MORE THAN A WEEK

corona times

It’s more than a week now into partial shutdown and social isolation. it’s good to live in a place where one can still walk and enjoy the fresh air and lovely views.

These photos are on Béal Bán (White Mouth), Ballyferriter, on the Dingle Peninsula, County Kerry.

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Just thought I’m mention again that the above rocky ridge, Sybil Head (Ceann Sibéal), was a film location of Star Wars – The Last Jedi, during 2016.

Covid-19 doesn’t stop the rainbows. I unfortunately missed the best brilliance of this rainbow while on the long winding road from the main road to the beach, but here are some captures of it, sorry if they look a little like some previously posted shots – same place but different rainbow.

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I noticed a runner stop to look at a bird near the water’s edge on the beach. I stopped to enquire was there something wrong with the bird and he informed me that it was a fulmar, which normally spends all its life at sea and has very limited walking skills. I guess it needs to propel itself in water in order to fly up. I hope it survived the several dogs that were running free on the beach. They know nothing about social distancing!

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As I went on my way I realised that I may have slightly transgressed the recommended social distance in that conversation. So difficult to remember all the time, in this place where people are normally very sociable!

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St. Patrick’s Day on Tuesday demonstrated the real spirit of the people in the country, who created their own mini parades, in their back gardens with their children, and with musicians in some cases, and recorded them of course!

This week brought some very amusing corona virus inspired videos to my phone, including one of a couple of guys planting toilet rolls! That did make me laugh out loud.

It was no surprise that there were no toilet rolls at the supermarket, but I got everything I needed. Only one person allowed in the pharmacy at one time.

No swimming, no pub music sessions (I play flute), no weekly gathering of musicians at my house.

My own gallery is closed to visitors, but trading online or by phone is still an option.

This is just a microcosm of Corona virus imposed changes in my tiny insignificant world.  But the real concern is the health of individuals affected by the virus, and then for the economy and the loss of jobs and stress and strain on people’s lives, all over the world. 

But nature continues to provide us with its wonderful gifts. Here are two photos of this week’s sunsets, which I have also covered in my previous two posts.

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The birds are still singing in the garden. They are still fluttering around the bird feeder. I found some small but tasty broccoli florets that had been developing quietly and gave me a nice surprise. I had written off the broccoli plants! The wind has been so fierce and persistent this past few months.

Good health to you all and your dearest.

 


A COLLECTION OF KERRY RAINBOWS

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I love rainbows.  I mean I really love when that arc of vibrant colour appears in the sky after some dark dismal weather, and the sun breaks through the shower and creates this wonderful image.  I live in West Kerry, on the Dingle Peninsula in the South West of Ireland.  We have a lot of stormy wet weather, especially recently. Over the years I have accumulated a lot of rainbow phtotos, and although I have previously published some of them  in different contexts,  I just wanted to show some of my collection of rainbows here.

Most of the images will show a clearer and sharper version when you click on them

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The above photos were all taken in the Emlagh East area, Ballyferriter.

Below are several images from Cuas, by Brandon Creek.

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The cottage in the above photos has been undergoing renovation recently, and looks in a somewhat better shape now.

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From the Conor Pass road, above, with Mount Brandon under cloud and beautiful corrie lakes.

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On Murioch Beach, above. Below are three photos from Béal Bán Beach

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On Wine Strand above, with snow on Mount Brandon.  Wine strand was so called because according to local folklore, several casks of wine were washed up here after the wrecking of the Spanish Armada in 1588.

The rest of the photos below were taken from the towpath by the canal in Tralee.

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Check out some more rainbow images on the website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/rainbow

Thanks for viewing my post.

THE LAST CRASHES OF STORM DENNIS

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On Béal Bán Beach (White Mouth), Ballyferriter, near Dingle, in the South West Of Ireland, Storm Dennis was beginning to ease, though still pretty fierce, with wild squalls arising frequently. In the above photo, Mount Brandon enjoys a few fleeting patches of sunlight.

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This is a relatively sheltered bay, while above, the humpy, lumpy mountainous shapes on the horizon are actually huge ocean swells.

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The rock in these two photos is known as Carraig Dubh (Black Rock).

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And then came the rainbow. I waited in my van for a heavy shower to pass, and hoped for a rainbow. I nearly missed it – it was so fleeting.

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When I was a child, I was told that if I found the end of a rainbow there would be a pot of gold there.  I frequently see complete rainbows with both ends in Kerry, but no gold!  I once drove into the end of a rainbow on a motorway.  It disintegrated as I approached. I had a lottery ticket already purchased for that evening’s draw.  I thought surely………. no such luck!

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More seascape photos can be seen on this link:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/seascape+photos

Thanks for visiting my post. I hope you have enjoyed it.

RAINBOW WITH SHEEP AT CUAS, BALLYDAVID

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At the foot of Mount Brandon, Dingle Peninsula, on a very showery September evening with sunny spells.

More photos taken in evening light on my website http://helene-brennan.com/tag/evening+light

WILD FLOWERS AND RAINBOWS (2)

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One very showery evening with sunny spells – perfect for rainbows – at Cuas, Ballydavid, on the Dingle Peninsula. The warm evening light escaping from the dark clouds enhances the brilliance of the montbretias at the roadside.

More rainbow photos on my website http://helene-brennan.com/tag/rainbow 

WILD FLOWERS AND RAINBOWS

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Rainbow and Wild Flowers on the road to Ballyferriter from Dingle.

Hi there! It’s been some time since you last saw me here. I just took a break from blogging and some other online activities due to constraints related to moving house. Very limited electricity and internet service made it just too challenging to continue blogging. The house move still isn’t complete, the internet is still basic and slow, but I have electricity. I hope it won’t take more than a few more months to complete the process.

Of course I have continued to take photos, though my painting is on the back burner. After several months spent in the lovely location of Ballyheigue, I have moved back to the Dingle Peninsula. It’s surely one of the most stunning places in the world. In fact, National Geographic Traveler has described the Dingle Peninsula as “the most beautiful place on earth”. I agree.

Weather is never predictable here, and very often it’s the weather that makes the image. Looking at many of my photos and paintings you will see that light, shadows, clouds, rough seas and rainbows are essential features in the compositions.

This summer has seen some of the coldest and the wettest weather in about 30 years here. However, the old saying that every cloud has a silver lining can perhaps be applied, as frequent showery and sunny spells have also brought the most lovely rainbows.

The above photo shows one of those fleeting rainbows that suddenly appear, the road to Ballyferriter from Dingle, with the iconic Three Sisters in the distance and stunning wild flowers in the field and by the roadside.

Please take time to view Dingle Peninsula photos on my website http://helene-brennan.com/c25-dingle-peninsula-photos

Thank you for looking at my blog.