THE MAGIC OF LIGHT

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Many times I have taken photos of the same subject, and each one is so different. Every photographer knows this. How the light quality can change the colours, the hue, the mood, temperature, and often the beauty and attractiveness of an image!

In these photos of boats at Zygi Harbour in Cyprus, A dramatic stormy sky combined with the golden light of a late winter’s afternoon offered wonderfully vivid photographic potential. The Cypriot fishing boats, which are very colourful subjects, gave added intensity to the images.

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Lots more photos of Cyprus on my website: 

http://helene-brennan.com/c857-cyprus

WEST KERRY SUNSETS (3)

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Sunset behind Inis Tuaisceart (Sleeping Giant)

 

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Rainbow in the light of the setting sun at Cuas 

 

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Blasket Islands

 

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Ventry Beach with view of Mount Eagle

 

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Ventry Beach

 

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Sunset behind Inis Vickillane of the Blasket Islands

 

 

WEST KERRY SUNSETS (2)

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Blasket Islands

 

 

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Emlagh, Ballyferriter

 

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Emlagh, Ballyferriter

 

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Mid-summer sunset at Ceann Seatha

 

 

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Ventry Beach

 

 

Lots more photos from the Dingle Peninsula, West Kerry, on my website:

http://www.helene-brennan.com/c25-dingle-peninsula-photos

TIME CHANGES EVERYTHING – AT COURTOWN

 

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It’s not often that I get across to the east coast of this country nowadays, but I recently made a short visit to Courtown, in County Wexford. The weather wasn’t great, the sunshine was scarce and the light was dull, but I grabbed a few opportunities to capture some images

It must be said that Courtown once had the most perfect beach in the world – with a marvellous expanse of dry, soft, clean, golden sand. The water depth was perfect and safe for swimming. Admittedly, it didn’t have the fabulous scenery of the Kerry beaches, with which I am now very familiar, but the quality of the beach itself was second to none. Sunshine was always more plentiful in that part of the country too. I have no photos of what it was like before – but OMG – look what is is now!

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What happened to all the lovely sand?

It’s an understatement to say that erosion has taken its toll. Tons of boulders have been deposited to ‘protect’ the coastline. Time has shown once again that nothing stays the same.

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Bathing still continues between the piles of boulders

It’s good to see that there are still some gaps in the mountains of boulders, where families can enjoy the sun, sand and sea.

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Weather shows its visual charms

 

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A glimpse of normality

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Off shore activities are definitely more popular now

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Less beach – more sea. You win some, you lose some!

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Swimmers still enjoy the beach

 

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The wood by the beach

The opening of woodland trails do compensate in part for the loss of so much beach

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The beach, viewed from the wood

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The woodland trail is really lovely

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View of the woodland from the beach

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Storm torn trees. Winter storms have wreaked havoc on them also

But alas, the woodland was not safe either from the ferocious storms of last winter.

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Graffiti on a storm felled tree

Graffiti on this storm felled tree on the beach echoes my thoughts about transience and change, although I could not read the full sentence that once was there.

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Great for the stove – if I could carry  it home!

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I quite liked these natural sculptures that have landed on the beach

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More of nature’s offerings

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Many pieces already chopped – presumably for the home fires

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The last rays of sun creep up along the RNLI boathouse

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Evening walk as the sun goes down

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Something for all ages in Courtown

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Even the dodgems look different

Please check out my other photos of County Wexford on my website:

http://helene-brennan.com/c97-photos-of–county-wexford-

OCTOBER EVENING ON MURIOCH BEACH.

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To see more Dingle Peninsula photos please visit my website: http://helene-brennan.com/c25-dingle-peninsula-photos

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Please see my website for more Murioch photos: http://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/murioch

SPECTACULAR SUNSET, DINGLE PENINSULA.

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Last night, I happened to suddenly look up from my task on the computer and saw a spectacularly red sky. Naturally, I grabbed my camera and ran out to capture some of  this amazing event. After hurriedly capturing about 20 images – or so I thought – I discovered to my great annoyance and disappointment that I had forgotten to return the memory card to the camera, and not one image had been recorded. So, I raced back to get the card and out again to catch something before this marvellous phenomenon disappeared altogether. Of course I missed the best of it, but in spite of my rush I managed to get several images that give some flavour of the brilliance of the colour of the sky.

The location is Ballyferriter, DIngle Peninsula, County Kerry, Ireland. The rocky ridge of Sybil Head (Ceann Sibéal) is visible on the skyline.

No edits were made to the colours, just minor changes using levels.

Please visit my website http://helene-brennan.com/c25-dingle-peninsula-photos for more photos of the Dingle Peninsula

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