LEFT OF MOUNT BRANDON

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On this walk we took a path to the left of Mount Brandon, a different side of the mountain from that my previous post. We had intended to go up Brandon but due to low cloud and skeins of foggy patches coming from the sea we thought it safer to not go to the top of the mountain.  I was secretly glad of this, to be honest, because I didn’t feel fit enough for the more challenging walk we might have taken.

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The landmarks remained the same for much of the walk, but the clouds changed all the time.

 

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This is how Brandon appeared as clouds rolled by.

 

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My guess at this story is that the farmer left this old vehicle here to use as storage for his fencing materials, and it was first vandalised by human eejits, and later attacked by multiple storms.

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These two photos were taken in the same minute, and look how quickly the picture can change in this kind of weather.

 

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We accidentally deviated from our path and arrived at this cliff edge, and sat for our picnic on the grassy slopes below, where I picked up a few sheep ticks – again!  There is Lyme disease here, but one can stay at home and be safe, or go out and take chances.  At least you can’t pass Lyme disease on to anyone else, unlike Covid-19.

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So, back down on low ground, and even on the correct route, just signposted with no obvious path.

A lovely walk with great views, and the foggy clouds even added to the beauty of the scenes. I hope you enjoyed the images.

Thanks for viewing my post. Please click on this tag for different views of Mount Brandon, photos and paintings on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/mount+brandon

BRANDON POINT

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A lovely walk on the far side of the Connor Pass from Dingle, to Brandon Point on the edge of Mount Brandon, and up the hill from the car park. Beautiful views, well worth the journey, although negotiating the tourists on the pass is somewhat precarious in August.  Parts of this road are very narrow and winding, with overhanging rocks, and a steep drop on one side.

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With the Connor Pass well behind, this is Cloghane Estuary

 

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View from the car park at Brandon Point.

 

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…and walking up the hill, looking at the views.

 

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One of 83 wartime (WW2) lookout posts around the coast of Ireland.

 

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Jasmine and friends, a lovely bunch of people relaxing at the top of the hill beside the cairn.  You can sometimes meet the nicest people at the top of mountains!

 

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Brandon Beach

 

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On the journey back to the pass.

 

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Home safe and sound after this enjoyable little bit of a hill walk. So nice to see the scenery at the other side of Brandon Mountain.

Next I have some photos to show of yet another side of Mount Brandon.  Here is a preview:

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Thank you for your visit to my post, I hope you will join me again for my next post, coming soon.

Dingle Peninsula photos on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c25–photos-of-dingle-peninsula

WAY BACK WHEN……….in Morocco

I actually prepared this post about a year ago, and I really thought I had posted it. But I have just discovered it in draft form now, so finally here it is:

Recently I was looking through some old pre-digital photos, I was concerned to see how they were deteriorating, particularly those which I kept in those typical photo albums with a cellophane type of covering over the photos. So I set about trying to scan these prints – or at least most of them.  I had previously used a gadget for scanning the negatives but found it fiddly and it produced distorted colours, and scanning several prints at a time on my A3 scanner was so much quicker.

After scanning I then made some necessary restoration to the colours and intensity of the images. Of course they don’t compare well with the quality of photos made with modern digital cameras, many are a bit grainy or noisy, but in a way I quite like the aged appearance of them and I feel they are relevant in terms of representing a place in time, and important to preserve them before they are beyond redemption.

Starting with Morocco…

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In 1988 I made a trip to Morocco where I trekked with a group in the High Atlas Mountains, the high point of which was an ascent of Mount Toubkal. At 4,000 Meters I believe it is the highest mountain in North Africa. Not high compared with other more famous mountains, but fairly challenging.

The trek took us through many small Berber villages, the names of which are largely forgotten now. The friendly Berber people there were were mostly living in quite modest and poor conditions at that time, and tourism was really only just developing in the area. We overnighted in basic conditions in some of these villages although in one or two places we didn’t even have access to any sort of a toilet, and finding a private place for the necessary personal daily deeds was subject to being followed by local people – mostly women and children who were clearly highly amused!

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A Berber village on the mountainside, typically coming down in steps, and with its terraced farmland below.

 

Berber Villages in the Hight Atlas Mountains

 

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The main problem with looking back at these images is that I have forgotten the names of the villages, I may insert some more information if I can later.

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I believe the village above is called Ouanesekra

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Ascending Mount Toubkal. Large areas were quite snowy.

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From summit of Mount Toubkal, above.

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At the summit of Mount Toubkal. As I am in the photo, I obviously didn’t take it, and I really can’t remember who did, but I’m sure they won’t mind me showing it.

More of my photos of Morocco can be seen on my website:

http://www.helene-brennan.com/c38-photos-of-morocco

Also several paintings of Morocco on my website:

http://www.helene-brennan.com/c37-paintings-of-morocco

Thank you for visiting.