GOODBYE THRIFT, HELLO CHAMOMILE

I set out to take some photos in the late evening sun, as I have done many times before. Not really sure where I would go to get something different from the previous hundreds – or thousands of shots I’ve taken in this area of the Dingle Peninsula where I live, I drove my van along the road until I came to Clogher Beach. It was a beautiful, sunny and calm evening and I liked the look of Clogher as I approached, so I parked up there.

I set out on the cliff walk from the beach to Cuas na nEighe. Some of you may recognise the place from my previous posts. I hoped to get some different images.

goodbye thrift refers to the sea pinks, also called thrifts. In previous posts I have shown the amazing swathes and clumps of these gorgeous pink flowers that festoon the cliffs in this area. Now they have turned brown and finished flowering for this year. Gone, but not forever. The thrill has definitely not gone, now that instead of thrift there are wonderful chamomile blossoms proliferating all along the cliff tops.

The Island of Inis Tuaisceart (The Sleeping Giant) is above.

The Tiaracht is the Island above.

As you can see, the thrift is still there in profusion, but not much pink there now, it’s mostly brown, but still quite attractive with the sunlight catching the tips of them.

Now I have Sybil Head (Ceann Sibéal) in view, above.

It was the way the low evening sunlight caught the tops of the flowers and grasses that caught my interest that evening. Even the way the dock seed heads above were illuminated, seemed really beautiful to me.

A closer look at the Sleeping Giant, above.

A sheep posed obligingly, in front of Sybil Head.

Well I seem to have such a lot of images to show – far too many for one post. I’ve decided to leave the others which include the sunset from this walk for my next post.

Thank you so much for visiting my blog. There are many images – photos and paintings from the Clogher area on my website. It would be great if you would check it out!

SUMMER’S EVENING PHOTOS

Here are some more photos taken one evening recently on one of my local beaches, Béal Bán (White Mount). I have shown many pics from there in previous posts, and as I always say, each day it looks different, as the light changes so much. I have to admit that I was feeling a little challenged to get some images that looked sufficiently different from previous efforts, but I think I succeeded; I hope you will agree.

It’s wonderful to have the long days. These captures were taken between 8.00 pm and 9.00 pm. It’s so nice to be able to walk on the beaches in the sunny evenings – if the sun shines, of course.

I zoomed across the bay to get close ups of the mountains. Below you can see Mount Brandon and the village of Ballydavid and it’s small beach and harbour.

There is a rocky area at the end of this lovely sandy beach. The low tide exposed more rocks than you might sometimes see.

As the tide was very low, the sand had these wavy, groovy patterns, which is often fodder for photographic images.

I was delighted to come across this sand castle, evidence of much fun and imagination by some child or children on the beach earlier.

I appreciate your visit. It would also be so nice if you would check out my Dingle Peninsula photos on my website. Thank you so much.

SUNSET ON THE LONGEST DAY 2021

In Ballyferriter, on the Dingle Peninsula, in the South West of Ireland.

To celebrate the end of the longest day, I went into the field next to my garden to get a good look at the setting sun. It was not the most brilliantly colourful sunset, but it was good to see the sun, rather than a bank of clouds, which might have been the case!

The sun was dropping down behind the Three Sisters, which appear in many of my photos.

To maximise the colour I zoomed in close to the sunset.

Aahh – goodnight sun!

I turned around and saw the moon, thought I might as well take a shot.

Thanks for looking. Happy solstice!

WILD ATLANTIC CLIFF WALK

Just a few photos from a cliff walk left of Clogher Beach (left when facing the sea), on the Dingle Peninsula in the South West of Ireland. I didn’t have my good camera with me, so these are taken with my phone camera mostly just snapped in a hurry. I really hope to go back to this place again soon and take my time with my photos.

There was a lovely shimmer on the water and the colour of the sea was so breathtaking! White foamy trails streamed around the coast.

The sea pinks are looking really splendid at this time of the year.

The path above looks easy going enough, but not all of it was like this. Some parts were very hazardous, and a little slip or trip up could result in a nasty fall down a rock face. It was a little scary and challenging for my rather mature knees and less than perfect balance! The path has been eroded by storms a number of times, falling into the sea, but another path would be created and it would be walkable again for a while.

The views are really beautiful. At the top of this photo you can see Sybil Head, The Three Sisters and Ballydavid Head. That’s Clogher Beach on the right. It was an amazing walk.

There was a lot of these tiny pink wild flowers, which I haven’t yet identified.

It was a round trip involving a road walk which led back to the beach. I didn’t take photos on the road trip.

There are many more images of the Clogher area on my website, paintings and photos.

I hope you enjoyed this little walk. Thanks so much for your visit.

EVENING AT CLOGHER HEAD 2

Since my recent post, Evening at Clogher Head, I returned again to try and get some more photos before the light faded, and I also hoped to get a decent sunset.

Looking over towards Dunmore Head, above.

The sun was casting a weak pink light over the landscape

This is one of my favourite places on the peninsula, with wonderful vistas.

Hoping for a good sunset is like hoping to win the lottery! This was not the best one I’ve seen, but at least the sun wasn’t covered in thick cloud, as it often is here.

The Sleeping Giant, lies peacefully in the warm light of the disappearing sun.

I zoomed in close to get this one above, creating the illusion that the whole sky was ablaze with colour – which it wasn’t really.

I enjoy creating images in the evening light. There are several more from diffferent places – even different countries, to be seen on this tag:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/evening+light

Thanks for visiting. Good health to all.

EVENING AT CLOGHER HEAD

 

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Evening photos on Clogher Head (in Irish – Ceann Sraithe, Sratha, Sreatha, spellings differ). I drove over there one evening to catch the warm light on this most scenic of places on the Dingle Peninsula. My collection includes several photos from this spot, but I like to keep updating, even though I may have taken better photos there on previous occasions.

DSC_1014 Sleeping Giant

The Blasket Islands can be seen from here, looking splendid in the warm glow of the setting sun.

DSC_1007 Great Blasket Island

 

Blasket Islands from Ceann Sraithe_184019

 

DSC_1001 sybil head

Sybil Head (Ceann Sibéal) appears at its most majestic from this viewing point.  There is something about this headland that I find quite compelling and magnetic, that I also find very difficult to capture in photos. I will go back again – and again – to try to get that quality that eludes me. I may also tell you a little story about this headland… later.

I have already mentioned on a number of occasions that the top of this headland was a film location for a Star Wars movie a few years ago.  At that time a telescope was placed at Clogher Head so that people could look over at the activities on the film set.

DSC_1003 clogher beach and three sisters

Clogher Beach, The Three Sisters and Ballydavid Head, above

DSC_1006 mount brandon

To the right of Ballydavid Head is Mount Brandon, zoomed a little closer, above.

DSC_0999 Mount Brandon from Ceann Sraithe

 

DSC_0998 Sybil Head and Clogher Beach

 

 

DSC_1002 Clogher Beach and Ferriters Cove

 

DSC_1016 standing stone-clogher head

An ancient standing stone, above and below. I would prefer not to have it exactly in the centre of the composition but the ground was so wet I couldn’t stand where I needed to. I was also in a bit of a hurry because I arrived on the scene a little too late and the sun was going down very fast.

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A slightly better composition was possible with my mobile phone, above.

 

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The sun was obviously setting behind these rocks below, as this couple appeared to be enjoying the spectacle.

DSC_1019 watching the sunset

I hope you enjoyed the evening at Clogher Head. Thanks for looking. More Dingle Peninsula photos on this link:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/c25–photos-of-dingle-peninsula

WILD ATLANTIC WALK

These photos were taken from Clogher Beach and the cliff walk to Cuas na nEighe from the beach. This is the place for massive, wild and wonderful waves, where many people – photographers and others go to capture the Atlantic wildness, or just to observe and enjoy it.

This rock above can send the most enormous splash way up to the sky. Photographers love to catch this moment. It always happens just when you take your eye off the ball, in a manner of speaking. I’ve seen some arrive with their tripods and camera pointed at the rock, ready for the event, and not being side-tracked by any of the lovely dancing light on the spray etc. They leave as soon as they capture it. Nothing else matters.

If you follow my posts you would have seen many other photos from this place, but as I often say, it changes every day, with the wind and the light.

Lace-like patterns swoosh towards the beach.

The island above right is Inis Tuaisceart, one of the Blasket Island group, commonly known as The Sleeping Giant, or locally known as Fear Marbh (Dead Man). It appears in many of my photos and paintings.

The Island in the distance above is another Blasket Island, the Tiaracht. It resembles the Great Skellig Rock, near the Iveragh Peninsula of South Kerry. Many people get confused with it,

I love these dancing shapes riding on top of the water, with the spray flying in the wind.

The next six images are from Cuas na nEighe, one of the most wild and wonderful places on the Dingle Peninsula, in my view.

At Cuas na nEighe, with Sybil Head in view.

These big splashes are so irresistable.

On the return towards Clogher Beach.

I hope you enjoy these coastal pics.

More Clogher Beach and Cosán na nEighe images

Thanks so much for visiting.

TRIP TO THE LOCAL

A trip to the local would normally mean to the local pub here, but with all the pubs still closed, now it’s a trip to the local beach! Much more healthy of course. This is another look at Béal Bán (White Mouth) Beach in Ballyferriter, on the Dingle Peninsula. My followers may remember several views from here in the past. I don’t like to go for a walk without my camera, so hopefully these photos are sufficiently different from previous versions.

I have a new camera for these past couple of months and I’ve recently realised that the date in the camera is in 2028! I thought I had re-set it but apparently not. Only discovered that after serious delving into why Google refused to publish a photo. They were unable to tell me why, but eventually I worked it out for myself. There are just too many photos taken now to change all the dates in, so hopefully these images don’t cause too much of a problem.

I never tire of watching the waves and capturing them.

Carraig Dubh (Black Rock) is the name of this rock – I’m told. I have been given other information, but I’ll go with the first.

It was quite a dull afternoon with glimpses of bright sunlight and dark shadows.

I find many of the normally sandy beaches here have a lot of stones on them recently, as the sand appears to have been dragged out with the storms. I hope the sand comes back with more storms. It does come and go a lot.

These birds were enjoying some quiet down time until I came along – they weren’t long moving.

Winter sea swimming has become so popular these days. They say it does wonders for your health. I’m not convinced.

Doubt if they expected waves this size!

Oops – they’re gone! They did re-appear.

Mount Brandon with a bright fluffy hat.

These cows were quietly enjoying the view over the sea.

I hope you enjoyed this trip to the local with me. These and many other photos of this beach and other local trips in the Ballyferriter area can be seen on this link:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/ballyferriter

MOUNT EAGLE – TO THE TOP

Although I often take a short walk up Mount Eagle, for a little cardiovascular workout, it was some time since my last walk to the top. It can be very wet and waterlogged in winter time. But recently on a beautiful sunny Sunday I finally managed to get to the top again. I particularly wanted to get some new photos of the views from the top.

I was a little disappointed with the quality of the light, considering it started off very sunny and clear, but the views were starting to look a little dull and with a slight haze. I was aware that I have many better photos than these views of the Blasket Islands.

Great Blasket Island is the largest of this island group, is not only of interest because of its wild life and scenic beauty, but is also famous for the many acclaimed writers who emerged from the vibrant community of people who once lived there (until 1953) . Their written accounts of life on the island are now considered to be classics of literature, and there are translations of these books in many countries of the world.

As the path wound around to reveal the views at the other side of the mountain I was dismayed to see the reason for the lack of light – gorse fires! They were all over the place, with thick smoke hanging about all over the landscape. This didn’t bode well for views from the top. It was February 28th, the last legal date this year for farmers to burn the gorse, and being a dry sunny day – they went mad at it.

In this view showing Mount Brandon in the distance, I had to work at editing some detail into the picture.

Mount Eagle Lough, is the lake seen here. There is a path up the mountain from the lake which I have taken previously, but this was not the path taken on this occasion.

Finally, at the top, with very hazy views of the Blasket Islands, and the Skellig Rocks not visible through the veil of smoke.

I did what I could with the available views before setting off down again.

On the way down the sun had moved over the islands, giving some pleasing images.

The following photos were taken on previous trips, some of which had better visibility.

These two older images are of the Skellig Rocks, from the top of Mount Eagle, which, because of smoke, could not be seen on my recent walk. They are closer to the next Peninsula, the Iveragh Peninsula of South Kerry. The large rock on the right is Skellig Michael, on which there is an ancient monastic settlement, with several beehive shaped stone huts, built by the monks who lived there in harsh isolation from about the 6th century AD, to about the 13th century. It is now a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and very popular with tourists – even more so since being used as a Star Wars film location. There is some information on this link below:

https://aleteia.org/2017/12/13/luke-skywalkers-beehive-huts-and-their-spiritual-symbolism/

Below is a clearer view of the Blasket Islands from the top.

Gorse fires on an earler occasion, when strong winds prevented the smoke from settling low. The fire services are regularly called out to control these fires.

How different things can look when the light is good!

Mount Eagle is 516 meters high – a very enjoyable walk on a nice day, if the path is not too soggy or flooded. Good boots are essential.

Thanks for visiting. Do come back, please.

I have several more photos taken from Mount Eagle, in different light, at different times of the year, on my website:

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/mount+eagle

TRÁBEG, KINARD, KERRY

These photos are from Trábeg Strand, a small and often dramatic wild beach in the Kinard West area on the south side of the Dingle Peninsula.

It’s pot luck whether you get any sunshine when you go out for a walk here, and after a promising start to the morning, the sky clouded over before getting there.😕

This is also one of those wild places to which photographers are drawn for those really turbulent sea images. This was not the best day for that, with the swells of last night’s gales already dying down.

Not to be deterred, I thought, I’m here now so I’ll make the best of it. I lived close to this beach many years ago, before digital photography. I haven’t been back many times since. (Wonder where all those 35mm prints are now!) 

This is the entrance to the beach. – Very stoney at the moment. In my previous life here I observed the sand come in and go out frequently with the storms. Now it appears more stoney than ever. I was also very surprised how high the water level was, considering it was only an hour away from low tide. I expected to be able to walk around the rocks to different sections of the beach at this time, but not so. A low spring tide should be ok – next time!

 

This large stack here is a very familiar landmark, which can be seen from many high places, particularly the Conor Pass road, shown below, on another day.

The sea stack is called The Searrach (Siorrach), there are often alternative name variations and spellings here. The Searrach means foal.

Every photographer who comes here wants to get a good big splash on the Searrach. I just have to be content with the stack and no big splash pictures. The water, though rough, just wasn’t quite wild enough.  Must find those old prints!

 

 

 

 

It really didn’t feel safe on the beach, you can’t trust the ocean, when it’s rough and the beach is small. We didn’t stay for long.  I’ll definitely have to go back.

For some of my images of the wider Kerry area check out this tag for Kerry Coast Images

https://www.helene-brennan.com/tag/kerry+coast+images

Thanks for viewing my post, and keep safe.