EVENING AT CLOGHER HEAD

 

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Evening photos on Clogher Head (in Irish – Ceann Sraithe, Sratha, Sreatha, spellings differ). I drove over there one evening to catch the warm light on this most scenic of places on the Dingle Peninsula. My collection includes several photos from this spot, but I like to keep updating, even though I may have taken better photos there on previous occasions.

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The Blasket Islands can be seen from here, looking splendid in the warm glow of the setting sun.

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Sybil Head (Ceann Sibéal) appears at its most majestic from this viewing point.  There is something about this headland that I find quite compelling and magnetic, that I also find very difficult to capture in photos. I will go back again – and again – to try to get that quality that eludes me. I may also tell you a little story about this headland… later.

I have already mentioned on a number of occasions that the top of this headland was a film location for a Star Wars movie a few years ago.  At that time a telescope was placed at Clogher Head so that people could look over at the activities on the film set.

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Clogher Beach, The Three Sisters and Ballydavid Head, above

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To the right of Ballydavid Head is Mount Brandon, zoomed a little closer, above.

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An ancient standing stone, above and below. I would prefer not to have it exactly in the centre of the composition but the ground was so wet I couldn’t stand where I needed to. I was also in a bit of a hurry because I arrived on the scene a little too late and the sun was going down very fast.

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A slightly better composition was possible with my mobile phone, above.

 

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The sun was obviously setting behind these rocks below, as this couple appeared to be enjoying the spectacle.

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I hope you enjoyed the evening at Clogher Head. Thanks for looking. More Dingle Peninsula photos on this link:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c25–photos-of-dingle-peninsula

WILD ATLANTIC WALK

These photos were taken from Clogher Beach and the cliff walk to Cuas na nEighe from the beach. This is the place for massive, wild and wonderful waves, where many people – photographers and others go to capture the Atlantic wildness, or just to observe and enjoy it.

This rock above can send the most enormous splash way up to the sky. Photographers love to catch this moment. It always happens just when you take your eye off the ball, in a manner of speaking. I’ve seen some arrive with their tripods and camera pointed at the rock, ready for the event, and not being side-tracked by any of the lovely dancing light on the spray etc. They leave as soon as they capture it. Nothing else matters.

If you follow my posts you would have seen many other photos from this place, but as I often say, it changes every day, with the wind and the light.

Lace-like patterns swoosh towards the beach.

The island above right is Inis Tuaisceart, one of the Blasket Island group, commonly known as The Sleeping Giant, or locally known as Fear Marbh (Dead Man). It appears in many of my photos and paintings.

The Island in the distance above is another Blasket Island, the Tiaracht. It resembles the Great Skellig Rock, near the Iveragh Peninsula of South Kerry. Many people get confused with it,

I love these dancing shapes riding on top of the water, with the spray flying in the wind.

The next six images are from Cuas na nEighe, one of the most wild and wonderful places on the Dingle Peninsula, in my view.

At Cuas na nEighe, with Sybil Head in view.

These big splashes are so irresistable.

On the return towards Clogher Beach.

I hope you enjoy these coastal pics.

More Clogher Beach and Cosán na nEighe images

Thanks so much for visiting.

TRIP TO THE LOCAL

A trip to the local would normally mean to the local pub here, but with all the pubs still closed, now it’s a trip to the local beach! Much more healthy of course. This is another look at Béal Bán (White Mouth) Beach in Ballyferriter, on the Dingle Peninsula. My followers may remember several views from here in the past. I don’t like to go for a walk without my camera, so hopefully these photos are sufficiently different from previous versions.

I have a new camera for these past couple of months and I’ve recently realised that the date in the camera is in 2028! I thought I had re-set it but apparently not. Only discovered that after serious delving into why Google refused to publish a photo. They were unable to tell me why, but eventually I worked it out for myself. There are just too many photos taken now to change all the dates in, so hopefully these images don’t cause too much of a problem.

I never tire of watching the waves and capturing them.

Carraig Dubh (Black Rock) is the name of this rock – I’m told. I have been given other information, but I’ll go with the first.

It was quite a dull afternoon with glimpses of bright sunlight and dark shadows.

I find many of the normally sandy beaches here have a lot of stones on them recently, as the sand appears to have been dragged out with the storms. I hope the sand comes back with more storms. It does come and go a lot.

These birds were enjoying some quiet down time until I came along – they weren’t long moving.

Winter sea swimming has become so popular these days. They say it does wonders for your health. I’m not convinced.

Doubt if they expected waves this size!

Oops – they’re gone! They did re-appear.

Mount Brandon with a bright fluffy hat.

These cows were quietly enjoying the view over the sea.

I hope you enjoyed this trip to the local with me. These and many other photos of this beach and other local trips in the Ballyferriter area can be seen on this link:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/ballyferriter

UP ON A MOUNTAIN – SLIEVANEA

Here are some photos taken on a walk up a mountain from the car park on the Conor Pass road, on the Dingle Peninsula, South West Ireland. I have previously posted photos from this Conor Pass road. https://helenebrennan.wordpress.com/2020/02/24/conor-pass-or-main-road/ The path northwards from the road goes up the Slievanea Mountain, which has wonderful views, as, as you might expect.

I find – on my computer it takes two clicks on most of the photos to see the best, sharpest version.

Mount Brandon is the mountain in the above view.

Here in this one above one can see Dingle town, and below, across Dingle Bay to the Iveragh Peninsula (Ring of Kerry)

 

 

These corrie lakes are stunning, at any time of the year, looking a  little frozen at the moment. The grass was crunchy with frost under our feet. It was really cold, with a bitter North East wind.

 

Would you believe it – that someone was so stupid and thoughtless to walk up a mountain, behold the wonderful views, and leave a beer bottle behind!

There were quite a few other walkers about, not surpringly, being such a beautiful sunny day.

Unfortunately we ran out of path, and tried to make our way through humpy boggy ground, before abandoning the walk in case of not being able to find a safe route back. Besides, it was bitterly cold. Another Day!

 

 

The above shot was taken from the road on the way back to Dingle. It shows the Kinard area, with the sea stack The Searrach, meaning foal, in view.

The Conor Pass is the highest ashphalt mountain pass in Ireland, and one of the most scenic routes you could find.  It’s not easy to drive for the visitor who doesn’t know the road, being very narrow and winding with overhanging rocks in places.

Thanks for visiting my post. If you would like to see more Conor Pass images, there are several photos and paintings on my website. Please check out this tag on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/conor+pass

THE VILLAGE THAT WAS…

Walking up Cruach Mharhain, from Dunquin, on the Dingle Peninsula, in County Kerry. The weather was particularly dull for the most part, and many of these photos needed some help  in showing a bit of colour.

The Islands here are the Blasket Islands. The largest one, on the left, was once the home of 150 or more remarkable people, the most westerly community in Europe, until about 1953.

 

Head butting sheep!

 

A road to nowhere? Actually this was the scene of the fictitious village of Kirrary, that was built for the 1970 movie Ryan’s Daughter. A substantial village was built here, using local labour, which was a welcome source of income to local small farmers when there was very little employment or tourism in the area.  Most locals now seem sorry that the village was demolished. It was offered free to anyone who wanted it at the time, but I think there were issues around the fact that it was built on commonage. It would have been a great tourist attraction.

Just as we came over the shoulder of the mountain just beyond the village, there was this wonderful view of Sybil Head. A bright sun shone out from the dark clouds, with a strange light. Strangely enough, the top of Sybil Head was the location of a Star Wars movie set a few years ago.

The schoolhouse that was built for Ryan’s Daughter is down at the coast, falling to ruin. I have many photos taken at different stages of ruin:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/ryans+daughter+schoolhouse

Thanks so much for your visit to my post,

LEFT OF MOUNT BRANDON

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On this walk we took a path to the left of Mount Brandon, a different side of the mountain from that my previous post. We had intended to go up Brandon but due to low cloud and skeins of foggy patches coming from the sea we thought it safer to not go to the top of the mountain.  I was secretly glad of this, to be honest, because I didn’t feel fit enough for the more challenging walk we might have taken.

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The landmarks remained the same for much of the walk, but the clouds changed all the time.

 

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This is how Brandon appeared as clouds rolled by.

 

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My guess at this story is that the farmer left this old vehicle here to use as storage for his fencing materials, and it was first vandalised by human eejits, and later attacked by multiple storms.

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These two photos were taken in the same minute, and look how quickly the picture can change in this kind of weather.

 

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We accidentally deviated from our path and arrived at this cliff edge, and sat for our picnic on the grassy slopes below, where I picked up a few sheep ticks – again!  There is Lyme disease here, but one can stay at home and be safe, or go out and take chances.  At least you can’t pass Lyme disease on to anyone else, unlike Covid-19.

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So, back down on low ground, and even on the correct route, just signposted with no obvious path.

A lovely walk with great views, and the foggy clouds even added to the beauty of the scenes. I hope you enjoyed the images.

Thanks for viewing my post. Please click on this tag for different views of Mount Brandon, photos and paintings on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/mount+brandon

BRANDON POINT

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A lovely walk on the far side of the Connor Pass from Dingle, to Brandon Point on the edge of Mount Brandon, and up the hill from the car park. Beautiful views, well worth the journey, although negotiating the tourists on the pass is somewhat precarious in August.  Parts of this road are very narrow and winding, with overhanging rocks, and a steep drop on one side.

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With the Connor Pass well behind, this is Cloghane Estuary

 

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View from the car park at Brandon Point.

 

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…and walking up the hill, looking at the views.

 

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One of 83 wartime (WW2) lookout posts around the coast of Ireland.

 

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Jasmine and friends, a lovely bunch of people relaxing at the top of the hill beside the cairn.  You can sometimes meet the nicest people at the top of mountains!

 

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Brandon Beach

 

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On the journey back to the pass.

 

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Home safe and sound after this enjoyable little bit of a hill walk. So nice to see the scenery at the other side of Brandon Mountain.

Next I have some photos to show of yet another side of Mount Brandon.  Here is a preview:

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Thank you for your visit to my post, I hope you will join me again for my next post, coming soon.

Dingle Peninsula photos on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c25–photos-of-dingle-peninsula

MOODY HUES

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Some recent photos from my local beach Béal Bán, Ballyferriter, on the Dingle Peninsula, South West Ireland. It was one of those moody days, when the light quality could change in an eye-blink. Just a normal day here really.

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I guessed that the tartan slippers belonged to the occupant of a camper parked here. They created an unlikely and incongruous image by the beach.

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Thanks for visiting my post, I hope you enjoyed  this beach walk.  Please visit my website for more Dingle Peninsula photos, with images of several other lovely beaches in this area.

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c25–photos-of-dingle-peninsula

KILLARNEY NATIONAL PARK (Part 2)

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Continuing our drive through Killarney National Park, following on from my previous post, we three masked women in my van leave behind Muckross Park and Torc Waterfall and we pass Ladies View – the famous and popular viewing place for Killarney’s beautiful lakes. We had to pass it by because there were so many tourists there that it seemed impossible to get a parking spot. However, we stopped at several places not far beyond that, and here are the photos:

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Lily pads on the lake.

 

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In the Black Valley region.

 

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Finally we drove through the famous Gap of Dunloe.  By this time the weather turned very dark and dim and I had to employ a little help from my image editing app to inject a little life into these photos.

 

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Here are some of the jaunting cars that can be hired to tour this area, all fitted with pooh bags, since there were strong objections from many people regarding the amount of horse dung on the pathways of the Killarney National Park.  After some resistance, the jarveys (jaunting car drivers) complied with the new rule imposed by the Office of Public Works.

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We certainly enjoyed our trip through Killarney National Park, and I hope you enjoyed the trip with us also.

In case you missed Part 1 of this post, click here

There are more photos of this area on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c87-photographs-of-the-iveragh-peninsula-and-killarney

Thanks for looking. Stay safe!

 

 

 

 

 

ONE OF THOSE SUNSETS

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This one crept up on me, as they often do. I was just settling down to watch one of my favourite TV shows when I glanced out the window and saw these brillant colours in the sky. I nearly didn’t bother, but I decided to go for it, grabbed the camera and ran out and just managed to get a few shots before the colours faded.

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These bare branches make it look quite wintry. We’ve had some very windy days this summer, following on from a particularly stormy winter. Some of the trees in this area haven’t had a chance to grow or hold onto many leaves.

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Thanks for looking. Stay safe!