BALLYDAVID COASTAL VIEWS

These photos were taken on different days and at different sections of the coast of the Ballydavid region of the Dingle Peninsula, County Kerry, on the South West of Ireland.

You may already be familiar with the Three Sisters, which can be seen from many parts of this peninsula. They rise up majestically from the side you can see here, but drop down dramatically on the western coast.

Many visitors to the area never get round to seeing this part of the Dingle Peninsula. By the time they’ve done the Slea Head Drive, and in many case taken the short cut back to Dingle town accidentally, they don’t get a chance to walk the cliffs of Ballydavid.

I really enjoy seeing the rocky coastline here.

A chough poses on top of this WW2 lookout post. Not that you can tell that it’s a chough from this photo, but I was watching two of them flying about the area.

It’s hard to resist taking a few shots of the lambs in the field along here. Unfortunately this little one below got loose from the field and couldn’t find a way back in. It refused to be helped, being too scared and timid!

Fishing.

There was a beautiful sky with amazing clouds when I took some of these photos, but unfortunately I only had my mobile phone on that occasion, and was in a bit of a rush. I feel I could have done it more justice with my better camera and more care.

I got carried away trying to get a good image of these cormorants, using my full zoom, as this rock was some distance away. I was pleased the fishing boat turned up – it added a little extra interest to the shot.

More images from the Ballydavid area can be seen on my website here

Thanks for viewing my post. Your visit is always most appreciated. I hope you have all managed to stay well during the past difficult eighteen months.

MIZORAM, SOLOMON’S TEMPLE

I need to explain that I published this post last year, and then with an accidental flick of the finger on the phone screen (August 2021), I put it into drafts. I then had to press the publish button to place it back into published. So that’s why it’s out of context and time!

So here is the original post:

Back to Mizoram again in this post, with still so many photos to show after my December 2019/ January 2020 trip.

There are church buildings all over the place in Aizawl, the capital of Mizoram, a state in North East India (which is 87% Christian), and very large impressive buildings they are too, but Solomon’s Temple is considered a ‘must see’ for tourists. It’s a huge building with a seating capacity of 3000 inside, and a lot more could be seated in the porch or canopied area all around the exterior of the building.

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The architect and leader of the Church Dr LB Sailo, claims that God showed him the design in a dream, so he set about attempting to get this church constructed. It took more than 20 years to build, and it was built largely on voluntary labour. I found that the name of the religion was hard to grasp, as I was given different answers when I enquired about it. ‘A cult’, ‘Born again Christian’ ‘Kohhran Thianghlim’ (meaning Holy Church) were some answers. Whatever, it is, it is the largest Church building in Aizawl. I don’t know how full it might be on a Sunday. It’s open to tourists with a caretaker there to show you around.

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The walls of the building are covered in white busleara marble, and the floor is of red sandstone. The winter afternoon sun gives the walls a warm tint in some of these photos.

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Mizo Church goers do seem to enjoy their singing and this is generally accompanied by enthusiastic drumming.

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The building inside is just one open space. The ceiling is highly polished which enables the light from the windows to be reflected, giving extra light in the building.

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Notice the Star of David, generously applied as ornamentation around the building. They named this building after the original Solomon’s Temple in Jerusalem, (currently the site of the Al Aqsa Mosque) and see it as some kind of replacement for the First Temple.

Just for a little balance, I have included a few photos of other church buildings I happened to see as I walked around. I haven’t got the names of all of them

I would just like to say that I am not at all religious and have no religious beliefs whatsoever. I’m just an observer.

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Chaltlang Presbyterian Church, above and below (with Christmas lights).

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A Christmas tree street decoration below, outside a church building.

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Thanks for visiting my post. I might return again to Mizoram in another post.

I can be contacted via my website.

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c51-india

LAST MOMENTS OF DAYLIGHT

Following on from my last post I am now showing the last photos from my walk on Cosán na nÉighe to Cuas na nÉighe, on the Dingle Peninsula, West County Kerry, in the South West of Ireland, as the sun was setting and daylight went to sleep.

Above is Sybil Head, (Ceann Sibéal), viewed from Cuas na nÉighe, a place which I find one of the most magical and magnetic in the area. Often the sea is as rough as hell here, and so exhilarating to behold. But on this occasion it was calm and peaceful, on a warm and balmy summer’s evening.

There are two blow holes here, which I don’t dare to go near, though I would love to look down at the water I can hear swooshing down below.

The soft evening sun cast a lovely light on the rocks.

The Three Sisters and Ballydavid head are seen in the two photos above. Below is Mount Brandon.

There is a charming little boulder beach at this place.

While walking around this area taking photos, I came upon two women who were camping here. We got talking and I discovered they came from my own neck of the woods in the east of the country, one from my home town and the other from near my mothers place.

They kindly offered me some tea and shared their m&ms with me, while we sat and watched the sunset, and snapping all the while! A very memorable end to the day.

Aahh, there it goes – until tomorrow.

I had to rush back to Clogher Beach where my van was parked, before it became too dark. No street lights here!

The two islands are the Tiaracht and the Sleeping Giant (Inis Tuaisceart), of the Blasket Islands group.

As the light dimmed the sheep seemed to gather together.

And so concludes this one of many walks on this route. I’m sure I will go again, many more times.

For more images of the Clogher area (photos and paintings) please check this link

Thanks for viewing my post. I hope you have enjoyed it and that you will join me again.

SUMMER’S EVENING PHOTOS

Here are some more photos taken one evening recently on one of my local beaches, Béal Bán (White Mount). I have shown many pics from there in previous posts, and as I always say, each day it looks different, as the light changes so much. I have to admit that I was feeling a little challenged to get some images that looked sufficiently different from previous efforts, but I think I succeeded; I hope you will agree.

It’s wonderful to have the long days. These captures were taken between 8.00 pm and 9.00 pm. It’s so nice to be able to walk on the beaches in the sunny evenings – if the sun shines, of course.

I zoomed across the bay to get close ups of the mountains. Below you can see Mount Brandon and the village of Ballydavid and it’s small beach and harbour.

There is a rocky area at the end of this lovely sandy beach. The low tide exposed more rocks than you might sometimes see.

As the tide was very low, the sand had these wavy, groovy patterns, which is often fodder for photographic images.

I was delighted to come across this sand castle, evidence of much fun and imagination by some child or children on the beach earlier.

I appreciate your visit. It would also be so nice if you would check out my Dingle Peninsula photos on my website. Thank you so much.

EVENING AT CLOGHER HEAD

 

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Evening photos on Clogher Head (in Irish – Ceann Sraithe, Sratha, Sreatha, spellings differ). I drove over there one evening to catch the warm light on this most scenic of places on the Dingle Peninsula. My collection includes several photos from this spot, but I like to keep updating, even though I may have taken better photos there on previous occasions.

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The Blasket Islands can be seen from here, looking splendid in the warm glow of the setting sun.

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Sybil Head (Ceann Sibéal) appears at its most majestic from this viewing point.  There is something about this headland that I find quite compelling and magnetic, that I also find very difficult to capture in photos. I will go back again – and again – to try to get that quality that eludes me. I may also tell you a little story about this headland… later.

I have already mentioned on a number of occasions that the top of this headland was a film location for a Star Wars movie a few years ago.  At that time a telescope was placed at Clogher Head so that people could look over at the activities on the film set.

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Clogher Beach, The Three Sisters and Ballydavid Head, above

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To the right of Ballydavid Head is Mount Brandon, zoomed a little closer, above.

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An ancient standing stone, above and below. I would prefer not to have it exactly in the centre of the composition but the ground was so wet I couldn’t stand where I needed to. I was also in a bit of a hurry because I arrived on the scene a little too late and the sun was going down very fast.

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A slightly better composition was possible with my mobile phone, above.

 

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The sun was obviously setting behind these rocks below, as this couple appeared to be enjoying the spectacle.

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I hope you enjoyed the evening at Clogher Head. Thanks for looking. More Dingle Peninsula photos on this link:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c25–photos-of-dingle-peninsula

WILD ATLANTIC WALK

These photos were taken from Clogher Beach and the cliff walk to Cuas na nEighe from the beach. This is the place for massive, wild and wonderful waves, where many people – photographers and others go to capture the Atlantic wildness, or just to observe and enjoy it.

This rock above can send the most enormous splash way up to the sky. Photographers love to catch this moment. It always happens just when you take your eye off the ball, in a manner of speaking. I’ve seen some arrive with their tripods and camera pointed at the rock, ready for the event, and not being side-tracked by any of the lovely dancing light on the spray etc. They leave as soon as they capture it. Nothing else matters.

If you follow my posts you would have seen many other photos from this place, but as I often say, it changes every day, with the wind and the light.

Lace-like patterns swoosh towards the beach.

The island above right is Inis Tuaisceart, one of the Blasket Island group, commonly known as The Sleeping Giant, or locally known as Fear Marbh (Dead Man). It appears in many of my photos and paintings.

The Island in the distance above is another Blasket Island, the Tiaracht. It resembles the Great Skellig Rock, near the Iveragh Peninsula of South Kerry. Many people get confused with it,

I love these dancing shapes riding on top of the water, with the spray flying in the wind.

The next six images are from Cuas na nEighe, one of the most wild and wonderful places on the Dingle Peninsula, in my view.

At Cuas na nEighe, with Sybil Head in view.

These big splashes are so irresistable.

On the return towards Clogher Beach.

I hope you enjoy these coastal pics.

More Clogher Beach and Cosán na nEighe images

Thanks so much for visiting.

TRIP TO THE LOCAL

A trip to the local would normally mean to the local pub here, but with all the pubs still closed, now it’s a trip to the local beach! Much more healthy of course. This is another look at Béal Bán (White Mouth) Beach in Ballyferriter, on the Dingle Peninsula. My followers may remember several views from here in the past. I don’t like to go for a walk without my camera, so hopefully these photos are sufficiently different from previous versions.

I have a new camera for these past couple of months and I’ve recently realised that the date in the camera is in 2028! I thought I had re-set it but apparently not. Only discovered that after serious delving into why Google refused to publish a photo. They were unable to tell me why, but eventually I worked it out for myself. There are just too many photos taken now to change all the dates in, so hopefully these images don’t cause too much of a problem.

I never tire of watching the waves and capturing them.

Carraig Dubh (Black Rock) is the name of this rock – I’m told. I have been given other information, but I’ll go with the first.

It was quite a dull afternoon with glimpses of bright sunlight and dark shadows.

I find many of the normally sandy beaches here have a lot of stones on them recently, as the sand appears to have been dragged out with the storms. I hope the sand comes back with more storms. It does come and go a lot.

These birds were enjoying some quiet down time until I came along – they weren’t long moving.

Winter sea swimming has become so popular these days. They say it does wonders for your health. I’m not convinced.

Doubt if they expected waves this size!

Oops – they’re gone! They did re-appear.

Mount Brandon with a bright fluffy hat.

These cows were quietly enjoying the view over the sea.

I hope you enjoyed this trip to the local with me. These and many other photos of this beach and other local trips in the Ballyferriter area can be seen on this link:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/ballyferriter

UP ON A MOUNTAIN – SLIEVANEA

Here are some photos taken on a walk up a mountain from the car park on the Conor Pass road, on the Dingle Peninsula, South West Ireland. I have previously posted photos from this Conor Pass road. https://helenebrennan.wordpress.com/2020/02/24/conor-pass-or-main-road/ The path northwards from the road goes up the Slievanea Mountain, which has wonderful views, as, as you might expect.

I find – on my computer it takes two clicks on most of the photos to see the best, sharpest version.

Mount Brandon is the mountain in the above view.

Here in this one above one can see Dingle town, and below, across Dingle Bay to the Iveragh Peninsula (Ring of Kerry)

 

 

These corrie lakes are stunning, at any time of the year, looking a  little frozen at the moment. The grass was crunchy with frost under our feet. It was really cold, with a bitter North East wind.

 

Would you believe it – that someone was so stupid and thoughtless to walk up a mountain, behold the wonderful views, and leave a beer bottle behind!

There were quite a few other walkers about, not surpringly, being such a beautiful sunny day.

Unfortunately we ran out of path, and tried to make our way through humpy boggy ground, before abandoning the walk in case of not being able to find a safe route back. Besides, it was bitterly cold. Another Day!

 

 

The above shot was taken from the road on the way back to Dingle. It shows the Kinard area, with the sea stack The Searrach, meaning foal, in view.

The Conor Pass is the highest ashphalt mountain pass in Ireland, and one of the most scenic routes you could find.  It’s not easy to drive for the visitor who doesn’t know the road, being very narrow and winding with overhanging rocks in places.

Thanks for visiting my post. If you would like to see more Conor Pass images, there are several photos and paintings on my website. Please check out this tag on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/conor+pass

THE VILLAGE THAT WAS…

Walking up Cruach Mharhain, from Dunquin, on the Dingle Peninsula, in County Kerry. The weather was particularly dull for the most part, and many of these photos needed some help  in showing a bit of colour.

The Islands here are the Blasket Islands. The largest one, on the left, was once the home of 150 or more remarkable people, the most westerly community in Europe, until about 1953.

 

Head butting sheep!

 

A road to nowhere? Actually this was the scene of the fictitious village of Kirrary, that was built for the 1970 movie Ryan’s Daughter. A substantial village was built here, using local labour, which was a welcome source of income to local small farmers when there was very little employment or tourism in the area.  Most locals now seem sorry that the village was demolished. It was offered free to anyone who wanted it at the time, but I think there were issues around the fact that it was built on commonage. It would have been a great tourist attraction.

Just as we came over the shoulder of the mountain just beyond the village, there was this wonderful view of Sybil Head. A bright sun shone out from the dark clouds, with a strange light. Strangely enough, the top of Sybil Head was the location of a Star Wars movie set a few years ago.

The schoolhouse that was built for Ryan’s Daughter is down at the coast, falling to ruin. I have many photos taken at different stages of ruin:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/ryans+daughter+schoolhouse

Thanks so much for your visit to my post,

LEFT OF MOUNT BRANDON

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On this walk we took a path to the left of Mount Brandon, a different side of the mountain from that my previous post. We had intended to go up Brandon but due to low cloud and skeins of foggy patches coming from the sea we thought it safer to not go to the top of the mountain.  I was secretly glad of this, to be honest, because I didn’t feel fit enough for the more challenging walk we might have taken.

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The landmarks remained the same for much of the walk, but the clouds changed all the time.

 

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This is how Brandon appeared as clouds rolled by.

 

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My guess at this story is that the farmer left this old vehicle here to use as storage for his fencing materials, and it was first vandalised by human eejits, and later attacked by multiple storms.

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These two photos were taken in the same minute, and look how quickly the picture can change in this kind of weather.

 

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We accidentally deviated from our path and arrived at this cliff edge, and sat for our picnic on the grassy slopes below, where I picked up a few sheep ticks – again!  There is Lyme disease here, but one can stay at home and be safe, or go out and take chances.  At least you can’t pass Lyme disease on to anyone else, unlike Covid-19.

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So, back down on low ground, and even on the correct route, just signposted with no obvious path.

A lovely walk with great views, and the foggy clouds even added to the beauty of the scenes. I hope you enjoyed the images.

Thanks for viewing my post. Please click on this tag for different views of Mount Brandon, photos and paintings on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/mount+brandon