WEST KERRY SUNSETS (4)

More pictures of one of the wonders of the west of Ireland.  These photos were taken on Cosán na nEighe, a coastal walk next to Clogher Beach, Dingle Peninsula, County Kerry. Loads more photos of this area on my website:

http://www.helene-brennan.com/c25-dingle-peninsula-photos

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Thanks for visiting my blog. I hope you enjoy the photos. If you like sunsets please check out my previous posts of West Kerry Sunsets.

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STAR WARS IN KERRY

This post was updated in November 2017.

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I have previously written about the film Ryan’s Daughter, which was largely shot on the Dingle Peninsula, and how it brought the beauty of the place to the attention of the world and stimulated the tourism industry in the area.

Not only tourism was stimulated, several other movies followed, which were also partly shot in County Kerry. Here is a list of some movies shot in Kerry since Ryan’s Daughter:

Star Wars: The Last Jedi 2016

Star Wars: The Force Awakens 2015

The Field (1990)

Far and Away (1992)

Harry Potter and the Half-blood Prince (2009)

Excalibur (1981)

The most recent Star Wars movie – The Last Jedi was partly shot on Sybil Head (Ceann Sibéal) on the stunning Dingle Peninsula.

 

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Sybil Head, is a majestically beautiful place, having a commanding, yet magical presence, adjacent to a collection of other stunning iconic landmarks to be seen from the roadside of the famous Slea Head Drive from Dingle.

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Sybil Head in a Storm oil pastels, above.

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Sybil Head from Cruach Mharhain above.

The Force Awakens was partly shot at Skellig Michael, a World Heritage site, off the coast of the Iveragh Peninsula, South Kerry, amid much controversy regarding the damage they may do to the ecology and the antiquities on the island.

The Skellig Rocks are two rather spectacular looking tall craggy rocks rising up from the Wild Atlantic Ocean; there is also a third but smaller rock known as The Lemon. Skellig Michael, or Great Skellig, 714 feet tall, is an ancient monastic site where in the sixth to eighth centuries AD, a community of monks built their monastery – a number of beehive shaped stone dwellings and oratories, and lived their lives there, in considerable hardship and isolation 12 miles from the mainland of Ireland.

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Skellig Rocks, oil on canvas, above.

I have a number of paintings and photos of these famous and spectacular landmarks. Please click the images to see more information about any of them

http://www.worldheritageireland.ie/skellig-michael/

To help you locate these peninsulas: The south west of Ireland has three magnificently beautiful peninsulas. Two of them are in County Kerry – the Dingle Peninsula, and the Iveragh Peninsula (Ring of Kerry), going south, and the most southerly one is in County Cork – the Beara Peninsula (West Cork).

More information can be found on:

http://entertainment.ie/cinema/news/Pic-Disney-Lucasfilm-are-heading-back-to-Kerry-to-film-part-of-Star-Wars-Episode-VIII/377968.htm

Thank you for visiting my blog.

Please also visit my website for more images of the Skelligs and Sybil Head

SPECTACULAR SUNSET, DINGLE PENINSULA.

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Last night, I happened to suddenly look up from my task on the computer and saw a spectacularly red sky. Naturally, I grabbed my camera and ran out to capture some of  this amazing event. After hurriedly capturing about 20 images – or so I thought – I discovered to my great annoyance and disappointment that I had forgotten to return the memory card to the camera, and not one image had been recorded. So, I raced back to get the card and out again to catch something before this marvellous phenomenon disappeared altogether. Of course I missed the best of it, but in spite of my rush I managed to get several images that give some flavour of the brilliance of the colour of the sky.

The location is Ballyferriter, DIngle Peninsula, County Kerry, Ireland. The rocky ridge of Sybil Head (Ceann Sibéal) is visible on the skyline.

No edits were made to the colours, just minor changes using levels.

Please visit my website http://helene-brennan.com/c25-dingle-peninsula-photos for more photos of the Dingle Peninsula

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Cruach Mharhain

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This is a modest sized mountain on the Dingle Peninsula, between Ventry and Dunquin, via the Clasach. A small but steep walk will take one to the top of this peak from the car park by the mast. It’s also a very satisfying journey, offering stunning views on the ascent and descent, and an even more rewarding vista at the top.

I always feel that this walk is best after few dry days, as the ground can be a very boggy, soggy affair. It’s also advisable to tuck your jeans well into your socks, as even this precaution doesn’t prevent the ticks from finding their way to a bit of your flesh, as I discovered. It’s a question of making it as challenging as possible for them. This is sheep country.

There is an easy path to the top, except where is gets so squelchy that one may have to deviate, carefully. This is probably where the tick risk arises, as one treads through the growth of heather.  Near the top it becomes more steep and demanding, as is often the case when walking up mountains; the top appears to be drawing near, but with each hump achieved, another looms large, until finally the real peak is conquered. I always have a good excuse for stopping to catch my breath, as I would need to take a good look around and take some photos. If the weather is good there is no point in rushing this very delightful experience; every moment should be savoured. I feel sorry for people who think they should rush to the top of every mountain; they miss so much.

Finally, the top is reached. This is really a wow experience! So many familiar landmarks of the Dingle Peninsula can be seen from this vantage point, and don’t they look spectacular from here? Sybil Head and the Three Sisters have that ‘hey! look at me’ kind of attitude, while the Blasket Islands just have ‘attitude’, Mount Eagle is quietly condescending and Mount Brandon just has it all (– when it’s not hiding under a cloud!), with Ballydavid Head, its faithful companion. It’s also possible to see across Dingle Bay to the mountains of the Iveragh Peninsula. After heartily consuming all this splendour and taking several photos -while hanging onto a fence post to brace oneself against the wind, one reluctantly starts the descent. The views towards Mount Brandon are particularly attention grabbing on the downward journey, which doesn’t seem to take long at all, even with several more photo stops.

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View of Sybil Head from the top of Cruach Mharhain

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View of Inis Tuaisceart, one of the Blasket Islands – also known locally as The Sleeping Giant, or The Dead Man.

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Mount Brandon and Ballydavid Head

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In this image one can see across Dingle Bay to the Iveragh Peninsula, also towards the left is the entrance to Dingle Harbour.

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Another view of Mount Brandon

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Dingle Bay and The Iveragh Peninsula under a beautiful sky

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Fields of many colours with Dingle Bay and the mountains of the Iveragh Peninsula

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The Three Sisters as seen from the top of Top of Cruach Mharhain

Check out my website: http://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/cruach+mharhain