PAINTINGS

Recently finished oil paintings, 70 x 50 cms. – But are they finished? I have a habit of never being satisfied and going back again and again. Some of these paintings have been on the go since last year.

The painting above was inspired by the movement of the water towards Feothanach Beach, Ballydavid, Dingle Peninsula.

Very nearby, a different view of the Three Sisters from above Dooneen Pier, with some typical Atlantic weather.

Rathinane Castle, Ventry, Dingle Peninsula.

The warm light of the setting sun on the trees in my back garden.

Thanks for visiting. More paintings of Dingle Peninsula on my website.

EVENING AT CLOGHER HEAD

 

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Evening photos on Clogher Head (in Irish – Ceann Sraithe, Sratha, Sreatha, spellings differ). I drove over there one evening to catch the warm light on this most scenic of places on the Dingle Peninsula. My collection includes several photos from this spot, but I like to keep updating, even though I may have taken better photos there on previous occasions.

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The Blasket Islands can be seen from here, looking splendid in the warm glow of the setting sun.

DSC_1007 Great Blasket Island

 

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Sybil Head (Ceann Sibéal) appears at its most majestic from this viewing point.  There is something about this headland that I find quite compelling and magnetic, that I also find very difficult to capture in photos. I will go back again – and again – to try to get that quality that eludes me. I may also tell you a little story about this headland… later.

I have already mentioned on a number of occasions that the top of this headland was a film location for a Star Wars movie a few years ago.  At that time a telescope was placed at Clogher Head so that people could look over at the activities on the film set.

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Clogher Beach, The Three Sisters and Ballydavid Head, above

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To the right of Ballydavid Head is Mount Brandon, zoomed a little closer, above.

DSC_0999 Mount Brandon from Ceann Sraithe

 

DSC_0998 Sybil Head and Clogher Beach

 

 

DSC_1002 Clogher Beach and Ferriters Cove

 

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An ancient standing stone, above and below. I would prefer not to have it exactly in the centre of the composition but the ground was so wet I couldn’t stand where I needed to. I was also in a bit of a hurry because I arrived on the scene a little too late and the sun was going down very fast.

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A slightly better composition was possible with my mobile phone, above.

 

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The sun was obviously setting behind these rocks below, as this couple appeared to be enjoying the spectacle.

DSC_1019 watching the sunset

I hope you enjoyed the evening at Clogher Head. Thanks for looking. More Dingle Peninsula photos on this link:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c25–photos-of-dingle-peninsula

A WINTER WALK

Some photos from a walk in the Mount Brandon vicinity last December. I didn’t get round to posting them earlier because I didn’t know the name of the townland – still don’t know, but I thought it worth showing these photos anyway. This path leads to one of the routes for ascending the mountain. I didnt get many photos mainly due to poor weather, but a few minutes of light gave some nice views, looking back from start of the mountain path.

Thanks so much for looking.

ANOTHER WEEK

corona times

DSC_2399 Feothanach Beach

It’s more than two weeks into Covid-19 partial shutdown, now growing into a more major shutdown. Numbers affected by the virus in ireland are growing, approximately 1500+ to date.

The only notable event for me this past week was my birthday on Tuesday. It was an unusual birthday, in a number of ways. A walk with friends (maintaining recommended physical distance of course), and a bring your own picnic was planned, but bad weather postponed the walk until today (Thursday).

It was like the first day of summer today, warm enough to sit out in a t shirt, but considerably cooler on the Feothanach cliffs, not very far from my home on the Dingle Peninsula, in the South West of Ireland, which was the chosen place for our walk.

So here are the photos from this walk on this very unusual time of social isolation / physical distancing.

DSC_2370 On Feothanach Cliffs

Above and below are the Three Sisters, and Sybil Head.

DSC_2403 On Feothanach Cliffs

 

DSC_2393 ON Feothanach Cliffs

 

DSC_2379 On Feothanach Cliffs

Mount Brandon, with a little covering of cloud, above and below.

DSC_2382 On Feothanach Cliffs

See the caves in the rocks above.

 

DSC_2427 Feothanach Beach

Trying to maintain recommended physical distance.

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Feothanach Beach above and below

DSC_2430 Feothanach Beach

 

DSC_2431 Feothanach Beach

 

DSC_2432 Feothanach Beach

 

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It’s a stunning area, a lovely walk, a really enjoyable picnic and chat on the rocks, a great day and a really good thing to do for one’s birthday.  We’re looking forward to a proper celebration when things return to normal. But you know – it would be hard to beat the above! 

STAY WELL

Back to the Beautiful Dingle Peninsula.

This is a selection of beach views . The photos shown here were taken on different days, at different times of the year. Most of them just happen to have been taken at high spring tides, but I can assure you that the beaches are very sandy at other times.

If you click on these photos individually you will see a much sharper image.

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Viewing Ballydavid Head from Béal Bán on a sunny evening with a high spring tide.

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Mount Brandon with a little cloud cover and Ballydavid Head, viewed across a high spring tide.

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On a crisp winter’s day, Mount Brandon is seen here covered in snow.

Like many other beaches in the area it has magnificent views. Mount Brandon, next to Ballydavid head, and on the other side the rear view of the three sisters, aptly frame the scene at each side of the beach.  No monotonous straight horizon line here, the picturesque forms of its beautiful geographical features provide ample relief from this possibility.

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The Three Sisters are seen to the left of the view from the beach

The water here forms particularly regular long uniform waves. Sometimes perfect for surfers, but often unchallenging for the more experienced. To the observer these virtually straight lines of surf which appear to form on top of each other can seem incongruous with one’s expectations of the Atlantic Ocean.

The breaking waves appear larger in the distance, completely contradicting one’s experience of perspective, and as they come closer to the beach, they collapse down, while the next waves breaks on top,  appearing larger and larger; becoming smaller and smaller as they drop down.

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A young couple play hurling at Couminole Beach.

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Ventry Beach

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The lovely Trá Bán (White Strand) on Great Blasket Island, also showing the ruins of deserted houses. More Blasket Island photos on: http://www.helene-brennan.com/c53-blasket-islands-photographs

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The builders have gone home after their day’s work, leaving their creations to the tide

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Creative efforts, now left for the course of nature.

Mount Brandon, the highest mountain on the Dingle Peninsula, often seen with its peak shrouded in  cloud,  is on this day shyly hiding behind a delicate transparent mantle, showing only faint,  tantalising glimpses of its lovely contours as rhythms of light sneak through the thin stretch of cloud.

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Dún an Óir. This is a truly beautiful place, and must be experienced.

This beautiful area, at Dún an Óir is overshadowed by a rather dark history. In November 1580, there was a massacre of several hundred Italian and Spanish Papal troops who landed here to aid an Irish rebellion. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Siege_of_Smerwick

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Commemorative monument at Dún an Óir

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Beach offerings. Fresh seaweed has a beauty to be appreciated.

PLEASE VISIT MY WEBSITE FOR MORE DINGLE PENINSULA PHOTOS:

http://www.helene-brennan.com/c25-dingle-peninsula-photos