separates the MacGillycuddy’s Reeks mountain range in the west, from the Purple Mountain Group range in the east.  It’s a lovely scenic route from Killarney to the West County Cork area, an alternative to the faster N71 main road.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jaunting cars for tourists operate between 7.30am and 6.pm and can make the journey very slow and tedious for those driving cars. The jarveys (jaunting car drivers) don’t always like to enable motor cars to pass them.

However, I am sure the jaunting cars offer a great way of slowly taking in the wonderful scenery, and no doubt the jarveys are a great source of local knowledge.

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I really appreciate your visit to my post. If you would like to view more photos of the Killarney area and Iveragh Peninsula (Ring of Kerry), please visit my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c87-photographs-of-the-iveragh-peninsula-and-killarney

 

 

CLOSE TO HOME

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Looking beyond my garden, all these photos were taken within a hundred meters of my house.  I call this road above and below the escape road. I look forward to being able to move around with freedom again – sometime.

The three peaks above are known as the Three Sisters.

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Cruach Mharhain is the mountain above. This is a nice one for a walk – short and steep – keep you fit!

 

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Mount Eagle is to the left of Cruach Mharhain above, in the distance. Another lovely walk.

 

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Thanks so much for viewing. Stay Safe!

 

WILD AND FREE

Wild and free as we would like to be – just now, during this Covid-19 lockdown! This post features more wild flowers and insects, in and around my garden, where I search for inspiration to create interesting images, while I’m staying at home.

There are reports of people getting complacent and stealing out and about where they should not go, and I completely understand them. The longer we are restricted, the harder it is. But wandering around the garden with my camera is very absorbing and I have enjoyed being more observant about the little things that appear around my home.

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These delightful white flowers are actually very small and they are called cuckoo flowers.

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Known as speedwell apparently, these very small blue ones, but when I was a child we called them sore eyes, for some reason. I may have been misinformed. There is another little white flower called eyebright. Perhaps it was confused with that one.

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Primroses, above

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There is at least a few varieties of dragon fly in my garden. This is the first I’ve seen this year. It’s a very skinny fellow, blue and black. I love the large all blues, but I haven’t seen any yet this year. I find it very difficult to capture them – they don’t like you to get too close, and my lens is not particularly suitable for this type of photography.

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Mid flight, above.

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A lovely speckled wood butterfly on the apple blossom.

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Dandelion seed heads.

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In my youth we used to blow the seeds off these, saying – he loves me – he loves me not -he loves me….. whatever happens on the last blow would be the truth. I don’t think we ever believed it and certainly not if it turned up a negative final statement! We had fun that cost nothing, and didn’t require any digital technology – there wasn’t any!

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Buttercups, of course, and with a fly below.

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Red clover.

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Ribwort plantain, above and below. It has a brown insect on it in these photos.

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Ragged dandelions, just for the variety. I’ll have to get better images of these next time.

One thought that often occurs to me is that for the first time in my living memory, there are people all over the world now who are living the same restricted lifestyle, coping with the same difficulties that come with those restrictions, listening to the same WHO reports and advice and extending themselves in terms of creativity and development in ways that otherwise may never have happened. In the most unexpected way we have a common uniting force, we are communicating more than we did before Covid-19 arrived, albeit digitally. We can understand the issues affecting others in far away countries from ourselves, in a much more empathetic way than ever before, I think.

DO STAY SAFE!

SUNSET ON MY DOORSTEP

DSC_2349 ballyferriter sunsetYou can never tell when you are going to get a really brilliant sunset. Tonight’s glory crept up on me with my back turned to the west. I had to run outside with my camera to grab something before it disappeared altogether.

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Only last night I was beach walking at sunset (see this mornings post) and it was only an ok sunset, but tonight when I was in my home it took me by surprise. I was not about to ignore it –  even though I have so, so many captures of sunsets from this spot.

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Thanks so much for visiting. Many sunset photos from several countries on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/sunset

Enquiries can be made from my website.

Stay safe

 

BREAKING WAVES

These were not gigantic waves,  just ordinary everyday waves on the Atlantic Ocean, West Kerry, but I zoomed in close to them to capture the individual character of each one or group. Many were taken from the same spot, and the others were from very nearby, in the Ballinrannig area of Ballyferriter, near Dingle, in the South West of Ireland.

 

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If you like seascape photos, please check out my website. Try this tag:

http://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/seascape+photos