WILD ATLANTIC WALK

These photos were taken from Clogher Beach and the cliff walk to Cuas na nEighe from the beach. This is the place for massive, wild and wonderful waves, where many people – photographers and others go to capture the Atlantic wildness, or just to observe and enjoy it.

This rock above can send the most enormous splash way up to the sky. Photographers love to catch this moment. It always happens just when you take your eye off the ball, in a manner of speaking. I’ve seen some arrive with their tripods and camera pointed at the rock, ready for the event, and not being side-tracked by any of the lovely dancing light on the spray etc. They leave as soon as they capture it. Nothing else matters.

If you follow my posts you would have seen many other photos from this place, but as I often say, it changes every day, with the wind and the light.

Lace-like patterns swoosh towards the beach.

The island above right is Inis Tuaisceart, one of the Blasket Island group, commonly known as The Sleeping Giant, or locally known as Fear Marbh (Dead Man). It appears in many of my photos and paintings.

The Island in the distance above is another Blasket Island, the Tiaracht. It resembles the Great Skellig Rock, near the Iveragh Peninsula of South Kerry. Many people get confused with it,

I love these dancing shapes riding on top of the water, with the spray flying in the wind.

The next six images are from Cuas na nEighe, one of the most wild and wonderful places on the Dingle Peninsula, in my view.

At Cuas na nEighe, with Sybil Head in view.

These big splashes are so irresistable.

On the return towards Clogher Beach.

I hope you enjoy these coastal pics.

More Clogher Beach and Cosán na nEighe images

Thanks so much for visiting.

2020 – A POTTED PERSONAL REVIEW IN PHOTOS

2020 for me started in the beautiful state of Mizoram, in North East India, where I spent Christmas and New Year. Here is the city of Aizawl, built on mountain peaks, and with wonderful sunsets.

Back home to the Dingle Penninsula, in the South West of Ireland, to enjoy, endure, survive the winter storms and the powerful, magnetic and awe inspiring Atlantic Ocean.

And experience the beautiful beach walks!

But….who could have thought…the dreadful Covid-19 came along and threw us all sideways – or worse, in some cases.

I had planned a trip to Italy in March, but had to cancel. Social life was on hold for most people.

Luckily, I was still able to walk and capture the beautiful coastal images – for a while longer, before restrictions became stricter.

More time to study the birds in my garden, through the window.

As a little experiment I recorded myself playing flute with the bird song in the garden. If the image looks upside down to you, it will correct itself when you click it.

Local sunset, below.

Lockdown to a greater or lesser extend affected all of us, world over. Our individual experience of the world became very small, as we were obliged to reduce our social contacts and curtail travel. Many shops and pubs were closed. My regular trad Irish music sessions in local pubs, where I joined in with my flute were cancelled, indefinitely!

For a time my photography focused on my immediate area, and the garden. These sunsets from around the house and very local area take on a caged appearance, as indeed we were caged, all of us, in some measure.

I am very lucky that the local area has many beautiful places for walking. beaches were closed for some weeks, but cliff walks were possible.

My birthday celebration was a cliff walk, with friends. It was lovely.

Much garden navel gazing was undertaken. I never took so many photos of flowers and garden creatures before.

I never before appreciated how beautiful apple blossom can be.

Wildflowers became objects of scrutiny and much enjoyment too.

So many bees in the garden!

– And I discovered just how photogenic the humble daisies can be.

Thistles too!

I am so thankful for my good luck in being able to take many coastal walks.

Seaside and flowers together here. Lovely sea pinks make a wonderful show in early summer.

Beaches finally opened again, in June, I think. It’s all a bit blurred in my memory now, as Covid-19 figures rose and fell and lockdowns went in and out of different levels of severity.

Tourists returned in full force to the Dingle area in the summer, much to the relief of those whose livlihoods depend on tourism.

Sunsets around my area continue to fascinate, less cage-like with the summer foliage.

Lovely coastal and mountain walks. These photos were from different sides of Mount Brandon.

I updated my photos of Dingle Harbour, and took several shots around the town of Dingle.

The swallows raised two families in my shed. These first day out fledgling swallows only had a couple of weeks to grow strong before their long flight to South Africa. I wonder if they made it.

Some apple trees did bear fruit, though hundreds of babies were blown off the trees in summer storms before they were ready to eat. This is the entire harvest from several young trees.

Exploring beyond my own area, as easing of Covid restrictions permitted, I visited Killarney, South Kerry, West Cork and more.

The Gap of Dunloe, near Killarney.

On Cape Clear Island, above, off the coast of West Cork.

The small mainland harbour, Baltimore, County Cork, below.

Back on local Ventry Beach, below.

In October, a cruel hand was served on Dingle. After a several months of Covid-19 related hardships, Fungie, the globally famous Dingle Dolphin disappeared, without trace. Fungie, a wild dolphin has lived in Dingle Harbour of his own free will for 37 years. He was probably about 45 years old. Missed by many, whether they made a fortune running Fungie tourist trips, or whether they were just people who loved to see and play with the dolphin. For sure, Dingle will be a different place without him. This was a major event here. It’s not easy to explain how this wild, free dolphin touched the hearts of Dingle people and many visitors from around the world.

I have no photos of Fungie, preferring to leave that to the Fungiephiles who had developed considerable expertise. Here is a video from Jeannine Masset and Rudi Schamhardt.

More local captures below.

Fungie is gone, but the Dingle Peninsula remains the same beautiful place.

An autumn forest walk, above, in Glanteenassig Wood, on the Dingle Peninsula.

December shots from Mount Eagle, below.

The Blasket Islands, above.


Snow on Mount Brandon, shot from the garden, heralding the coming of Christmas 2020

On Christmas Day on a local Ballyferriter beach, Béal Bán, some brave swimmers rushed into the cold water, with an air temperature of about 8 degrees C. I did not partake, I prefer to stick to the heated pool these days. But it was fun to be there and support them.

Recent Storm Bella, seemed to last for about three days.

I completed a number of paintings this year, and failed to complete several more – so far. I’ve dicovered that I can be more motivated in that field when I have more activity in general in my life. The slower pace of things this year seemed to diminish my motivation in the more demanding creative side.

Now we are in a 3rd wave of the Corona Virus, with a new more transmissable variant of the virus in the country. In fact a case was discovered in Dingle recently. We have a high level lockdown again, going even stricter after today, but vaccines have arrived in the country; I for one will not hesitate to take advantage when it’s my turn.

So now 2021 approaches. May you all be lucky enough to only have contact with those people who are honest, compassionate and kind, who treat you as they would wish to be treated, and I wish the best of health and happiness to you all. HAPPY NEW YEAR!

STORM BELLA

Storm Bella has been blowing for a couple of days now. Today I went out for a few shots of big waves, hoping it wouldn’t be too challenging for me.

These photos were taken in the Ballydavid area of the Dingle Peninsula, in the South West of Ireland.

I have to say it was indeed difficult to stand up to the cold strong North West winds, while being battered by rain, hail and sea spray. My fingers went numb, making it difficult to manage the controls on my camera. Keeping my lens clean was impossible. I had to continually wipe it, only to create a smeared affect on the lens. The spray was relentless.  I lost a lot of good images through having a foggy lens.

The results weren’t the best I’ve ever done, but I’m glad I went out and got the fresh air. In these covid days we have to make an effort.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for visiting. If you enjoy images of turbulent sea, please visit my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/turbulent+sea

STILL STORMY 2

DSC_2065 ballinrannig

These photos were taken shortly before those in my previous post STILL STORMY. It was very windy. I was at Ballinrannig, Ballyferriter, on the Dingle Peninsula, South West Ireland. All these photos were taken from close to the small car park, viewing all around from there.

DSC_2096 ballinrannig big wave splash

 

DSC_2112 ballinrannig

 

DSC_2083 ballinrannig wave with black rock

 

DSC_2066 ballinrannig

 

DSC_2070 ballinrannig

 

 

DSC_2113 ballinrannig

 

DSC_2107

 

DSC_2061 ballinrannig black rock

 

DSC_2094

 

DSC_2132

 

DSC_2128

 

DSC_2125 ballinrannig

 

DSC_2118 ballinrannig

 

DSC_2078 birds at ballinrannig

 

DSC_2090 2

For more Ballyferriter images, here’s a Ballyferriter tag-link to my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/ballyferriter

Thanks for your visit. I hope you have enjoyed my pics.

STILL STORMY

DSC_2001 clogher

The storms seem relentless this year. These shots are from Clogher Beach, on the Dingle Peninsula, South West Ireland, a favourite spot for rough sea fans.

DSC_1975 flurry of foam clogher

With a powerful wind blowing from the sea, the biggest challenge was keeping the lens free of the salty sea spray. So many potentially lovely photos ruined by wet blobs on the lens, and the salty water certainly won’t do my camera or lens any good. On this occasion there was continual wet spray.  In the above photo, I caught one of the frequent flurries of foam blobs that blew up from the crashing waves.

DSC_1968 clogher splash

It was difficult to get any colour into these photos. I tried converting to black and white but in the end went back to the coloured pics, slightly strange though they may appear.

DSC_1934 - sleeping giant clogher

 

DSC_1949 clogher and sleeping giant

 

DSC_1954 clogher

 

DSC_1957 clogher sleeping giant

 

 

DSC_1971

 

DSC_1974 clogher

 

 

DSC_2003 clogher

 

DSC_2052 sleeping giant clogher bw

Moving around to the cliff at the right hand side of the beach, you can see the shape of the beach with it’s foamy frothy water (below). It was shortly before a very high tide.

DSC_1992 Clogher Beach

You can see paintings and photos of the Clogher Beach area on the following link to my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/clogher+beach

I appreciate your visit, thank you.

THE LAST CRASHES OF STORM DENNIS

DSC_1578 beal ban rough sea

On Béal Bán Beach (White Mouth), Ballyferriter, near Dingle, in the South West Of Ireland, Storm Dennis was beginning to ease, though still pretty fierce, with wild squalls arising frequently. In the above photo, Mount Brandon enjoys a few fleeting patches of sunlight.

DSC_1575

 

DSC_1576 2

 

DSC_1577

 

DSC_1581 beal ban rough sea

 

DSC_1585

 

DSC_1587

This is a relatively sheltered bay, while above, the humpy, lumpy mountainous shapes on the horizon are actually huge ocean swells.

DSC_1590

The rock in these two photos is known as Carraig Dubh (Black Rock).

DSC_1597 beal ban

And then came the rainbow. I waited in my van for a heavy shower to pass, and hoped for a rainbow. I nearly missed it – it was so fleeting.

DSC_1612

 

DSC_1608 rainbow

When I was a child, I was told that if I found the end of a rainbow there would be a pot of gold there.  I frequently see complete rainbows with both ends in Kerry, but no gold!  I once drove into the end of a rainbow on a motorway.  It disintegrated as I approached. I had a lottery ticket already purchased for that evening’s draw.  I thought surely………. no such luck!

DSC_1609 rainbow

 

DSC_1618

 

DSC_1621

More seascape photos can be seen on this link:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/seascape+photos

Thanks for visiting my post. I hope you have enjoyed it.

BEAUTY AND THE BEASTS

The storms are coming think and fast these days. Fierce though they are, they provide a wonderful magnetic attraction, particularly around our coasts, for along with the beasts that they are, they create powerful spectacles in the form of giant waves, massive splashes and magnificent movement.

DSC_1369

 

DSC_1374

 

DSC_1378

 

DSC_0086

 

DSC_0044

 

DSC_1434 cosan na neighe

 

DSC_1463

 

DSC_1464 cosan na neighe

 

DSC_1468 cosan na neighe

 

DSC_1470

 

DSC_0031

 

DSC_0025

 

DSC_9873 sybil Head

 

DSC_1479 cosan na neighe

 

DSC_1486 cosan na neighe

 

DSC_1487 cosan na neighe

 

DSC_1490 cosan na neighe

 

DSC_1504 cosan na neighe

 

DSC_1510 cosan na neighe

Thank you so much for viewing my post. If you like stormy sea images, check out this tag on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/rough+sea

BIG PAINTINGS

Atlantic Movement

Atlantic Movement

These are quite large paintings. Oil on canvas, 150 x 100 cms (60 x 40 inches approximately), inspired by the wonderful coastal imagery of the Dingle Peninsula, South West Ireland.

I think that large paintings are difficult to show sympathetically on a website. The larger the painting, the greater the reduction of the image. This has the effect of making the image look much more tightly painted than it is in reality. It’s always worth bearing that in mind when viewing paintings on the internet. These here can be viewed much larger if you click them, and you may still be able to open out the image and see the style of the brush-marks more clearly, and be able to evaluate the freedom of the style or the discipline that is employed.

I have been sitting on these for several months, in a manner of speaking. This is the first time I have shown them on my blog. They are on my website on this page:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c863-new-paintings-2018—2020

I needed to wait for at least 6 months before applying varnish. Many painters are not aware of the need to wait and may apply the varnish too soon. As yet most of these are not varnished, except the one I have sold (Blasket Islands).

The purpose of varnish is to protect the picture, but if it is applied too soon it fuses into the paint below, and cannot in the future be removed if desired. It might never need to be removed in the life of the picture, but it’s best to follow good practice, as the varnish yellows with age.

Some painters think it’s best to not use varnish at all, as it can create problems of its own. Large paintings in particular are difficult to varnish evenly. It’s not strictly necessary to varnish, and many painters use an oiling out technique to bring up the colours and create an even sheen on the picture. I sometimes do this myself. An oil painting, once completely dry will have a washable surface and as long as it is kept in a clean unpolluted environment there should be no real problems. Most people do not now smoke inside their homes, and this has removed the main polluting agent in one’s home.

Steamy Atlantic Spray

Steamy Atlantic Spray

 

atlantic splash 9169Atlantic Splash

 

Rushing Wave in the Wind 9172Rushing Wave in the Wind

 

DSC_9173 west coast

West Coast

 

DSC_9281 blasket Islands

Blasket Islands

 

131731 blaskets

View of Mainland from Great Blasket Island

I would be delighted to respond to any questions that anyone would have. Please enquire through my website.

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c863-new-paintings-2018—2020

For those of you who might be in my area, I have a gallery, showing these large paintings and several smaller paintings. Here is the big paintings room. Directions on Google. I look forward to meeting you.104718 gallery big paintings

 

SYMPHONY ON SEA, ATLANTIC MOVEMENT

Several photos of surface effects of the powerful Atlantic Ocean, in the wake of Storm Hannah, Dingle Peninsula, Ireland.

Turbulent sea _8227-

Turbulent sea _8192-

Turbulent sea _8175-

Turbulent sea _8176-

Turbulent sea _8178-

Turbulent sea _8190-

Turbulent sea _8196-

Turbulent sea _8201-

Turbulent sea _8202-

Turbulent sea _8205-

Turbulent sea _8209-

Turbulent sea _8224-

Turbulent sea _8229-

Turbulent sea 8171-

turbulent sea 8228-

Turbulent sea_8193-

Thanks for viewing my post. Please visit my website for more photos of the seascapes of the Dingle Peninsula.

http://www.helene-brennan.com/c25–photos-of-dingle-peninsula

WINTER IN PAPHOS, CYPRUS

The following photos are somewhat randomly presented, but they give the flavour of the frequent shift from warm sunshine to stormy weather in Cyprus in the winter time.